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What Happens at a Board of Nursing Meeting?

George F. Indest III is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

George F. Indest III is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

The Florida Department of Health has many boards which regulate various licensed health care professions. One of the boards that makes up the Department of Health is the Board of Nursing. The Board of Nursing regulates the nursing profession.

The Board of Nursing holds public meetings in which it conducts all of its business. These meetings are scheduled in advance. Notice of when and where they are going to be held is available on its website usually several months in advance. The Board of Nursing rotates its meetings around the state, each time meeting in a different major city. Therefore, one meeting may be help in Jacksonville, the next meeting may be held in Ft. Lauderdale, and the next meeting may be held in Orlando.

The Board of Nursing is required by law to publish its agenda ahead of time so that the public is aware of matters that may come up in the event they want to attend the meeting. Usually these are published from 20 to 30 days ahead of time. Board of Nursing meetings are very interesting. Usually, nursing schools will require their students to attend, if the meeting is held near them.

If you have never attended a Board of Nursing meeting, you should. You should especially attend one of you have a pending Department of Health investigation against you. Attending a Board of Nursing meeting will give you a lot of insight into whether or not to elect an informal hearing if your case progresses past the probable cause panel stage. (See separate chapter in this Manual on DOH investigations and hearings).

Did you know that you can obtain continuing education units (CEUs) just for attending a Board of Nursing meeting? You can receive up to eight hours of CEUs for this. Just be sure to sign in on the sign-in sheet on the table in or outside the meeting room in order to record your attendance and obtain a CEU certificate.

Meetings are Open to the Public. 

Board meetings are open to the public. Notice of meetings are published in the Florida
Administrative Weekly. A draft agenda is available, on the board website, at least one week before the meeting and for public inspection during the Board meeting. Due to the fact that the Board’s meetings are quasi-judicial meetings the public is requested to refrain from applause, booing or other emotional outbursts. There are rare occasions in which the Board and its members will enter an executive session, this is a non-public session, to discuss issues which are confidential.

Organization of the Board of Nursing.

The business of the Board revolves around committee reports, staff and counsel reports, review of licensure and examination applications and discipline for violation of the Florida Nurse Practice Act, Board rules and other laws. Committee meetings typically occur on Wednesday evening and Thursday morning. The major committees of the Board of Nursing include: Practice, Legislative, Education, Continuing Education, ARNP, CNA Council and Credentials.

The full Board of Nursing meets on Thursday afternoon to hear committee reports and other board business and on Friday the Board meets to hear discipline cases. The individuals who are most active at the Board meetings are the chair, vice chair, board members, board counsel, prosecuting attorneys, IPN and the executive director.

A. Chair/Vice Chair

The chair is responsible for the organization and running of the Board meetings. The agenda is prepared by staff but the Chair may alter or reorganize the sequence of issues. The Chair seeks to keep the board on task and often summarizes discussion. Unlike some organizations, the Chair is a full member of the Board and is required to vote on all issues, unless the Chair is recused because she has a conflict of interest on the issue in which she is voting on. Just like any other member of the Board the Chair may make motions and second motions of others. The Chair will also seek clarification from counsel, board members, staff and others if requested. The Vice Chair performs these duties in the absence of the Chair.

B. Board Members

Members of the Board are required to vote on all issues, unless they are recused because of a conflict of interest. A Board member who sits on a probable cause panel may have already heard some evidence in disciplinary cases and, therefore, that member is automatically recused from voting on the case when it appears before the full Board. Board members review around 35,000 pages of scanned documents on CD-ROM prior to a Board meeting; documents received after the CD is made are distributed in paper form prior to the meeting. The documents typically included in the CD are applications for licensure, administrative complaints against an individual, investigative reports, orders, stipulations and other records. Orders are legal documents filed by the Board to take action against an applicant or licensee. A stipulation is a tentative agreement between the prosecuting attorney and the respondent; however, the Board must approve a stipulation before it can take effect. Board members determine severity of discipline using established guidelines; the cost of investigation is always included.

C. Executive Director

The Executive Director is the person responsible for the functioning of the Board office. The office staff prepares the agenda in concert with counsel and prosecuting attorneys, organizes and schedules the meetings and facilities, publishes notices, provides public copies of documents and maintains records of proceedings. The staff also processes applications for licensure or examination, maintains disciplinary files, reviews applications for new nursing programs, monitors statistics and prepares reports as requested. Other administrative and support staff may be present during the Board meetings.

D. Board Counsel

An Assistant Attorney General serves as legal counsel to the Board. Counsel responds to requests from the Chair to clarify requirements in Florida laws and rules which may affect the Board decisions. Counsel prepares draft documents for Board review, including proposed rules. Counsel will also inform the Board members of possible legal issues or implications of various courses of action being contemplated. Often, several different sections of laws may affect a decision and the discussion may become confusing. After the meeting, Counsel will prepare the final orders and other documents that are to be filed and sent to respondents.

E. Prosecuting Attorneys

These attorneys from Medical Quality Assurance (MQA) Enforcement (sometimes called
“Prosecution Services Unit”) review all disciplinary cases and prepare materials for Board review. Administrative complaints outline the alleged violations of the Florida Nurse Practice Act, rules of the Board and other laws. Investigative reports provide information from witnesses, records and others about the situations described in the administrative complaint.

If the respondent selects an informal hearing before the Board, the prosecuting attorney reads a summary of the administrative complaint and provides legal notification of procedures followed in notifying the respondent. However, if you choose an informal hearing, you are agreeing that all facts in the administrative complaint are true and you are guilty of the allegations; the only issue left undecided is what your punishment is to be. This is the equivalent of a guilty plea or a no contest plea in a court of law. You may have good defenses that could be raised in a formal hearing and you have procedural rights which may result in dismissal of the case. When in doubt, you should always request a formal hearing.

Please see the separate chapter in this Manual on disciplinary hearings.

Remember, even if you have signed the election of rights form and waived your right to a formal hearing and requested an informal hearing, if you get to the Board of Nursing meeting and change your mind, tell them that you are contesting the facts of the case, that you are contesting your guilt and that you want to withdraw your decision to have an informal hearing. It is very important that you do this if you are really innocent.

Sometimes a stipulation (also called a settlement agreement, and which is similar to a plea bargain in a criminal case) is agreed to between the parties. The Board must still approve the stipulation before it becomes final. If the Board of Nursing rejects a stipulation you have agreed to, it may make you a counter-offer that contains more punishment. Always ask for time (at least a week) to think about the counter-offer. If the Board rejects the stipulation, you will then have the right to a formal administrative hearing to determine your guilt r innocence. You may want to do this.

If a respondent disputes the facts of a case, for example, if the Respondent wants to argue that he is really innocent of the charges, then a hearing before an administrative law judge (ALJ) will be held. When in doubt, you should always request a formal hearing.
Please see the separate chapter in this Manual on formal administrative hearings. The ultimate findings of the ALJ after the formal hearing will be sent to the Board for final action.

F. Respondents

There are two typical respondents that appear before the Board. The first type of respondent is an applicant for licensure or examination. These persons may have discipline in another state, positive findings during criminal background screening, deficiencies in education or other credentials. The Board reviews these cases to determine if the applicant can be approved for licensure or examination. If your application is going to be heard at a Board meeting it would be extremely wise to appear before the Board, should they want to ask you any questions, with a qualified attorney certified in health law.

The second type of respondent that typically appears before the Board is a licensee who has had a complaint filed against them for violation of the Nurse Practice Act, rules of the Board or other laws and rules. Some respondents may be required to appear before the Board; however, in most cases the choice is up top the respondent. An attorney may appear for the respondent; if the respondent chooses to be represented by an attorney it is best to have an attorney who has been certified in heath law and has
represented other nurses in disciplinary proceedings before. A respondent may also bring a witness to appear on their behalf. All respondents and witnesses are sworn under oath.

G. Intervention Project for Nurses (IPN)

Representatives from IPN are present Board meetings to provide reports on individuals enrolled in the program. In addition, if the Board orders a respondent to be evaluated by IPN, information about the process is immediately available. IPN provides evaluations and consultant services for nurses or candidates for licensure. Most services revolve around drug and alcohol abuse but may also include mental health or behavioral problems and psychological testing. See separate chapter in this Manual for more detail on IPN.

The Board of Nursing Meetings are Open.

The Board of Nursing is required to hold all of its meetings in a manner which is open and
accessible to the public. These Board meetings revolve around committee reports, staff and counsel reports, issues of interest to nurses, nursing practice issues, review of licensure and examination applications and discipline for violations of the Florida Nurse Practice Act, Board rules and other laws and regulations. You will learn quite a lot about your profession and how it is governed in the state of Florida by attending a Board of Nursing meeting. There is bound to be one near you soon.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Nurses.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent nurses in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, Department of Justice (DOJ) investigations, in appearances before the Board of Nursing in licensing matters and in many other legal matters. We represent nurses across the U.S., and throughout Florida.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

 

What Nurses Need to Know about Florida Law and HIV Testing

indest9By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Section 381.004, Florida Statutes, provides for an increased level of protection of medical records that contain human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) test results. The super confidentiality requirements imposed by Florida law are viewed as the precautions which must be taken both before an HIV test can be performed and after the HIV test is performed to ensure patient confidentiality.

Pre-Test Requirements.

The administration of an HIV test requires the informed consent of the patient for whom the HIV results will be obtained. No person in Florida may order an HIV test without first obtaining the informed consent of the person upon whom the test is being performed. Section 381.004(3)(a), Florida Statutes. Consent need not be in writing if the medical record documents that consent was given. Section 381.004(3)(a), Florida Statutes. Informed consent must be preceded by an explanation of the right to confidential treatment of information identifying the subject of the test and the results of the test to the extent provided by law. Information must also be provided on the fact that a positive HIV test result will be reported to the county health department with sufficient information to identify the test subject and on the availability and location of sites at which anonymous testing is performed.

Post-Test Requirements.

Notification – Once an HIV test has been administered, there are a number of statutorily prescribed steps that a health care professional must follow. All reasonable efforts must be made to notify the test subject of his or her test result. Section 381.004(3)(c), Florida Statutes. Notification of a person with a positive test result will include information on the availability of appropriate medical and support services, the importance of notifying partners who may have been exposed, and preventing the transmission of HIV. When testing occurs in a hospital emergency department, detention facility, or other facility and the test subject has been released before being notified of positive test results, informing the county health department for that department to notify the test subject fulfills this responsibility. No test result shall be determined as positive, and no positive test result shall be revealed to any person, without corroborating or confirmatory tests being conducted except in the following situations:

1. Preliminary test results may be released to licensed physicians or the

medical or nonmedical personnel subject to the significant exposure for purposes of
subparagraphs (3)(h)10., 11., and 12.

2. Preliminary test results may be released to health care providers and to the
person tested when decisions about medical care or treatment of, or recommendation to, the person tested and, in the case of an intrapartum or postpartum woman, when care, treatment, or recommendations regarding her newborn, cannot await the results of confirmatory testing. Positive preliminary HIV test results shall not be characterized to the patient as a diagnosis of HIV infection. Justification for the use of preliminary test results must be documented in the medical record by the health care provider who ordered the test. This subparagraph does not authorize the release of preliminary test results for the purpose of routine identification of HIV-infected individuals or when HIV testing is incidental to the preliminary diagnosis or care of a patient. Corroborating or confirmatory testing must be conducted as followup to a positive preliminary test. Results shall be communicated to the patient according to statute regardless of the outcome. Except as provided in this section, test results are confidential and exempt from the provisions of Section. 119.07(1), Florida Statutes. Section 381.004(3)(d), Florida Statutes.

Confidentiality.

Once an HIV test has been performed and the results have been obtained, confidentiality must be preserved. The identity of any person upon whom a test has been performed and test results must be held confidential. Section 381.004(3)(e), Florida Statutes. No person who has obtained or has knowledge of an HIV test result may disclose or be compelled to disclose the identity of any person upon whom a test is performed, or the results of such a test in a manner which permits identification of the subject of the test,
except for the following reasons:

1. Patient Release. Consent for disclosure by the subject may be obtained in
a “legally effective release.” Section 381.004(3)(e)(1-2), Florida Statutes.

2. Authorized agents or employees of providers and facilities. Personnel
within a single facility or provider are authorized to disclose to each other
on a “need to know” basis.

3. Health care consultation. Health care providers that are not employees of
the same provider or facility may disclose HIV test results to each other
without the subject’s consent, provided they are involved in the care or
treatment of the test subject and the consultation is for the purpose of the
patient’s diagnosis or treatment. 381.004(3)(e)(4), Florida Statutes.

4. Department of Health. The Department may share HIV test results “in
accordance with rules for reporting and controlling the spread of disease,
as permitted by state law.” 381.004(3)(e)(5), Florida Statutes.

5. Transfer of body parts. Health care facilities and providers who transfer
body parts and semen, for the purposes of artificial insemination, may
disclose HIV test results to each other. 381.0041, Florida Statutes.

6. Health facility staff committees may disclose HIV test results for the
purposes of conducting program monitoring, program evaluation, or
service reviews pursuant to Chapters 395 and 766, Florida Statutes.

7. Research. HIV test results may be disclosed to authorized medical and
epidemiological researchers who are then prohibited from disclosing any
identifying characteristics or information regarding test subjects. Section
381.004(3)(e)(8), Florida Statutes.

8. Court Orders. Subpoenas are not sufficient under Florida law for the
release of HIV test results. A court order must be obtained and this
process is not easily accomplished. A “compelling need” must be
demonstrated by the individual seeking the results and the court must
balance this need against the test subject’s privacy rights as well as
public’s interests in privacy.

9. Workers’ Compensation. An administrative law judge of compensation
claims of the Division of Workers’ Compensation may authorize
disclosure of HIV test results, but only upon a finding that the person
seeking the test results has demonstrated a compelling need for the results.

10. Custodians of Children. Under Section 381.004(3)(e)(11), Florida
Statutes, there are three classes of persons allowed access to HIV test
results:

a. Department personnel and other employees “directly
involved in the placement, care, control or custody” of
the tested child who demonstrate a need to know;

b. Adoptive parents of the tested subject; or

c. An adult custodian, relative or other person responsible
for the child’s welfare if the parent or legal guardian
cannot be reasonably located and informed of the test
result.

Oral Disclosure.

Oral disclosure of HIV test results shall be accompanied by oral notice and followed by a written notice within 10 days. This written notice shall include the following statement: “This information has been disclosed to you from records whose confidentiality is protected by state law. State law prohibits you from making any further disclosure of such information without the specific written consent of the person to whom such information pertains, or as otherwise permitted by state law. A general authorization for the release of medical or other information is NOT sufficient for this purpose.” Section 381.004(3)(f).

Penalties.

Any violation of this section by a facility or a licensed health care provider is grounds for
disciplinary action contained in the facility’s or professional’s respective licensing chapter. Any person who violates the confidentiality provisions commits a misdemeanor of the first degree. Any person who obtains information that identifies an individual who has a sexually transmissible disease, including human immunodeficiency virus or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, who knew or should have known the nature of the information and maliciously, or for monetary gain, disseminates this information or otherwise makes this information known to any other person, except by providing it either to a physician or to a nurse employed by the department or to a law enforcement agency, commits a felony of the third degree. Section 381.004(6), Florida Statutes

Conclusion.

The use of tests designed to reveal a condition indicative of human immunodeficiency virus infection is a valuable tool in protecting the public health. Many members of the public are deterred from seeking such testing because they misunderstand the nature of the test or fear that test results will be disclosed without their consent. The laws imposed on the super confidentiality of HIV testing are intended to benefit the public health and the public will be benefited by the nursing profession, when those nurses serve by facilitating informed, voluntary, and confidential use of tests designed to detect human immunodeficiency virus infection.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Nurses.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent nurses in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, Department of Justice (DOJ) investigations, in appearances before the Board of Nursing in licensing matters and in many other legal matters. We represent nurses across the U.S., and throughout Florida.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.thehealthlawfirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.

Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Adverse Consequences of Discipline Against Your Nursing License

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

If the Florida Department of Health (DOH) takes discipline against your Florida nursing license, this will have many significant consequences.

Investigation and Discipline of Other State Licenses.

The discipline will be reported to every other state in which you have a license and similar investigations will be opened by those states.

Many states also have laws similar to those of Florida which require you to report discipline yourself to the other state in which you are licensed. Sometimes this is very short, 15 or 30 days, for example. Check the other state’s laws to be sure.

Discipline Against Other Types of Licenses.

If you have other types of health professional licenses, such as a massage therapist (LMT) license, emergency medical technician (EMT) license, mental health counselor license (LMHC), advance registered nurse practitioner (ARNP) license, acupuncture physician (A.P.) license, etc., it is most likely that an investigation will be opened against the other license. This may result in discipline against your other license.

Discipline Will be Reported to the National Practitioner Data Bank.

Additionally, any discipline against your Florida nursing license will be reported to the National Practitioner Data Bank (NPDB), as well as other reporting organizations. You may also face action to exclude you from the Medicare Program by the Office of the Inspector General (OIG). If this occurs, it will be virtually impossible for you to get a job anywhere, especially in a hospital or facility.

Possible Loss of Certification.

In addition, if you are certified in a specialty, your certification organization may revoke or not renew your certification. It may also have rules requiring you to report disciplinary action.

Loss of Employment Opportunities.

Many health facilities, insurers, hospitals and other employers have policies against hiring nursing professionals with discipline on their licenses. Regardless of what an employer or supervisor might orally tell you, company policy, whether formal (written) or informal, may cause you to be terminated as an employee.

Buy Insurance to Cover License Investigation Legal Defense Expenses: It’s Cheap.

Most nursing malpractice insurance policies are very inexpensive and provide excellent coverage. Most contain insurance coverage that will pay for an attorney and other legal defense expenses if you are being investigated or charged with a licensure offense. Buy this. You should have at least $25,000 in coverage for such investigations and administrative proceedings. $50,000 in coverage would be better, even if you must pay extra or buy additional coverage.

If you are innocent of the charges alleged against you, a fully contested formal administrative hearing (trial) could easily cost $50,000. If you can’t afford to pay this amount yourself, you may have to give up your rights to proof of your innocence or guilt. Buy insurance to cover such unfortunate circumstances.

Obtain an Experienced Health Law Attorney Immediately After Receiving Any Notification of an Investigation from the Department of Health.

If the DOH is investigating you, you will receive a letter stating that an investigation has been opened by the DOH for discipline against your license. Do not speak with or make any statement to any DOH investigator (for more on this, see our previous blog post). Instead, immediately obtain an experienced health law attorney to represent you throughout the investigation and disciplinary proceedings.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Board of Nursing Cases.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent nurses in Department of Health Investigations, before the Board of Nursing, in appearances before the Board of Nursing in licensing matters, and in administrative hearings.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author:  George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

Florida Nurse Allegedly Filled Fake Prescriptions for Painkillers

5 Indest-2008-2By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

A Central Florida nurse is in trouble with the law for allegedly writing fake prescriptions and illegally obtaining painkillers for herself, according to the Orlando NBC affiliate, WESH television. The nurse was allegedly arrested during the week of December 31, 2012. She is accused of trafficking in oxycodone and trying to fill forged prescriptions.

Click here to read the WESH article.

Pharmacist Did Not Fall For Fake Prescription.

According to an Orlando Sentinel article, a pharmacist, who was suspicious of one of the prescriptions the nurse tried to fill, called the doctor listed on the prescription. The doctor informed the pharmacist that she (the doctor) was the nurse’s employer, and the nurse was not a patient. It was then discovered that the nurse used the names of two doctors at her place of employment. She had stolen the prescriptions to obtain painkillers for herself.

A search of Florida’s Prescription Drug Monitoring Database allegedly showed that the nurse had obtained dozens of prescriptions for controlled substances for herself in the past year.

To read the article from the Orlando Sentinel, click here.

Check the Department of Health (DOH) Website for a Health Provider’s License Status. 

According to the Department of Health (DOH) the nurse’s license is currently suspended. A complaint on the nurse’s record also shows that in December 2009, the nurse admitted to stealing pain medication from her patients.

Preventing Employees from Stealing.

I recently wrote an article for Medical Economics on how to prevent or detect employee embezzlement in the medical or dental office. It contains valuable information for any small health care practice owner. Topics discussed in the article include: how to recognize embezzlement warning signs, steps to take to safeguard your assets, and the proper way to take action against a suspected embezzler. To read it in its entirety, click here.

I have also written a number of blogs on abuses with narcotics. See my blog on a fake prescription ring busted in Osceola County, and a Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) arrest of a doctor allegedly on crack cocaine charges, for example.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Nurses.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent nurses in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, Department of Justice (DOJ) investigations, in appearances before the Board of Nursing in licensing matters and in many other legal matters. We represent nurses across the U.S., and throughout Florida.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

As a health professional how do you keep tabs on your important office supplies? How would you handle an employee stealing from your office? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Pavuk, Amy. “Nurse Charged with Stealing Scripts, Illegally Obtaining Painkillers.” Orlando Sentinel. (January 3, 2013). From: http://articles.orlandosentinel.com/2013-01-02/news/os-nurse-arrested-prescription-drugs-20130102_1_fake-prescriptions-prescription-sheets-cvs

WESH-TV. “Nurse Accused of Illegally Obtaining Painkillers.” WESH. (January 3, 2013). From: http://www.wesh.com/news/central-florida/seminole-county/Nurse-accused-of-illegally-obtaining-painkillers/-/17597106/17995906/-/dmj2se/-/index.html?absolute=true

 

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.

Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Tips, Pointers and Reminders for Administrative Hearings

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Formal administrative hearings are one of the options provided to a person who has significant (or substantial) interests that will be affected by agency action and who contests the material facts involved in the case.

In this blog, we are usually discussing a hearing involving the professional license of the nurse. In many cases this will be a notice of intent to deny a license application; however, in most cases, it will be based on an administrative complaint filed against the nurse charging the nurse with a violation of the Nurse Practice Act or other misconduct.

A formal administrative hearing is the only chance which is provided to a nurse to actually challenge the facts of the case and show, for example, that she is not guilty of the charges alleged against her. The formal administrative hearing is the only proceeding in which the nurse against whom the complaint is filed (called the “respondent”) may confront the evidence against her (documents and witnesses) and introduce her own evidence (including her own testimony, if desired), to show she is not
guilty of the charges.

Formal administrative hearings are governed by the Florida Administrative Procedure Act (APA), Chapter 120, Florida Statutes. Please see the separate chapter in this Manual on the Administrative
Procedure Act.

Our Tips, Pointers and Reminders for Administrative Hearings.

This is a partial checklist of some of the matters we check in preparing for administrative hearings. It is not complete and it may not apply in every case. It should serve as a reminder of certain issues that
should be checked up on prior to the actual date of the hearing.

1. If you need one, make sure to notify the ALJ or make a reservation for a televison monitor, VCR/DVD, projector, screen, or conference phone early (when the original order setting the hearing is received), and follow up with a confirmation letter to the hearing coordinator.

2. Make sure all witnesses testifying have been listed in your answers to interrogatories, and if not, amend your answers to include all witnesses. Also, check the witness list for the pre-hearing stipulation.

3. File all discovery responses/answers immediately when received, with the Clerk of the Division of Administrative Hearings, using a notice of filing, so these will be in the official record. If there is discovery not answered, do a motion to compel (except with requests
for admissions).

4. Some administrative law judges have ceratin procedures they require or certain things they don’t allow in hearing procedures. It is a good idea to check with someone else who has appeared before the ALJ to find out if that ALJ has any.

5. Go onto the Division of Administrative Hearing website, search for and review the last few recommended orders (ROs) and Final Orders on your administrative law judge ahead of time. This will give you an idea of what the administrative law judge is like and how he/she has ruled on various issues in the past. The DOAH website is (www.doah.state.fl.us). Go to case search, put in ALJ’s name and agency name (for example DOH) to obtain Recommended Orders on similar cases.

6. On the day of the hearing, get to the room at the final hearing site early to organize and re-set the room if necessary, to choose where you want to sit. Rearrange the room, if necessary to have a proper hearing setting to create one large conference able in the middle, as most administrative law judges seem to prefer this.

7. Investigation reports are inadmissible as hearsay. You must object to them if the DOH attorney attempts to introduce one.

8. Also, settlement negotiations (including the transcript or minutes of Board meeting at which a settlement stipulation was considered, and any statements made by the respondent or anyone else in support of it are inadmissible, per Rule 90.408 (civil) and Rule 90.410
(criminal) of the Rules of Evidence.

9. Affidavits are considered hearsay evidence, but since this is an administrative hearing the ALJ may allow one or more into evidence, if it is being used to corroborate previously admitted evidence.

10. If you want to introduce an affidavit at hearing and you have the witness who made the affidavit available, have the witness present, have the witness take the stand and testify from the affidavit.

11. Bring a copy of the most recent DOAH court docket for case, to be able to prove that a document was or was not filed.

Although not directly applicable to a formal administrative hearing involving a nursing license case, the following checklist which we use for formal hearings involving Medicaid benefits, may also be useful to you.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Nurses Administrative Hearings.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent nurses in administrative hearings, depositions, Department of Health investigations, before the Board of Nursing, and in appearances before the Board of Nursing in licensing matters.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

Nursing Liability and Nursing Malpractice – Part 2

8 Indest-2008-5By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

In this blog I discuss the concept of nursing malpractice. It is the second blog of my two-part series. To read part one, click here.

The Duty of Reasonable Care.

The plaintiff must first show that the nurse had a duty to provide care for the plaintiff. The element of duty is usually straightforward and relatively easy for the plaintiff to prove because once nurses undertake care for their patients they have a clear duty to provide care for that patient in a competent and reasonable manner. Nurses owe a clear duty of care to all of their patients.

Breach of Duty.

When applied to nursing, a breach of a duty occurs when a nurse does, or does not do, what a reasonable nurse would have done under the same, or similar, circumstances. This would mean that the nurse’s care fell below the acceptable standard of care.
The standard of care is a legal concept which reflects how a nurse is expected to act professionally. It incorporates the expectation that nurses conduct themselves with the degree of care, skill and knowledge that reasonably competent nurses would exhibit in a similar situation. It is important to remember that the standard represents a minimum level of practice to which nurses must adhere in order to avoid being found negligent. In other words, nurses do not have to exert heroic efforts to perform their job satisfactorily; they are expected to exercise their good judgment, education and training to the best of their ability, under the circumstances. Nursing care that falls below the acceptable standard of care may result in a medical malpractice lawsuit against the nurse. The standard of care is particular to each field of nursing practice. For instance, orthopedic nurses determine the standard of care for orthopedic nurses.

Injury or Damage.

To prove the element of injury the plaintiff must be able to establish that, in addition to pain and suffering, they have experienced a physical injury, lost money or have an actual reduction in the quality of their life. The injury which the plaintiff suffered will help to determine the monetary damages that will be awarded if the plaintiff succeeds at trial.

Causation.

Causation is often the most difficult element of medical malpractice to prove. In order to prove that the defendant caused their injury, loss or harm, the plaintiff must show that the defendant’s act or omission either caused, or was a substantial factor in causing, harm to the plaintiff. If the defendant proves that the harm would have occurred anyway, irrespective of the defendant’s act or omission, then the negligence action will fail for lack of causation.

Sources for the Standard of Care.

Where do nursing standards come from, and who decides what the standard of nursing care should be in each particular medical malpractice case? The answer is that the sources for nursing practice standards are varied. The court relies on some or all of theses sources to help determine the applicable standard of care in each individual case.
Some of these sources for nursing standards include:

1. Florida Nurse Practice Act, Chapter 464, Florida Statutes;
2. Other Florida Statutes and the Florida Administrative Code;
3. Case law;
4. Principles, guidelines and standards of professional associations such as the American Nursing Association (ANA);
5. The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO);
6. Hospital Policies;
7. Standards of Care as testified to by other members of the profession; and
8. Authoritative Nursing Texts and Journals.


Nurse’s Accountability for the Standard of Care.

As a licensed nurse, you are expected to know what the generally accepted standard of care entails and follow that general standard in your daily practice. The policy and procedure manual of your facility should contain nursing care guidelines. However, if the facility you are working in does not adhere or comply with the generally accepted standard of nursing care, then, following the facility’s policies and procedures will not protect you from a charge of malpractice. This is because all nurses are accountable for the nurse’s standard of care. If you are aware that your facility’s policies and procedures are below the generally accepted standard of care, then you should promptly notify your nurse-manager or the risk-control committee of your concerns.

Conclusion.

Over the years nurses are becoming ever more likely targets for plaintiffs, and their attorneys, in medical malpractice cases. It is extremely important for a nurse to know the malpractice laws that encompass the nursing profession. By knowing each element of medical malpractice and the different standards of care that a nurse is held to. A nurse who can adhere to the different standards of care can avoid being held liable for medical malpractice.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Nurses.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent nurses in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, Department of Justice (DOJ) investigations, in appearances before the Board of Nursing in licensing matters and in many other legal matters. We represent nurses across the U.S., and throughout Florida.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

North Florida Nurse Arrested for Neglecting Elderly Patient

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

An investigation led by the Attorney General’s Medicaid Fraud Control Unit (MFCU) ended with an arrest of a north Florida registered nurse (RN), in Suwannee County. The arrest was based on allegations of failing to assess and monitor a 94-year-old patient’s condition. The patient fell and broke her hip and shoulder, and later died.

Click here to see the full press release from the Attorney General’s (AG) Office.

RN Charged with Neglect and Falsifying Hospital Records.

According to the investigation, the RN allegedly failed to care for and monitor the condition of a 94-year-old woman. The RN is accused of falsifying hospital medical records to conceal her failure to provide proper nursing care to the victim.

The RN turned herself in to the Suwannee County Sheriff’s Office. The nurse faces up to five years and two months in prison and a $5,500 fine, according to the AG’s Office.

The AG’s press release states that this case will be prosecuted by the State Attorney’s Office for the Third Judicial Circuit of Florida.

Responding to a MFCU Investigation.

The MFCU is in charge of investigating and prosecuting health care providers suspected of defrauding the state’s Medicaid program. When the unit opens a case against a provider, the first step is usually the issuance of an investigative subpoena, requesting specific patient records.

I previously wrote a blog with tips on how to properly respond to such a subpoena and how to be prepared to defend oneself. Click here to read that blog.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Nurses and Registered Nurses (RNs).

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent nurses and registered nurses (RNs) in MFCU investigations, in appearances before the Board of Nursing in licensing matters and in many other legal matters. We represent nurses across the U.S., and throughout Florida.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources:

Gainesville.com. “Nurse Arrested, Charged with Neglecting Elderly Patient Who Died.” The Gainesville Sun. (June 13, 2012). From: http://www.gainesville.com/article/20120613/articles/120619840

Meale, Jenn. “Attorney General Bondi Announces Arrest of Registered Nurse for Neglecting an Elderly, Disabled Adult.” Florida Office of the Attorney General. (June 13, 2012). From: http://www.myfloridalegal.com/newsrel.nsf/newsreleases/358A1FC528F9A06D85257A1C00729C63

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999. Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

 

Florida Nurse Practitioners Fight for Autonomy

indest1By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

On February 18, 2014, a bill that would expand the authority of nurse practitioners and would allow some to practice independently of physicians was approved by the Florida House Select Committee on Health Care Workforce Innovations. Despite opposition from physician groups, the bill (PCB SCHCWI 14-01) was overwhelmingly approved 13 to 2. However, some of that support might be fleeting.

To read bill PCB SCHCWI 14-01, click here.

Details of the Bill.

Currently, nurse practitioners work under the supervision of physicians. This bill would change the title of what are usually called nurse practitioners, which are registered nurses who have post-college education, usually a master’s degree, to Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs). The bill would also apply to specialists, such as certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs), certified nurse midwives and certified nurse practitioners.

These nurses would gain new powers under the bill, such as the ability to sign documents that now require a physician’s signature, and the opportunity to earn the title “Independent Advance Practice Registered Nurse” after a certain amount of training and experience. Nurse practitioners would no longer have to contract with and pay a “supervising” physician. Another controversial aspect of the bill is to allow these nurses to gain the authority to prescribe controlled substances. Currently, Florida is one of the few states that do not allow this.

Supporters and Opponents Cannot Agree.

Even though the vote drew bipartisan support, several committee members said their support was tentative, and that they wanted to see further debate and amendments.

According to Health News Florida, the President of the Florida Senate reported he opposes the House bill. Many physician groups, including the Florida Medical Association, agree. These groups point out that physicians receive years of additional training to provide care. They also raise the question why students would want to rack up huge amounts of debt to attend medical school if they could do much of the same work as nurse practitioners with less schooling.

Supporters state this bill will help increase access to primary care, particularly in rural areas. Nurse practitioners also state they already provide much of the care that physician groups bill for. It’s argued that similar laws are already in place in a majority of states around the country, according to The News Service of Florida. To read the entire article from The News Service of Florida, click here.

Expanded Scope of Practice for Nurse Practitioners Already Working in Other States.

According to Health News Florida, 23 other states already allow independent practice for nurse practitioners. Also, military services and the Veterans Administration Health System, already allow nurse practitioners to prescribe controlled drugs and allow independent practice. Florida is the only state that prohibits nurse practitioners from prescribing controlled substances.

According to Health News Florida, the issue is not expected to be considered during the upcoming Legislative session. Click here to read the entire Health News Florida article.

Be sure to check this blog regularly for updates to this story.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Nurses.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent registered nurses, nurse practitioners, advanced registered nurse practitioners, certified registered nurse anesthetists, midwives and licensed practical nurses in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, in appearances before the Board of Nursing in licensing matters and in many other legal matters. We represent nurses across the U.S., and throughout Florida.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

What are your thoughts on the bill? Do you think nurse practitioners should have more autonomy? Or do you believe nurse practitioners should be supervised by physicians? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Saunders, Jim. “Nurse Practitioners Win First Round In Fight Over ‘Scope.'” The News Service of Florida. (February 22, 2014). From: http://www.theledger.com/article/20140222/NEWS/140229772/1374?Title=Nurse-Practitioners-Win-First-Round-In-Fight-Over-8216-Scope

Gentry, Carol. “Senate Pres.: No On Nurses’ Bill.” Health News Florida. (February 24, 2014). From: http://health.wusf.usf.edu/post/senate-pres-no-nurses-bill

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2014 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Nurses Need to Monitor Their Personal Nursys Profiles

CCS Blog LabelBy Carole C. Schriefer, R.N., J.D., The Health Law Firm and George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Nurses, did you know that the status of your license and disciplinary actions taken against you are constantly being tracked by employers? It is actually relatively easy with the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) database, called Nursys. What’s even scarier is employers can sign up for an e-Notify option. This is an e-mail notification system that delivers real-time updates to employers about nurses. The Nursys’ e-Notify option is frequently used by hospitals and medical groups to regulate and screen employees. Click here to read a previous blog on Nursys.

It is imperative, as a nurse, you regulate your own profile regularly for discrepancies. You can do so by clicking here for the Nursys website.

Be Familiar with Nursys and the e-Notify Option.

Nursys is the only national database for license verification, discipline and practice privileges for registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs), practical nurses (PNs), certified nurse midwives (CNMs), certified nurse practitioners (CNPs), clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) and certified registered nurse anesthetists  (CRNAs). The data on Nursys comes directly from the Florida Board of Nursing and forty-six (46) other state nursing boards. The e-Notify option provides automatic email notifications of licensure status changes and discipline action changes to employers directly. Any institution that employs a nurse can track or check licensure and discipline information at any time.

Employers using Nursys have the ability to view and manage their institution’s nurse employees, including uploading nurse profiles, searching nurses by name, editing nurse information and viewing individual nurse reports.

Nursys Makes it Easy for Employers to Keep Tabs on Nurses.

According to the website, a nurse’s profile on Nursys contains:

–  the nurse’s name,
–  licensed jurisdiction,
–  license type
–  license number,
–  compact status (single state or multistate),
–  license original issue date,
–  license expiration date,
–  discipline against license, and
–  discipline against privilege to practice.

e-Notify will alert subscribers when then following changes are made to a nurse’s record:

–  license status,
–  license expirations, and
–  publicly available disciplinary and alert action and resolution.

Flaws in the Nursys Program.

If you have recently received discipline from the Florida Board of Nursing, or any other state board of nursing, it would be prudent to immediately check this website to verify that any information listed under your profile is accurate.  The website clearly states that it is the nurse’s responsibility to contact the board of nursing to update his or her information.

Our law firm has encountered errors on this database that our client contended caused him to lose employment opportunities. Be responsible for verifying the information on your personal profile.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Nurses.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent nurses in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, in appearances before the Board of Nursing in licensing matters and in many other legal matters. We represent nurses across the U.S., and throughout Florida.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

Did you know about Nursys? What do you think of the database? Do you monitor your profile? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

About the Authors: Carole C. Schriefer is a nurse-attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Avenue, Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

How Can I Tell Whether or Not My Attorney Knows Anything about Florida Board of Nursing or Disciplinary Cases?

indest1By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Hiring an attorney can be intimidating and costly. However, hiring representation for a Florida Board of Nursing or disciplinary case is an investment in your future and career. An experienced attorney is indispensable for preparing and defending your case. But how do you know if your representation is knowledgeable in health law?

Below are some examples of what an experienced attorney will not say to a nurse about his or her Board of Nursing or disciplinary case. Remember, if you hear any of the advice below, the attorney most likely has limited or no experience in this area of legal practice.

1. Your attorney tells you that you can argue your case to the Board of Nursing.

Reason:

You cannot “argue your case” in front of the Board of Nursing. If you are at a hearing before the Board of Nursing, it is because you have requested an “informal hearing.”

If you have requested an “informal hearing” this means you do not dispute any of the facts alleged against you in the Department of Health (DOH) complaint. If you are not disputing the facts, this means you are agreeing that you are guilty. If you are at a hearing in front of the Board of Nursing, you will not be allowed to argue that you are not guilty, and you will not be allowed to call any witnesses or introduce any documents. You are only there for the purpose of determining how much punishment the Board will give you and this is based on guidelines that the Board has previously enacted.

2. If your attorney tells you that he or she does not intend to submit any information or documents for consideration by the Probable Cause Panel (PCP) of the Board of Nursing.

Reason:

Many cases are dismissed by the Probable Cause Panel (PCP) and this is the easiest, most expedient, and least expensive way of winning your case. However, your presentation (written only) that is submitted to the PCP must be direct, concise, directly address the legal issues, and be well organized. It is not advisable to try to prepare this yourself. We often include affidavits from our own expert witnesses that have reviewed the case. If the PCP does not vote in favor of probable cause, the case is dismissed and closed. It is like it never happened. There is no record kept of the initial complaint.

The PCP of the Board of Nursing consists of between two and four members. Some of these can be laypersons with no experience in your area of healthcare. A majority has to vote and decide that there is probable cause. Therefore, if there are only two members, and you convince one that you did not do it, then there is no probable cause.

In my opinion, this is the best and quickest way to win your case, but you must know what you are doing. There are exceptions to every rule.

3. If your attorney tells you to meet with the DOH investigator or to give a statement (written or oral) to the investigator, especially without being present or preparing you.

Reason:

DOH investigators are similar to police. If you give them any statement, this can be used to prove the case against you. In most cases, you never want to do this. Although there may be a rare exception, we strongly advise the client against this in about 99% of the cases we handle.

Even if you believe that you are totally innocent, your former employer, the unhappy patient who reported you, or the DOH prosecuting attorney may be convinced that you are not innocent and recommend that charges are prosecuted against you. Exhibit 1 used against you at a hearing will be your own statement. The first witness the DOH prosecutor will call to testify will be you.

Be smart in such matters. Don’t think you can just explain the case away. Don’t give evidence that can be used against you. It is not required under Florida law, and you cannot be compelled to do this.

4. If your attorney says you should call and negotiate with the DOH attorney, or PRN/IPN case manager.

Reason:

As discussed above, anything you say can and will be used against you. This is one of the main reasons you should retain an experienced attorney: to act as a buffer between you and the legal system, to protect you, and shield you from mistakes you make that could hurt your defense.

Additionally, if your attorney is not much more familiar with the DOH and the PRN/IPN procedures than you are, then why have you hired him or her?

5. If your attorney tells you not to worry about the hearing, you can later appeal.

Reason:

Only about 20% of cases are won on appeal. On appeal, the Court of Appeal is limited to the record of the hearing that was held. You are not allowed to reargue the facts in an appeal. You are limited to arguing about legal errors that were made during the hearing. If you don’t know the law, you are unable to effectively appeal.

6. If your attorney tells you that he or she can represent you during the investigation but is unable to “try” your case at an administrative hearing.

Reason:

Representation only through the PCP hearing stage simply is not enough. An attorney should have sufficient knowledge, experience, and skill to represent you throughout the entire case. If he or she does not, and formal administrative charges are recommended by the PCP, you will then need to retain a completely new attorney who will need time, effort, and legal fees to learn your case in order to properly represent you.

Additionally only an attorney who has experience in litigation cases against the DOH and your professional board will have the credibility and experience to negotiate the most favorable deal for you if you later desire to settle the case.

Consult With An Experienced Health Law Attorney.

We routinely provide deposition coverage to registered nurses (RNs), advanced registered nurse practitioners (ARNPs), certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs), nurse midwives and nurse practitioners and other health professionals being deposed in criminal cases, negligence cases, civil cases or disciplinary cases.

The lawyers of The Health Law Firm are experienced in both formal and informal administrative hearings and in representing registered nurses (RNs), advanced registered nurse practitioners (ARNPs), certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs), nurse midwives and nurse practitioners in investigations at Board of Nursing hearings. Call now or visit our website www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2014 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

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