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Law School Agrees to Drop Accreditation Suit

George Indest HeadshotBy George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

On January 16, 2019, the Summit School of Law in Arizona (Arizona Summit) settled a lawsuit against the American Bar Association (ABA) over the decision to pull the law school’s accreditation. The for-profit law school, which is in the process of closing down, agreed to dismiss the suit with prejudice.

This matter may be of interest to those involved in medical education, because of the accreditation problems faced by some medical schools and recent actions taken to revoke the accreditation of or not accept the graduate from some foreign medical schools. There are lessons to be learned from this case.

“The ABA and the council welcome the end of this dispute. We look forward to continuing to serve the best interests of law students, the public, and the profession through the ABA law school accreditation process, which has consistently been upheld by courts and has been approved by the U.S. Department of Education,” Barry Currier, managing director of the ABA section that accredits and regulates law schools, said in a statement the ABA issued.

ABA Enforcement Actions.

Arizona Summit is one of three schools that filed suit against ABA’s enforcement actions, arguing that due process rights were violated before the decision to be put on probation. All three law schools, owned by InfiLaw Corp., sued the ABA in May 2018, regarding accreditation issues. Click here to view Arizona Summit’s compliant against the ABA in full.

Requirements For Law School Accreditation.

In June 2018, ABA decided to pull accreditation for Arizona Summit, saying it had fallen short of standards on student admissions and bar passage rates. ABA requires schools to see at least 75% of students pass the bar within five years. Additionally, passage rates for first-time bar takers are required to be within 15% of the school’s average in three of five years. You can learn more about ABA’s Standards and Rules of Procedure for Approval of Law Schools here.

According to Arizona Summit’s Report for 2018, the school awarded 118 degrees that year. A total of 25 graduates took the state bar exam for the first time in July 2018, and their pass rate was 52%. A total of 98 graduates of the law school sat for that exam and the overall pass rate was 20.4%.

Therefore, the ABA pulled its accreditation stating that it had fallen short of standards on student admissions and bar passage rates. The school is scheduled to shut down for good in spring 2020.

Don’t Let Accreditation Issues Slow You Down!

We have often been contacted by medical students, resident physicians, fellows, and foreign medical graduates, when experiencing problems with their medical school or graduate medical education (GME) programs. Don’t wait until it is too late to think of consulting with an experienced healthcare attorney regarding possible solutions. Even when it may appear to be too late, it may not actually be too late to recover. Click here to read one of my prior blogs for more information on accreditation matters in graduate medical education (GME) programs.

Contact Experienced Health Law Attorneys Today.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm provide legal representation to medical students, resident physicians, and fellows in academic disputes, disciplinary cases, and disputes with their programs, schools, or institutions. These include graduate medical education (GME) hearings, contract negotiations, conduct committee hearings, charges of irregular behavior, issues with the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME), the United States Medical Licensing Examinations (USMLE) and the Education Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG), license applications, board certification applications and hearings, credential hearings, and civil and administrative litigation.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources:

Cueto, Emma. “For-Profit Ariz. Law School Drops ABA Suit Over Accreditation.” Law360. (January, 16, 2019). Web.

Ward, Stephanie. “Arizona Summit Law School agrees to drop its lawsuit against ABA.” ABA Journal. (Journal 16, 2019). Web.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

KeyWords: legal representation for fair hearings, fair hearings representation, fair hearing defense lawyer, legal representation for administrative hearing, administrative hearing representation, administrative hearing defense attorney, legal representation for due process cases, legal representation for clinical privileges, clinical privileges representation, clinical privileges defense lawyer, legal representation for health care investigations, legal representation for peer review hearings, peer review representation, graduate medical education (GME) hearing legal counsel, medical contract negotiations, conduct committee hearing attorney, defense of charges of irregular behavior, National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) defense attorney, United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) defense legal counsel, Education Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) defense lawyer, medial license application lawyer, board certification application attorney and hearings peer review defense lawyer, legal representation for DOH investigations, legal representation for licensure defense, licensure defense attorney, legal representation for health care professionals, health law defense attorney, The Health Law Firm reviews, reviews of The Health Law Firm attorneys

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of and a registered service mark of The Health Law Firm, P.A., a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 2019 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Medical Resident Awarded More Than $400,000 in Hospital Breach of Contract Lawsuit

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

On October 9, 2018, a jury in Michigan federal court awarded more than $400,000 to the parents of an international medical school graduate after finding that Pontiac General Hospital breached their son’s residency program contract. The law suit, which has been described as a “pay for play” case, was first filed in 2017 in the U.S. District Court in Detroit, Michigan.

Breach of Contract.

The Canadian family claims the owners of Pontiac General asked for $400,000 in exchange for their son’s acceptance into the facility’s residency program in the fall of 2016. Court records show that the medical graduate received a signed residency contract the same day his father paid the final of three checks. However, it is alleged that soon after paying the fee, the hospital breached the contract by declining to let him start the program, and to add insult to injury, the hospital refused to return the funds.

The eight member jury reached a unanimous verdict and the family was awarded a total of $484,000.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm routinely represent medical students, resident physicians and fellowship physicians, in legal disputes with their medical schools, residency and fellowship programs, and with the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE), National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME), Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG), and legal representation and defense of charges of irregular behavior. This representation includes internal disciplinary and grievance hearings, administrative hearings, due process complaints, academic and conduct committee hearings, appeals, and civil litigation. Click here to learn more about how we can help you in situations like this.

Contact a Health Care Attorney that is Experienced in the Representation of Medical Students, Interns, Residents and Applicants, Fellows and Those Involved in Graduate Medical Education.

The Health Law Firm and its attorneys represent interns, residents, fellows and medical school students in disputes with their medical schools, supervisors, residency programs and in dismissal hearings. We have experience representing such individuals and those in graduate medical education programs in various disputes regarding their academic and clinical performance, allegations of substance abuse, failure to complete integral parts training, alleged false or incomplete statements on applications, allegations of impairment (because of abuse or addiction to drugs or alcohol or because of mental or physical issues), because of discrimination due to race, sex, national origin, sexual orientation and any other matters.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources:

“Pontiac General Hospital ordered to pay over $400K to doctor in pay-to-play lawsuit.” WXYZ News Detroit. (October 9, 2018). Web.

Greene, Jay. “Family wins Pontiac General ‘pay-for-play’ residency case.” Modern Healthcare. (October 15, 2018). Web.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

KeyWords: Graduate medical education (GME) defense attorney, international medical graduate attorney, graduate medical education defense lawyer, lawyer for medical students, medical resident physician attorney, residency program legal dispute attorney, residency program litigation, medical school litigation, legal representation for medical residents, legal dispute with medical school, medical students legal counsel, disruptive physician attorney, impaired medical student legal counsel, impaired resident legal defense attorney, United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) defense lawyer, USMLE defense attorney, National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) defense counsel, Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) defense lawyer, ECFMG defense attorney, legal representation for USMLE investigations, legal representation for NBME investigations, legal representation for irregular behavior, irregular behavior defense attorney, irregular behavior defense counsel, health law attorney, The Health Law Firm reviews, reviews of The Health Law Firm attorneys, Philadelphia attorney for ECFMG hearing, Philadelphia lawyer for NBME hearing, Philadelphia legal counsel for USMLE hearing, legal representation for resident physicians and fellowship physicians, representation for legal disputes with medical schools, representation for residency and fellowship programs, National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) attorney, Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) attorney, legal representation and defense of charges of irregular behavior, representation for internal disciplinary and grievance hearings, representation for administrative hearings, representation for due process complaints, academic and conduct committee hearings attorney, civil litigation attorney

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of and a registered service mark of The Health Law Firm, P.A., a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 2018 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

By |2018-11-27T19:31:12+00:00November 27th, 2018|Categories: Medical Education Law Blog|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |1 Comment

Have You Received a Letter from the ECFMG or USMLE Accusing You of Irregular Behavior? All Is Not Lost; Legal Advice Is as Close as a Phone Call Away!

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Have you recently received a letter from the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) or the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Secretariat accusing you of “irregular behavior?” All is not lost. But you should seek advice from an attorney or law firm that has a lot of experience with such matters, before responding or doing anything else.

If You Are Innocent or Have a Believable Explanation to Justify What You Are Being Accused of Doing, You Need to Defend Yourself Against the Accusations of “Irregular Behavior.”

Yes, it is possible to successfully defend yourself against accusations of “irregular behavior.” However, we do not suggest that you should attempt to represent yourself or do this on your own. In any letter you receive on this will be advised of your rights to make a statement explaining your side, to have a hearing committee consider the matter, to appear in person before the hearing committee, and to have legal representation (an attorney) at the hearing with you to represent you. We recommend that you always ask for an exercise all of these rights.

It has been our experience that those individuals who think that they can just write a letter and explain what happened will usually not succeed. A full investigation has already been conducted by the USMLE or ECFMG and it will feel that it has already adequately explored and discovered all of the facts in your case.

It is our advice that you must always find out exactly what evidence or information the organization has against you and you must appear in person and testify under oath at a hearing at which the committee can ask you questions in order to show your honesty and innocence.

As Attorneys Experienced in Such Matters, We Know How to Prepare and Present Cases to Such Hearing Committees and to Successfully Convince Them of Your Position.

Our law firm and our attorneys have had a great deal of experience in dealing with the ECFMG and the USMLE on issues involving grading on the Step examinations, accusations of “irregular behavior,” testing and grading irregularities, and allegations regarding conduct which the organizations contends is “irregular behavior” (including mistakes in completing applications and affidavits). We haven’t represented many medical students and medical graduates in challenges, hearings before the committees, and on appeals.

Although, just as in medicine, in legal matters such as this one, we cannot guarantee any specific outcome or success in a case, we can advise you of our many successful cases. Finding any lawyer in the United States who has a great deal of prior experience with the USMLE or the ECFMG is very difficult. There are very, very few of us. Additionally, once you check out the backgrounds of any attorney whom you are considering, you may find that the particular attorney is not what you expect or would desire to hire. You want to hire attorneys that have a great deal of experience in this area, who know what they are doing, and who will not exaggerate or promise you that which they are not able to deliver.

Experience, Organization, and Knowledge are the Hallmarks of Our Legal Representation of You!

In our case, we tell the truth, we know what the “hot” issues are that are important to the ECFMG he and the USMLE, and we are aggressive advocates of your innocence or your position in the case. We prepare ahead of time and put together a comprehensive, detailed, and well organized presentation, through documents, which we deliver to the committee ahead of time for its consideration at your hearing. We always go to the hearing in Philadelphia, appearing with you in person at the hearing, and making the best presentation possible for you. We are by your side allo the way!

We do our best to prepare you ahead of time, going over potential questions that the committee might ask you and preparing your testimony in advance. We try not to leave anything to chance. If you are subject of a similar type of hearing, or court case, then you really do need experienced legal counsel to help you prepare. You should not try to do this alone.

Severe Consequences of Receiving a Label of “Irregular Behavior.”

There can be some very severe consequences of receiving a label of “irregular behavior,” if you do not adequately defend against such allegations. These can extend all the way from a stamp on the transcript of your Step examination scores stating “irregular behavior,” with a letter attached to it going into great detail about your “irregular behavior,” all the way to a complete ban (forever) from taking any further Step examinations, and everything in between. Even the stamp of “irregular behavior” alone can prevent you from successfully matching with residencies you are seeking or obtaining jobs you desire. This is similar to having a stamp of “Found Guilty of Cheating” on a transcript; the effect may be the same. You may find yourself being excluded from receiving interviews or invitations from residency program for which you apply.

Do not take a chance! Although legal representation may be expensive, you must consider the amount of time and money you have already spent to date to have a medical career and be willing to spend what it takes to continue that career. Don’t jeopardize it by trying to scrimp on legal fees. Remember that you usually get what you pay for.

View Our Other Blogs on Our Experience with the USMLE, ECFMG, and NBME, and Hearings on “Irregular Behavior.”

Our law firm is had a great deal of experience representing students and graduates in disputes with and defending charges of “irregular behavior” against the USMLE, ECFMG and he NBME. To review a few of these please see:
Limits on Number of Attempts and Time for Completion of USMLE Step Exams and
ECFMG Affidavit to Complete? Attending a Caribbean Medical School? Being Investigated for Irregular behavior by the ECFMG or USMLE? You need Legal Advice! Your Residency Matching Might Now Be at Issue, as Well!

Contact a Health Care Attorney Experienced in the Representation of Medical Students, Interns, Residents and Applicants, Fellows and Those Involved in Graduate Medical Education.

The Health Law Firm and its attorneys represent interns, residents, fellows and medical school students in disputes with their medical schools, supervisors, residency programs and in dismissal hearings. We have experience representing such individuals and those in graduate medical education programs in various disputes regarding their academic and clinical performance, allegations of substance abuse, failure to complete integral parts training, alleged false or incomplete statements on applications, allegations of impairment (because of abuse or addiction to drugs or alcohol or because of mental or physical issues), because of discrimination due to race, sex, national origin, sexual orientation and any other matters.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620

KeyWords: Graduate medical education (GME) defense attorney, international medical graduate attorney, graduate medical education defense lawyer, lawyer for medical students, medical resident physician attorney, residency program legal dispute, residency program litigation, medical school litigation, legal representation for medical residents, legal dispute with medical school, medical students legal counsel, disruptive physician attorney, impaired medical student legal counsel, impaired resident legal defense attorney, United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) defense lawyer, USMLE defense attorney, National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) defense counsel, Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) defense lawyer, ECFMG defense attorney, legal representation for USMLE investigations, legal representation for NBME investigations, legal representation for irregular behavior, irregular behavior defense attorney, irregular behavior defense counsel, health law attorney, The Health Law Firm reviews, reviews of The Health Law Firm attorneys, Philadelphia attorney for ECFMG hearing, Philadelphia lawyer for NBME hearing, Philadelphia legal counsel for USMLE hearing

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of and a registered service mark of The Health Law Firm, P.A., a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 2018 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Contracting 101: Medical Graduates Entering the Workforce, Follow These Tips!

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

This is part one, of a blog series that is intended to provide an introductory review of the basics of contracting for medical graduates entering the work force as residents and fellows, primarily by discussing employment agreements. We will highlight many of the common provisions found in employment contracts, along with many of the mistakes and pitfalls that we see in our day-to-day practice.

By the end of this informational blog, it is our hope that medical graduates will better understand the common language and terms found in employment contracts for health care professionals. The following tips are meant to assist new professionals in recognizing common mistakes made by physicians and health professionals when negotiating contract terms. We hope to help make both employers and employees more knowledgeable about employment contracts so they can avoid potential problem areas and legal entanglements.

Our comments here are meant to provide general rules we have learned from our experience. However, please remember, every situation is different and there are exceptions to every rule. These tips are not intended to constitute legal advice. We recommend contacting an experienced health attorney for questions or concerns regarding specific employment contracts, or to thoroughly review all of the contract terms prior to acceptance.

Tip 1 -“Standard” or “Routine” Physician Employment Agreements Do Not Exist.

No two employment agreements are identical. Each must be reviewed on its own terms. It is important to consult with a healthcare lawyer experienced in negotiating employment contracts and evaluating health care business transactions.

Tip 2 – Negotiation is Always an Option.

Even though an employer may have what appears to be a “standard” employment contract for all physician employees, this can have changes, amendments, schedules, exhibits or terms that are varied from physician to physician or professional to professional. Generally, large employers are less likely to change their form to accommodate the physician than small organizations, but they can and often will. Small employers are often willing to make more changes to their written agreements.

If there are any changes, additions or clarifications you need to make to the contract, then put them in writing, sign them, incorporate them into the contract and attach them to the contract.

Tip 3 – All Oral Agreements Should be Accurately Reflected in the Wording of the Contract.

If it is different or not specified, the language in the contract will govern in any future dispute.

For more information, please read one of my prior blogs on physician and employment contracts here.

In our future blogs, we will continue to provide tips on various issues to watch for in health care employment contracts.

Stay tunes for part two of this blog series.

Contact a Health Care Attorney that is Experienced in the Representation of Medical Students, Interns, Residents and Applicants, Fellows and Those Involved in Graduate Medical Education.

The Health Law Firm and its attorneys represent interns, residents, fellows and medical school students in disputes with their medical schools, supervisors, residency programs and in dismissal hearings. We have experience representing such individuals and those in graduate medical education programs in the following areas: in various disputes regarding their academic and clinical performance, allegations of substance abuse, failure to complete integral parts training, alleged false or incomplete statements on applications, allegations of impairment (because of abuse or addiction to drugs or alcohol or because of mental or physical issues), discrimination due to race, sex, national origin, sexual orientation and any other matters, reviewing and negotiating contracts, preparing contracts, helping employers and employees enforce contracts, advice on setting aside or voiding contracts, litigation of contracts (in start or federal court), business transactions, professional license defense, opinion letters, representation in investigations, fair hearing defense, representation in peer review and clinical privileges hearings, litigation of restrictive covenant (covenants not to compete).

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law is an attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Avenue, Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

KeyWords: physician employment agreement, physician employment contract, health professional contracting, negotiating business transactions, physician contracts, contracting tips for medical graduates, contract attorney, business law attorney, business lawyer, contract lawyer, contract litigation, business litigation, employment contract terms, physician agreements, physicians entering the workforce, business transactions, restrictive covenants, noncompetition agreements, covenants not to compete, business ventures, residency and fellowship, medical graduate attorney, fellowship contract lawyer,Graduate medical education (GME) defense attorney, international medical graduate attorney, graduate medical education defense lawyer, lawyer for medical students, medical resident physician attorney, residency program legal dispute, residency program litigation, medical school litigation, legal representation for medical residents, health care professional representation, health care professional defense lawyer, Florida health care lawyer, The Health Law Firm reviews, reviews of The Health Law Firm attorneys

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of and a registered service mark of The Health Law Firm, P.A., a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 2018 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

ECFMG Affidavit to Complete? Attending a Caribbean Medical School? Being Investigated for Irregular behavior by the ECFMG or USMLE? You need Legal Advice! Your Residency Matching Might Now Be at Issue, as Well!

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Have you recently unexpectedly received an affidavit from the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG or the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Secretariat? Are you attending or have you graduated from a Caribbean medical School such as the University of Science, Art and Technology (USAT), Faculty of Medicine, in Montserrat, or the Atlantic University School of Medicine (AUSOM) in St. Lucia? Then you are probably, unknowingly, being investigated for misconduct, improprieties in your medical school attendance or other “irregular behavior.” You need to consult with a lawyer and specifically a lawyer who knows and understands the processes followed by the ECFMG and the USMLE.

Large Number of Legal Inquiries Being Received from Current Students and Graduates of USAT.

A year ago, our firm was receiving a large number of calls from students and graduates of the Atlantic University School of Medicine (AUSOM) concerning inquiries and letters they were receiving from the ECFMG and/or the USMLE. However, over the past several months, we have now received an even larger number of inquiries from students and alumni of the University of Arts, Technology and Sciences (USAT) Faculty of Medicine in Montserrat. We have now seen several different affidavits which the ECF image he has sent to students and graduates of USAT which request some very specific and detailed information about their course attendance and experience as students at USAT.

Each inquiry we have received from students and graduates of USAT has disclosed facts and circumstances that are slightly different from the other. From these we have been able to piece together a fairly comprehensive picture of what is probably going on. To summarize, it appears that you SAT is under investigation by the ECF image he for the various irregularities that our clients have disclosed have occurred in the past.

Affidavits from the ECFMG and the USMLE Should Be Taken Very Seriously. They Should Be Answered Truthfully and Must Be Returned Promptly.

The Handbook and Guidelines published by the ECFMG and the USMLE, require that any student or graduate who applies for their services must promptly respond to requests for information. This would include responding to the affidavits (which are really questionnaires to be completed under oath). Otherwise, the applicant can be charged by the ECFMG or the USMLE with “irregular behavior” in accordance with the Handbook and Guidelines that they previously agreed to follow when initially applying.

We hear from our callers, clients, and potential clients that they may have received instructions from their schools or from other sources that they do not have to do send these affidavits back in or respond to these requests for information. We do not believe that this is correct and vice. If confronted by having been sent such an inquiry or affidavit by the USEMLE or ECFMG, you should immediately contact competent, experienced, legal counsel to advise you on the exact issues and facts of the situation. You will only receive advice that takes your own personal interests into consideration from your own personal attorney; you are not likely to receive it from anyone else.

View Our Other Blogs on Our Experience with the USMLE, ECFMG, and NBME, and Hearings on “Irregular Behavior.”

Our law firm is had a great deal of experience representing students and graduates in disputes with and defending charges of “irregular behavior” against the USMLE, ECFMG and he NBME. To review a few of these please see:
What to Do If You Receive an Inquiry From the USMLE, ECFMG, or NBME
GOING TO TAKE THE USMLE STEP EXAMS? BEWARE OF ACTIONS THAT CAN BE CALLED “IRREGULAR BEHAVIOR”-PART 1, and
Accused of Irregular Behavior on the USMLE? Here’s What You Will Do Wrong.

Contact a Health Care Attorney Experienced in the Representation of Medical Students, Interns, Residents and Applicants, Fellows and Those Involved in Graduate Medical Education.

The Health Law Firm and its attorneys represent interns, residents, fellows and medical school students in disputes with their medical schools, supervisors, residency programs and in dismissal hearings. We have experience representing such individuals and those in graduate medical education programs in various disputes regarding their academic and clinical performance, allegations of substance abuse, failure to complete integral parts training, alleged false or incomplete statements on applications, allegations of impairment (because of abuse or addiction to drugs or alcohol or because of mental or physical issues), because of discrimination due to race, sex, national origin, sexual orientation and any other matters.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620

KeyWords: Graduate medical education (GME) defense attorney, international medical graduate attorney, graduate medical education defense lawyer, lawyer for medical students, medical resident physician attorney, residency program legal dispute, residency program litigation, medical school litigation, legal representation for medical residents, legal dispute with medical school, medical students legal counsel, disruptive physician attorney, impaired medical student legal counsel, impaired resident legal defense attorney, United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) defense lawyer, USMLE defense attorney, National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) defense counsel, Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) defense lawyer, ECFMG defense attorney, legal representation for USMLE investigations, legal representation for NBME investigations, legal representation for irregular behavior, irregular behavior defense attorney, irregular behavior defense counsel, health law attorney, The Health Law Firm reviews, reviews of The Health Law Firm attorneys, Philadelphia attorney for ECFMG hearing, Philadelphia lawyer for NBME hearing, Philadelphia legal counsel for USMLE hearing

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of and a registered service mark of The Health Law Firm, P.A., a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 2018 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

What to Do If You Receive an Inquiry From the USMLE, ECFMG, or NBME

By Achal A. Aggarwal, J.D., M.B.A., Attorney, The Health Law Firm

The National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) is an organization that sets certain standards for anyone seeking licensure in the U.S. It prepares and administers state recognized examinations for medical students and medical residents, to assure they meet certain requirements for clinical knowledge (CK) and ability to interact effectively with patient using the English language, the latter know as “clinical skills” (CK). The NBME’s mission is centered on the assessment of physicians. The NBME develops and manages the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) through the USMLE Secretariat.

The USMLE is a multi-part professional examination sponsored by the NBME and the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB). In order to obtain a license to practice medicine or to participate in medical specialty residency programs in the U.S., one must take and successfully pass all four parts of the USMLE. Each part of the USMLE is referred to as a “step.”

Foreign medical graduates must register with and be screened by the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG), in order to take the USMLE step examinations and become licensed in the U.S. They must also pass all of the steps of the USMLE.

The USMLE is administered in four parts: USMLE Step 1, USMLE Step 2 Clinical Knowledge (CK), USMLE Step 2 Clinical Skills (CS), and the USMLE Step 3.

When a medical student or medical resident is suspected of compromising the validity, integrity, or security of the examination process, the USMLE and the NBME will investigate. The investigation is to determine whether or not that student or resident obtained proprietary information or helped others to cheat on the USMLE.

The Consequences of Irregular Behavior Charges.

When the USMLE, NBME, or ECFMG has initially determined that a student, medical school graduate, resident or fellow, may have committed some act that may have violated the integrity of the examination, may have attempted to gain an unfair advantage over other test-takers, or may have violated the security of the test, then it will charge that student or resident with what is called “irregular behavior.” This term could probably be interchanged with the word “cheating” but is much broader than and may encompass far more than what you would normally think of as cheating.

A charge of irregular behavior can have many unforeseen adverse consequences. Not only can these be adverse actions taken by the NBME, USMLE, or ECFMG, they may extend even wider.
The NBME, USMLE, or ECFMG may, for example void test scores, prohibit you from taking a test exam for a number of years, ban you from ever taking the step exams again, or may simply mark your transcript of test scores with the finding of “Irregular Behavior” (think of a big red stamp on your transcript that says “Irregular Behavior” or “Cheated”). However, such a finding may also result in the student’s being expelled from their medical school, not receiving a medical degree, or prevented from applying in the match program.

However, before the medical student or resident is officially charged with committing irregular behavior, the USMLE, NBME, or ECFMG sends a letter informing the individual of the charge and giving the person ceratin rights. The letter also offers the student or resident an opportunity to defend the allegation and attend a hearing in front of a committee (usually called the “Committee for Individualized Review” or CIR) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

What to Do If You Receive a Letter from the USMLE Accusing You of Irregular Behavior.

The letter will usually include certain information and analysis including: the number of times the student or resident took the particular Step examination previously, the percentage of actual test questions to which the student was exposed, how well other test-takers did on the same individual questions, the time spent on the questions, the actions the person allegedly committed which violated the organization’s guidelines, and other information that may be relevant regarding the alleged “Irregular Behavior.”

Details on the rights the individual has to retake the tests or to challenge the findings by requesting a hearing is also included. These are contained in a section of the letter or in a separate attachment called “Policies and Procedures.”

If requested in writing in a timely manner, the CIR will schedule a time to review the facts surrounding the allegations (a hearing) and to hear from the individual. The person may just submit an explanation in writing without requesting an in-person hearing, but we recommend strongly against this. The student or resident may request and attend a hearing before the committee, in person or with an attorney (which we strongly recommend), if he or she so desires. The hearing takes place in Philadelphia.

Evidence may be submitted by the student, including his or her own testimony. The student may have legal representation (an attorney) with him or her at the hearing. Hearings have resulted in students having their test scores validated and being allowed to progress with their professional careers unfettered. They have also resulted in bans from ever retaking the step exams (in the most egregious cases).

Important Factors to Consider for a Hearing Before the Committee for Individualized Review.

Attending a hearing before the CIR is not a process that should be taken lightly, not is it a procedure that you should attempt without experienced counsel. We do not recommend attending such a hearing without an attorney and plenty of advance preparation.

When deciding whether or not to hire an attorney to represent you in this matter, consider the cost and time you expended in preparing for and taking these examinations. In addition, consider the time you will lose from your medical education, residency, internship, or future career if your passing scores are not validated and your studies and career are delayed. It seems illogical not to retain the services of an attorney experienced with this type of matter and this type of hearing, given the high stakes at issue. Even if you have some knowledge of law, evidence, and civil procedure, it is difficult to represent yourself while also being your own witness. Those who are not experienced in such matters will make fundamental mistakes that will harm their case.

Procedural guidelines furnished by the committee need to be followed regarding how evidence is given to the committee and presented at the hearing. Preparation for the hearing would include meetings in advance, preparation of questions and answers and other matters to help ensure a proper presentation. One who is not familiar with such proceedings may overlook key issues and concentrate on issues that are not relevant to the committee’s determination. Any presentation of documents for consideration at the hearing must include excellent organization and a professional presentation. This must be done well in advance of the hearing. In certain cases, it may be necessary to hire an expert witness if the issues and facts require it; however, live witnesses, other than the individual charged, are not allowed at the hearing. It is important to note that the CIR will have its own attorney present at the hearing and there are several attorneys who may be on the committee itself.

Finally, anyone with a charge of irregular behavior should remember that the CIR is not comprised of individuals who are “on your side.” The CIR’s purpose is to ensure that the USMLE policies and procedures are strictly enforced and will enforce them if it does not find your case convincing. The best way to make your strongest argument is to hire someone who has experience with CIR hearings and has won cases in front of it.

Everyone needs someone on their side and we strongly encourage you to hire someone who knows the process associated with Irregular Behavior and the CIR and who will fight for your right to defend yourself.

Contact a Health Care Attorney Experienced in the Representation of Medical Students, Interns, Residents and Applicants, Fellows and Those Involved in Graduate Medical Education.

The Health Law Firm and its attorneys represent interns, residents, fellows and medical school students in disputes with their medical schools, supervisors, residency programs and in dismissal hearings. We have experience representing such individuals and those in graduate medical education programs in various disputes regarding their academic and clinical performance, allegations of substance abuse, failure to complete integral parts training, alleged false or incomplete statements on applications, allegations of impairment (because of abuse or addiction to drugs or alcohol or because of mental or physical issues), because of discrimination due to race, sex, national origin, sexual orientation and any other matters.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: Achal A. Aggarwal is an attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Avenue, Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

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“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of and a registered service mark of The Health Law Firm, P.A., a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 2018 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

 

It is Always a Bad Idea For a Doctor to…

4 Indest-2009-3By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

In my 30 plus years of practice representing physicians, dentists, nurses and psychotherapists, I have defended clients involved in many different situations. Several of these seem to be problem areas which we see repeatedly.

Following is a list of those problems which it would seem to be common sense for a physician or other health care professional to avoid doing. If you do any of these you can rest assured that you will eventually be confronted with charges and an investigation by your state licensing board, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), your national certification board, any facility at which you have privileges and other law enforcement agencies.

I can assure you, it is always a bad idea for a physician or other health care professional to:

1. Write a prescription for any medication for yourself.

2. Start a romantic relationship with a patient.

3. Take someone else’s prescription medication, ever.

4. Write a prescription for or treat a patient, especially a family member, for a condition outside the scope of his or her specialty (e.g., a dentist prescribing antibiotics to her children to treat a cold; a pediatrician prescribing pain medications for an adult; an OB/GYN prescribing antidepressants for a male).

5. Write any prescription for or treat any patient who is in another state when the physician is not licensed in that state.

6. Treat or prescribe for any spouse, other family member, friend or colleague, without opening a medical record and fully documenting the treatment or prescription, as you would for any other patient.

7. Hire a patient to work for you in your office or allow a patient to “volunteer” to work in your office.

8. Pre-sign blank prescriptions for your Physician Assistant, ARNP, Medical Assistant, receptionist, or anyone else, to complete later.

9. Seek psychotherapy or drug/alcohol abuse treatment with a physician or HCP health professional in your own medical group, institution or the staff of your hospital.

10. Add to, alter or change any medical/dental record entry after you know there may be a claim, investigation or litigation involving it.

11. Take and use your own drug samples provided by pharmaceutical companies.

12. Go into a hospital where you do not have clinical privileges and treat or “assist” in treating a patient there, even if it is your own patient.

13. Have a sexual relationship ( including “sexting” or “telephone sex”) with a patient or patient’s immediate family member.

14. For a mental health professional (psychiatrist, psychologist, mental health counselor, social worker, psychiatric nurse practitioner) to have any type of social relationship with a current patient.

If you find yourself doing any of the items listed above, don’t wait until it’s too late. An experienced health care attorney can help guide and defend against licensing issues including investigations from your state licensing board and the DEA.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced with Investigations of Health Professionals and Providers.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm provide legal representation to physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, CRNAs, dentists, pharmacists, psychologists and other health providers in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) investigations, FBI investigations, Medicare investigations, Medicaid investigations and other types of investigations of health professionals and providers.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.
About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

KeyWords: Items health care professionals should avoid doing, investigation by state licensing board, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), licensure defense for health care professionals, legal representation for health professionals, DOH investigations, The Health Law Firm reviews, reviews of The Health Law Firm Attorneys, The Health Law Firm

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 2016 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

 

Medical Residency and Fellowship Program Problems: Do’s and Don’t’s of Dealing with Graduate Medical Education (GME) Programs

4 Indest-2009-3By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Medical residents and fellows, often when experiencing problems with their graduate medical education (GME) programs, wait until it is too late to think of consulting with an experienced healthcare attorney regarding possible solutions. Even when it may appear to be too late, it may not actually be too late to recover.

Try to take appropriate actions and make informed decisions at the earliest possible stages; try not to wait until you have received a notice terminating you to consult with an experienced health lawyer.

Medical Residents and Fellows Play Two Different Roles and Have two Different Sets of Rights.

Always remember that, as a resident or fellow, you actually have two different positions and two different sets of rights apply to you.

First, you are a learner (similar to a student) in an education program. In a teaching hospital or other GME program, you have certain academic rights afforded to you by virtue of this academics arrangement. These may arise from the requirements imposed by certifying bodies such as the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) or the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ACOG). Such standards are usually embodied in both the program’s GME Manual/Handbook and in the separate Residency or Fellowship Program Manual/Hanbook for that medical specialty program. These will include the right to file grievances regarding adverse decisions and the right to hearings and appeals (and other “due process rights”) on adverse actions and decisions.

Whether the adverse action is a failing grade in a rotation, placement on probation, placement on a personal improvement plan (PIP), a requirement to remediate a course, exam or rotation, or a termination from the program, it is important to know what your rights are and to exercise them, at the earliest possible time.

Second, you are an employer of a hospital or institution, as well. You have a written employment contract. You have rights such as to be free from discrimination of various forms. You have the other rights all employees have as set forth in numerous state and federal laws, as well as in the employer’s employee handbooks, manuals and policies and procedures.

If you are being sexually harassed, then you should file a complaint with your employer’s Human Resources Department followed by one with the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) or equivalent state agency (such as the Florida Commission on Human Relations Commission or FCHR). If you are being forced to work in a hostile work environment because of discrimination based on your race or nationality, then you should also file a complaint as above. If you have any type of mental or physical handicap or disability or any type of mecial condition which may affect your ability to perform (ADHD being the most common one we have seen) then you should give your employer notice of this and request reasonable accommodations to help you (most employers have online forms or forms available from the Human Resources Office for this. But do this at the earliest possible opportunity, preferably, at the very start of your residency or fellowship.

Be sure you obtain, review and save copies of all of the handbooks, manuals, and policies and procedures discussed above.

Know What the ACGME Says Your Program’s Obligations Are to You as a Resident or Fellow.

Also, review what the ACGME says your program must be doing to properly perform its role as a teaching institution. Go onto the ACGME website and review these requirements. These include, for example, providing regular and meaningful feedback on your performance and being sure you are given the proper opportunities to know what your perceived deficiencies are and to correct them.

If these are not embodied in the institution’s GME Program Manuals/Handbooks, then the program is deficient and may be subject to losing its accreditation.

Advise Your Program Director and the Head of the GME Program If the Program’s Obligations to You Are Not Being Met.

If you are not receiving timely and appropriate feedback on your performance, both formal and informal, give written notice to the Program Director, with a copy to the GME Office requesting that it be placed in your GME file.

If you receive an adverse evaluation because of bias or prejudice, immediately give written notice to the Program Director, with a copy to the GME Office requesting that it be placed in your GME file.

If you are given warnings, counseling, adverse evaluations, remediation or performance plans that are based on incorrect facts, immediately rebut these, in writing, using neutral and objective statements. Provide a copy of this to the Program Director, with a copy to the GME Office requesting that it be placed in your GME file, attached to the document it rebuts.

If you have personal problems, family problems, medical problems or other problems that are affecting your ability to perform, then ask for as much time off as you may conceivably need to take care of these, even if it means taking unpaid time off or an extended leave of absence. It is much better to address this type of issue up front and make up missed rotations and exams than to ignore them and fail. To learn more, click here to read one of my prior blogs on this issue.

You Need to Recognize Problems and Take the Appropriate Actions, Too.

If you have medical problems which affect your performance, seek the correct type of treatment from the appropriate medical specialist, and stay in follow-up treatment. If you have ADHD with which you are coping, you need a good psychiatrist to help you manage it, not a family practice physician. If you are dealing with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), you need a good psychiatrist to help you manage it, not an OB/GYN or mental health counselor. But you also need to apply for reasonable accommodations.

If you are not the brightest person to ever graduate from medical school and you are in the best, hardest, most sought after residency program, maybe you are in over your head. Maybe you should consider changing to a different program before you are terminated form this one.

I represented a resident once who had been diagnosed with cancer twice while in residency. Twice he went through chemotherapy and radiation treatments and defeated the cancer. He also attempted to return to the program, to resume a very demanding schedule and not take time off to properly recuperate. He could have and should have taken a year’s leave of absence for each cancer he had.

He wound up being terminated. He did not recognize his limitations or ask for appropriate accommodations. On the other hand, he was lucky to be alive and to be a doctor, regardless of failure to complete his residency.

Take Action to Protect Your Rights and Request the Appropriate Remedies.

Know your rights under your GME program. Seek the advice of experienced legal counsel at the earliest possible time, even if only to review your options and help decide on a course or action.

Know and exercise your rights as an employee, but remember, you are a special type of employee. Seek the advice of experienced health care legal counsel at the earliest possible time, even if only to review your options and help decide on a course or action.

These problems and issues are ones for a board certified healthcare lawyer, not an employment lawyer, contract lawyer, trial lawyer or criminal defense lawyer. Know the difference. Click here to read about the qualifications of a board certified healthcare lawyer.

You must Exhaust Your Remedies Within Your Program First, If You Decide You must Sue in Court Later.

Don’t believe that you can just go out and sue in court and achieve what you want. First, courts are very reluctant to second guess academic decisions made by teaching institutions. They just don’t like to be in the business of second-guessing clinical professors and academicians. They don’t have the training and knowledge to do so, in many cases. Second, courts expect that you have gone through any internal administrative remedies that you may have within the program (called “exhaustion of administrative remedies”). This includes grievances, appeals, academic hearings and due process provisions. A court will not entertain a case until you have done so, so you may as well go ahead and get this done. To read what our firm does in the area of complex litigation, click here.

However, if you are in a program in a state or federal hospital or university program, you will have greater due process of law rights available to you to enforce in court under the U.S. Constitution and state laws than what you would have in a private institution.

Also remember that in court litigation, your GME handbook or manual, your Program handbook or manual and your program’s or hospitals policies and procedures will be your “GME contract” which you can enforce, in addition to your written employment contract.

Remember That External Complaint Mechanisms Are Also Available That May Help Remedy Your Situation.

We discussed filing discrimination and harassment complaints with ouside agencies such as the EEOC and the state human relations commission (such as teh Florida Commission on Human Relations). However, you can also file a complaint with the ACGME or other accrediting body, if the program is not meeting its standards. For information on how to do this, click here.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Office of Civil Rights (OCR), may also be an appropriate place to file a complaint, under many circumstances. For examples, click here.

For more information on what we, as healthcare lawyers, can do to help you, please visit this article on our website.

Contact Experienced Health Law Attorneys Representing Medical Students, Residents and Fellows.

The Health Law Firm routinely represents medical students, residents and fellows who run into difficulties and have disputes with their medical schools or programs. We also represent other health providers in investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, inspections and audits involving the DEA, Department of Health (DOH) and other law enforcement agencies. Its attorneys include those who are board certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law as well as licensed health professionals who are also attorneys. Our attorneys can represent you anywhere in the U.S. and anywhere in Florida.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law is an attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Avenue, Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

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“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of and a registered service mark of The Health Law Firm, P.A., a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 2018 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

By |2018-04-05T19:17:57+00:00May 15th, 2018|Categories: Medical Education Law Blog|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |0 Comments

Always Be Certain Your Correspondence Is Professional. Don’t Detract From Your Professional Reputation: 30 Tips (Part 2 of 3)

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

This is Part 2 of a 3 part series on this issue.

I continue with my tips for preparing good, professional correspondence:

5.    Use titles or honorifics.  In the “business address” of your correspondence, always use the complete name of the person to whom you are writing (if known) together with that person’s honorific or professional title (e.g., Mr., Ms., Dr., Nurse, Prof., Dean, etc.).  This shows both respect and professionalism.

6.    Always use the complete mailing address, including title, of the person to whom you are sending it.  In the business address of your correspondence include not only the person’s name and honorifics, but title or position and division within the institution or organization to which you are sending it.  In the case of large organizations, you should include the building and suite or room numbers and any internal routing codes, designations, “mail stops” or other organizational routing codes, that the agency or business you are writing requires to route its mail internally.  Large organizations, especially government agencies, all have large mail rooms which sort and route all mail the organization receives from any source.  Correct internal routing codes will help ensure that your correspondence gets to the correct person or official in a timely manner.

7.    Always use a salutation.  This is self-explanatory, but see below.

8.    In your “salutation,” always use the person’s last name with a title or honorific.  It is customary to use the term “Dear” in a salutation in formal writing, so this is permitted.  But you may leave it out.  For example, “Dear Secretary Jones:” or “Secretary Jones:” or “Dear Dr. Johnson:” is correct.  Never refer to the person by that person’s first name in any type of formal correspondence or correspondence that anyone else might read.  Never say:  “Dear Sue:” or “Sharon:”.  Even if you know these people well enough to call them by their first names, don’t do it in this situation;  it’s unprofessional and may be interpreted as “talking down” to the person.

9.    Always end your “salutation” with a colon, not a comma.  A comma is only used in informal communications to those you know well or socially, such as a letter to your mother or a note to your girlfriend.  Unless this is your mother or your girlfriend to whom you are writing, use a colon.  For example, “Dear Secretary Jones,” or “Dear Sue,” is incorrect.  “Dear Secretary Jones:” or “Ms. Smith:” is correct.

10.    Type your correspondence or have it typed for you.  Do not send handwritten letters in formal or professional matters.  Do not write on the other person’s correspondence or documents and send it back.  Prepare and send a professional looking letter or e-mail, even if you must pay someone to type it for you (and if you are sending an e-mail, I know you can type a little bit yourself, anyway).  To do otherwise is to show laziness, disrespect and unprofessionalism.

11.    Always use a type font in your correspondence (inlcuding e-mails) of at least 12 points (10 characters per inch).  Do not use a small, difficult to read type fonts, for example, the size of the type font that most e-mail software defaults to.  Smaller type fonts than 12 points become difficult to read, especially if scanned/rescanned, faxed/refaxed or copied/recopied.  Change the default font in your e-mail software or computer word processing software, if necessary.  You can do this, regardless of how difficult it may seem at first;  I know you can do it, because I can do it.  Make your professional correspondence easier to read, not more difficult to read.

12.    Never use unprofessional looking type fonts for your communications.  Stay away from script type fonts, italics or novelty type fonts.  These are notoriously more difficult to read and look unprofessional.  You are not publishing a flyer for a high school bake sale.  Times New Roman, CG Times and similar type fonts are more professional looking and easier for a person to read.  Use Courier or Letter Gothic type fonts if necessary.

13.    Keep the correspondence to which you are responding unmarked.  One reason to not write on or mark up the other person’s documents or correspondence is that you may need them as evidence in a court of law or a hearing some day.  Nothing looks less professional than a document you are trying to use as evidence when a different person has made handwritten marks all over it.  The impression is similar to one in which a child with a box of crayons has gotten to it.  You don’t want this or need this.  Show respect and self-control.  Keep the other side’s documents pristine.  They will look much better that way as your “Exhibit 1” in the court hearing.

14.    Use a good concise, descriptive reference line or subject line (often called the “re:” line).  Make it a very brief summary.  State what the content of your letter is about.  State if you are responding to a letter or document that you received from the “addressee” (the person to whom you are addressing your correspondence) of your letter.

15.    Include the recipient’s routing information.  If the intended receiver of your letter or correspondence (the “addressee”) included reference numbers, file numbers, account numbers, case name and numbers, a policy number, a routing number, or other similar information on its letter to you, repeat these back in the reference line of your correspondence.  This will help make sure that your correspondence gets routed to the correct file and recipient more timely.  This is especially crucial in large organizations and government agencies.

16.    The contents of the body of your correspondence should be easy to read and easy to understand.  To this end, be sure to use short sentences and short paragraphs.  Each paragraph should convey one idea. Use headers and section titles, if necessary, to organize your correspondence, especially if it is lengthy.  Remember, headings within your letter that help to organize it are like street signs in a busy city.  They will really help any subsequent reader (and this may be a judge or jury) to navigate his or her way through your letter.

17.    Be sure to skip a line between each paragraph and, preferably, indent the first line of each paragraph.  [Note:  Some writers will tell you not to indent the first line of each paragraph in professional correspondence.  However, I feel that this makes the correspondence more difficult to read, so I encourage indenting or tabbing in on the first line of each paragraph.]  This makes it easier on the reader and more likely that your ideas will not get lost in a crowd of words.

18.    Keep your paragraphs short and to the point.  Nothing turns readers off as much as a single lengthy paragraph written from margin to margin taking up the whole page.  I suppose some people may have never been taught what paragraphs are.  However, I am willing to bet that most were.

Contact Experienced Health Law Attorneys.

The Health Law Firm routinely represents pharmacists, pharmacies, physicians, nurses and other health providers in investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, inspections and audits involving the DEA, Department of Health (DOH) and other law enforcement agencies. Its attorneys include those who are board certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law as well as licensed health professionals who are also attorneys.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law is an attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Avenue, Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

KeyWords: The Health Law Firm, legal representation for health care physicians, reviews of The Health Law Firm, tips for professional correspondence, The Health Law Firm attorney reviews, legal representation for nurses, professional correspondence for a legal dispute, owners of health care businesses defense attorney, physicians defense lawyer, 30 tips for professional correspondence, The Health Law Firm reviews

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 2016 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.
By |2018-05-18T12:57:32+00:00May 15th, 2018|Categories: Medical Education Law Blog|0 Comments

UCF Medical Student and Her Furry Friend Bring Smiles to the Faces of Ill Children During the Holidays

i4Perfection150429-1A6A0291-Edit-EditBy Ritisha K. Chhaganlal, J.D.

University of Central Florida (UCF) second-year medical student, Christa Zino, and her 2-year-old adopted canine friend, Ion (a boxer), know that smiles can go a long way in healing the spirits of hospital-bound children during the holidays.  And they don’t stop there.  Zino and Ion visit Nemours Children’s Hospital (Nemours) in Orlando most Friday evenings to bring some joy to children who often have to endure extended hospital stays, arduous medical tests and procedures, and separation from family, home and school.  Most of these young children lack a normal childhood experience due to their illnesses, but Zino knows that Ion has what it takes to keep these tenacious little ones going strong regardless of their current circumstance.

That’s why even a busy schedule and final exams cannot keep Zino and Ion away from Nemours this month.  UCF Today quoted Zino as stating, “When I think it is too much and that I can’t handle everything, this reminds me…why I want to be a pediatric surgeon.  I want to help children like the ones I see every week.”

For more information on the benefits of animal-assisted activities, visit the Nemours website here.

Getting to Know Ion: 65 Pounds of Friendly Canine.

Ion is one of Zino’s three canine companions chosen by Zino to become officially certified for pet therapy.  Ion was adopted by Zino from Florida Boxer Rescue.  Zino says Ion is reserved around children and “gentle in a way he never is when he’s just with me [Zino].”  The fact that Ion is all-around a big fur ball of friendly should not be surprising considering his beginning (prior to rescue).  Apparently Ion has always lacked aggression, which most dog owners would appreciate, but ironically landed Ion on Craigslist by a disgruntled former owner who was disappointed that Ion was not a “fighting champion.”

Good riddance, however, because it seems Ion has found his perfect fit with Zino as a “health care professional,” providing therapy to others in the form of palm kisses and snuggles.  And he’s quite the hit within the UCF campus community of medical students as well, providing Zino’s fellow stressed-out and sleep-deprived classmates with a welcomed “pick-me-up” three times a week.

Zino’s Inspiration to Assist Children: Drawing From Her Own Experience.

Zino knows firsthand how dismal hospital life can be for a child because she was an extended-stay patient as a child herself.  Zino was diagnosed with a bile-duct blockage as a toddler.  With her condition being so rare in someone so young, Zino spent 18 months in and out of hospitals and away from her home and Chihuahua in Apopka, Florida.

While Zino recalls very little from her experience, the one thing she vividly remembers is her visit from a furry friend.  As reported by the Orlando Sentinel, Zino says she simply remembers “being happy” as a therapy dog sat on her bed keeping her company during a difficult time.

It was this very experience and positive memory that has led Zino to pursue a career as a pediatric surgeon as well as to carry on the grand tradition of meet-and-greets between sick children and a furry friend who shows up just in time to make them smile.

To read the full story as reported by UCF Today, click here.

Comments?

Are you currently a medical student, or are you considering a career in medicine?

Contact a Health Care Attorney that is Experienced in the Representation of Medical Students, Interns, Residents and Applicants, Fellows and Those Involved in Graduate Medical Education.

The Health Law Firm and its attorneys represent interns, residents, fellows and medical school students in disputes with their medical schools, supervisors, residency programs and in dismissal hearings. We have experience representing such individuals and those in graduate medical education programs in various disputes regarding their academic and clinical performance, allegations of substance abuse, failure to complete integral parts training, alleged false or incomplete statements on applications, allegations of impairment (because of abuse or addiction to drugs or alcohol or because of mental or physical issues), because of discrimination due to race, sex, national origin, sexual orientation and any other matters.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources:

Kotala, Zenaida.  “Therapy Dog Brings Smiles Back to Sick Children, Medical Students.”  UCF Today: 21 Dec. 2015.  Web.  21 Dec. 2015.

Santich, Kate.  “Canine Spreads Cheer to Ill Children.”  Orlando Sentinel: 18 Dec. 2015: Final Ed.: A1 &A6.  Print.

About the Author: Ritisha K. Chhaganlal, J.D., is an attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone (407) 331-6620.

KeyWords: Graduate medical education (GME), medical graduate attorney, Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), graduate medical education attorney, lawyer for medical students, medical resident attorney, residency program legal dispute, residency program litigation, medical school litigation, legal representation for medical residents, medical students legal counsel, United States Medical Examiners (NBME) lawyer, health law attorney, The Health Law Firm, UCF medical student, University of Central Florida College of Medicine, canine therapy

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.

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By |2015-12-21T18:58:31+00:00May 15th, 2018|Categories: Medical Education Law Blog|0 Comments
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