Chiropractors Not Allowed to Work for Clinics Owned by Non-Chiropractors in Florida, with Limited Exceptions

00011_RT8By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Apparently there are many chiropractic physicians and other medical business owners who are unaware of the prohibition provided in Florida law against a chiropractor providing services for a business owned by non-chiropractors. By non-chiropractor, this means anyone who does not have a current, active Florida chiropractic physician’s license.

The prohibition for chiropractors was passed into law in Florida originally in 2007. The law was amended in 2012. There had previously been similar prohibitions that applied to dentists and optometrists. To read the article I wrote on these issues, click here.

What’s the Purpose of This Law?

Found in Section 460.4167, Florida Statutes, the law states that a person (which includes a corporation or limited liability company), may not engage the services of a chiropractor as either an employee or an independent contractor to provide chiropractic services, except under a limited set of circumstances. To see the complete text of Section 460.4167, Florida Statutes, click here.

The purpose of the Florida Legislature in passing this law is set forth within the law itself. Subsection 4 of the law states:

The purpose of this section is to prevent a person other than the licensed chiropractic physician from influencing or otherwise interfering with the exercise of the chiropractic physician’s independent professional judgment. In addition to the acts specified [elsewhere in the statute], . . . a person or entity other than [the ones excepted] . . . may not employ or engage a chiropractic physician licensed under this chapter.

Exceptions to the Law.

There are, of course, exceptions stated in this law for organizations that are allowed to employ or contract with chiropractors. These include:

1. Business entities owned solely by chiropractors (licensed in Florida) and their immediate family members.

2. Business entities owned by medical, osteopathic or podiatric physicians licensed in Florida.

3. Business entities owned by hospitals.

4. A clinic that trains chiropractic students that is affiliated with an accredited chiropractic college.

5. A public or private college or university.

6. A business entity that is owned by a corporation that is tax exempt under certain Internal Revenue Service regulations (not-for-profit corporation).

7. A publicly traded corporation.

8. An insurance company licensed in Florida.

9. An HMO or prepaid health clinic (as set forth in chapter 641, Florida Statutes).

10. A clinic licensed as a Health Care Clinic under Florida Statutes, which provides chiropractic services by a licensed Florida chiropractor and also provides other health care services by medical doctors or osteopathic physicians, the medical director of which is licensed under chapter 458 (medical doctors) or chapter 459 (osteopathic physicians), Florida Statutes.

Special Exception for Clinics Licensed Under Florida’s Health Care Clinic Licensure Act.

This last exception, one for clinics licensed under Florida’s Health Care Clinic Licensure Act (Section 400.990, Florida Statutes), provides perhaps the broadest exception. A clinic that is properly licensed by the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA), and meets the other requirements of the law, can be legally owned by non-chiropractors or non-physicians, and chiropractors may legally contract with or be employed by them. The safeguard is that the licensing requirements in Section 400.990 must be met, and physician services other than just chiropractic services must be performed at the clinic.

However, even under the exception provided by the Health Care Clinic Act, any agreement or other arrangement with the chiropractic physician whereby the other person (or an entity) provides the chiropractor with chiropractic equipment or chiropractic materials must contain a provision whereby the chiropractic physician expressly maintains complete care, custody and control of the equipment or practice.

To see the complete text of the Florida Health Care Clinic Act, click here.

Violating the Law Puts Your Professional License in Jeopardy.

If the business entity, clinic or group does not fall squarely within one of the exceptions listed above, the chiropractor may not legally be employed by or provide chiropractic services for it. The penalties for violating this law include:

1. Prosecution for a felony in the third degree.

2. Any contracts associated with the services are void.

3. Disciplinary action against health care licensees pursuant to chapter 456 or chapter 460, Florida Statutes.

4. By implication, since any contracts in violation are void, then any fees or bills for services in violation of the act are also void.

Don’t jeopardize your professional license, your reputation, your assets or your liberty by risking a violation of this act. Consult with an experienced health lawyer on any such business venture or proposal.

Contact a Health Care Attorney Experienced in Negotiating and Evaluating Physician and Health Professional’s Business Transactions.

At the Health Law Firm we provide legal services for all health care providers and professionals. This includes physicians, nurses, dentists, chiropractors, psychologists, psychiatrists, mental health counselors, durable medical equipment suppliers (DME), medical students and interns, hospitals, ambulatory surgical centers, pain management clinics, nursing homes, and any other health care provider.

The services we provide include reviewing and negotiating contracts, preparing contracts, helping employers and employees enforce contracts, advice on setting aside or voiding contracts, litigation of contracts (in start or federal court), business transactions, professional license defense, opinion letters, representation in investigations, fair hearing defense, representation in peer review and clinical privileges hearings, litigation of restrictive covenant (covenants not to compete), Medicare and Medicaid audits, commercial litigation, and administrative hearings.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

Were you aware of this law and its exceptions? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

 

The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved. 

Optometrists and Ophthalmologists Not Seeing Eye to Eye Over Proposed Law Allowing Prescribing

IndestBy George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

This year Florida House Bill 239 and Florida Senate Bill 278 has been reignited in the Florida Legislature. This legislation is pitting optometrists and ophthalmologists against each other in what is being called the “eyeball wars,” according to the Fort Myers News-Press. These bills would expand the authority of optometrists to prescribe certain medications and treat some eye conditions. Optometrists and ophthalmologists are both trying to gain support for their respective viewpoints.

Click here to read the article from Fort Myers News-Press.

Florida House Bill 239 and Florida Senate Bill 278.

Most notably, the bills would expand the scope of practice for optometrists. Optometrists would have prescribing authority of oral medications. However, they would not have the ability to prescribe Schedule I and II narcotics. Optometrists would also be allowed to perform clinical laboratory studies.

Click here to read Florida House Bill 239, and click here to read Florida Senate Bill 278.

Supporters Believe This Law Would Reduce Health Care Costs and Increase Access to Eye Care.

The backers of expanding prescribing authority to optometrists say it will help reduce health care costs and make treatment more available to communities short on ophthalmologists. According to a statement by the Florida Optometric Association, expanding the ability for optometrists to prescribe oral medications saves money, increases access to eye care, and saves people from losing vision due to treatment delays. According to the Fort Myers News-Press, this authority has been granted to optometrists in 48 states.

Ophthalmologists Say Patients’ Safety is at Stake.

According to the Florida Society of Ophthalmology, allowing an expansion of prescribing authority is a dangerous move for patients. A letter from the American Academy of Ophthalmology states that the language in the legislature is vague, broad and misleading. It also states that the training ophthalmologists receive provides them with not only technical skills, but instills the judgment one needs to determine when (and when not) to prescribe specific medications. To read the entire letter, click here.

Other associations opposed to the bill include Florida Society of Interventional Pain Physicians, Florida Society of Rheumatology, Florida Society of Anesthesiologists, Hillsborough County Medical Association. Letters written by each of these societies can be read by clicking here.

Progression of the Bill. 

Florida House Bill 239 was passed by the House Health and Human Services Committee on March 7, 2013, and is now ready for the House Floor. On March 6, 2013, a Florida Senate panel voted 10-3 to approve Senate Bill 278. The bill has now been handed over to the Appropriation Committee.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced with Investigations of Optometrists and Ophthalmologists.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm provide legal representation to optometrists, ophthalmologists and other health providers in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) investigations, FBI investigations, Medicare investigations, Medicaid investigations and other types of investigations of health professionals and providers.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

What do you think of optometrists being able to prescribe oral medication? Are you for or against this legislature? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Gluck, Frank. “Not Seeing Eye to Eye: Optometrists, Ophthalmologists Differ on Bills.” Fort Myers News-Press. (March 7, 2013). From: http://www.news-press.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2013303070027&nclick_check=1

Corcoran, Richard. Letter Opposing HB 239 and SB 278. American Academy of Ophthalmology. (February 4, 2013). From: http://www.mdeye.org/pdfs/AAOHB239OppositionLetter.pdf

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

 

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.

Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

It’s the End to the Eyeball Wars-Optometrists and Ophthalmologists Come to an Agreement: Optometrists Allowed to Prescribe

1 Indest-2008-1By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

On April 4, 2013, the Florida Senate passed Florida Governor Rick Scott a hard-fought bill that would expand the drug-prescribing practices of optometrists, according to the Associated Press. House Bill 239 has pitted optometrists against ophthalmologists for years in what was called the “eyeball wars.” (Click here to read House Bill 239.) The Senate sent a measure to the governor that would allow optometrists to prescribe some medications, while adding new patient protections.

To read the article from the Associated Press, click here.

I previously blogged about this topic when the bill was still being voted on in the House. Click here to read what supporters and opponents of House Bill 239 had to say about it.

The Final Bill-Optometrists to be Allowed to Prescribe.

According to an article in the Orlando Sentinel, the final bill was an agreement between the Florida Society of Ophthalmologists and the Florida Optometric Association. Optometrists wanted to ability to prescribe medications other than ointments and creams. Ophthalmologists argued optometrists are not doctors and did not receive the proper training to prescribe medicine.

The compromise under the final bill says optometrists would be allowed to prescribe 14 oral drugs, including antibiotics. However, optometrists will not be allowed to prescribe controlled substances. The measure clarifies that optometrists cannot perform surgeries and requires them to report any bad medical outcomes to the state, as ophthalmologists are required to do.

Click here to read the entire article from the Orlando Sentinel.

Hopes for House Bill 239.

State Senators voted 40-0 to pass the bill. Optometrists believed that House Bill 239 will help Floridians get the most appropriate eye treatment. This bill will also allegedly help cut down on duplicate services, and in return, reduce costs for patients.

If Governor Scott signs the bill, it will officially put an end this turf war over eyes.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced with Investigations of Optometrists and Ophthalmologists.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm provide legal representation to optometrists, ophthalmologists and other health providers in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) investigations, FBI investigations, Medicare investigations, Medicaid investigations and other types of investigations of health professionals and providers.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

What do you think of the new bill? Do you think optometrists prescribing medication is a good idea or a bad idea? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Associated Press. “Bill Expands Prescribing Powers for Optometrists.” The Tampa Bay Tribune. (April 4, 2013). From: http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/F/FL_XGR_OPTOMETRISTS_FLOL-?SITE=FLTAM&SECTION=STATE&TEMPLATE=

Haughney, Kathleen. “Eyeball Wars Comes to an End.” Orlando Sentinel. (April 4, 2013). From: http://blogs.orlandosentinel.com/news_politics/?p=42985

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Florida Supreme Court Overturns Medical Malpractice Caps

6 Indest-2008-3By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Florida’s Supreme Court ruled 5-to-2 in favor of invalidating medical malpractice caps on non-economic damages. The initial legislation was put into place in 2003 by the Florida Legislature due to an alleged medical malpractice crisis. The caps limited payments to patients for non-economic damages at $500,000 in most malpractice cases and $1 million in cases involving deaths. However, on March 13, 2014, the Supreme Court concluded that the cap on wrongful death non-economic damages violates the state Constitution’s equal protection clause.

This decision by Florida’s highest court makes Florida the seventh state to make such a ruling that such limitations are unconstitutional. There are 35 states that currently have some type of cap on medical malpractice awards.

This decision stirs up harsh criticism from doctors, and praise from trial attorneys.

History of the Caps on Medical Malpractice Lawsuits.

The damages caps were initiated in 2003 by former Governor Jeb Bush, backed by doctors, hospitals and insurance companies. Supporters argued that reforms were needed to curb the outbreak of medical malpractice costs. The caps were also initiated in an effort to lower the cost of malpractice insurance rates and to keep doctors from moving out of the state. According to Health News Florida with the caps, the number of medical malpractice lawsuits fell, which was interpreted as a sign that the caps discouraged trivial lawsuits. To read the entire article from Health News Florida, click here.

Harsh Words from Florida Medical Association.

The Florida Medical Association (FMA) President Alan Harmon, M.D., wasted no time in releasing a statement of discontent. In a press release Dr. Harmon stated, “The FMA is extremely disappointed in the Supreme Court’s decision. This decision imperils our considerable efforts to make Florida the best state in the nation for physicians to practice medicine and for patients to receive care.”

Dr. Harmon mentions that without caps to help regulate out-of-control litigation, many physicians may move out of the state, and few out-of-state physicians will look to locate to Florida.

To read the full press release from Dr. Harmon, click here.

What This Means for Health Care Professionals.

Now that medical malpractice caps are gone, trial lawyers will be refocusing on lawsuits. Health care professionals need to carefully evaluate each patient before treatment begins, even consulting with specialists when necessary. Detailed documentation is also important. Make sure everything is properly charted in the patient’s medical record. As a health care professional, its important to have an open line of communication with your patient, so that he or she knows and understands his or her medical treatment.

Get Professional Liability Insurance Now.

It is now more important than ever to have good professional liability insurance. The truth of the matter is that all health care professionals should protect themselves by obtaining a personal professional liability insurance policy. A good policy will provide medical malpractice and, very importantly, licensure protection coverage. The cost on these policies varies, but it is generally quite affordable, often costing little more that $10 to $15 a month. If you do not already have it, call Healthcare Providers Service Organization (HPSO), Lloyd’s of London, CPH & Associates Insurance, or another insurance company to discuss obtaining professional liability insurance.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Health Care Professionals and Providers.

Our firm regularly represents physicians, dentists, nurse practitioners, pharmacists, massage therapists, mental health counselors, registered nurses (RNs), assisted living facilities (ALFs), home health agencies (HHAs), nurse practitioners, lab technicians, occupational therapists, physical therapists (PTs), social workers, physician assistants, psychologists and other health professionals in many different legal matters.
Services we provide include representation before your professional board in Department of Health investigations, in administrative hearings, in civil litigation, in defense of malpractice claims, in professional licensing matters, in defense of allegations concerning HIPAA privacy violations and medical record breaches, in Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) actions, and in many other matters.

In cases in which the health care professional has professional liability insurance or general liability insurance which provides coverage for such matters, we will seek to obtain coverage by your insurance company and will attempt to have your legal fees and expenses covered by your insurance company. If allowed, we will agree to take an assignment of your insurance policy proceeds in order to be able to submit our bills directly to your insurance company.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

As a health care provider, how do you feel about the malpractice caps being thrown out? Will it make you think twice about taking certain cases or treating certain patients? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Gentry, Carol. “FL Malpractice Caps Thrown Out.” Health News Florida. (March 14, 2014). From: http://health.wusf.usf.edu/post/fl-malpractice-caps-thrown-out

Klas, Mary Ellen. “Florida Supreme Court Tosses Out Medical Malpractice Cap on Damages.” Tampa Bay Times. (March 13, 2014). From: http://www.tampabay.com/news/politics/florida-supreme-court-tosses-out-medical-malpractice-cap-on-damages/2170030

VanSickle, Erin. “Supreme Court Invalidates Medical Liability Caps.” Florida Medical Association. (March 13, 2014). From: http://www.flmedical.org/Supreme_Court_invalidates_caps.aspx

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

 

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2014 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

The Ins and Outs of Florida’s 2015 Legislative Session for Health Care Providers

10 Indest-2008-7George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in the Legal Specialty of Health Law

Committees are busy in Tallahassee as the 2015 Legislative Session is set to begin on March 3, 2015. For Florida physicians and other health care providers, now is the time to review the legislative bills that could affect you and your practice. There are many bills pending that could impact the future of medical practice and health care delivery in Florida.

On the table are some recognizable bills from last year, as well as a few new ones. To stay up to date on the 2015 Legislative Session as it relates to health care, check this blog regularly.

Bills Up for Consideration.

The two most profiled issues from the 2014 Legislative Session are back.

– House Bill (HB) 547 and the companion Senate bill (SB) 614 would give nurse practitioners the ability to prescribe controlled substances. It would also expand their scope of practice, which would exempt them from the requirement that certain medical acts be performed or supervised by a physician. To learn more on this bill, click here for our previous blog.

– HB 545 and the companion Senate bill SB 478 defines what is determined to be telemedicine or telehealth. These bills call for coverage in Medicaid programs. Lawmakers state an agreement has been made to require health care providers to be licensed in Florida to provide telemedicine in the state. House and Senate leaders have expressed confidence they will reach an agreement this year on telemedicine. Click here to learn more on telemedicine in Florida.

Each bill could dramatically change the landscape of the practice of Florida medicine.

Keep an Eye on These Additional Bills.

Other pending bills that could impact the delivery of health care in Florida, include:

– SB 516 addresses insurance coverage and reimbursement issues for emergency services;

– HB 279 would allow pharmacy interns to administer vaccinations to adults;

– HB 281 and SB 532 would allow licensed physician assistants under physician supervision to order controlled substances in the hospital setting; and

– HB 515 and SB 710 revise the scope of physical therapists and prohibit individuals with doctorates in physical therapy to present themselves as a doctor without informing the public of his or her actual profession as a physical therapist.

In Conclusion.

The 2015 Legislative Session is packed with bills that, if approved, will affect physicians, physician assistants, nurses, and other health care providers. As a health care provider, knowing the ins and outs of these bills can save you from the headache and possible fines that could come from non-compliance. We urge you to become involved with these issues. If you would like to know more, you can contact your local medical society. Again, we will stay on top of the progress of these bills, so check this blog regularly.

Contact Experienced Health Law Attorneys.

The Health Law Firm routinely represents physicians, pharmacists, pharmacies, optometrists, nurses and other health providers in investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, HIPAA complaints and violations, NPDB actions, inspections and audits involving the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Department of Health (DOH) and other law enforcement agencies. Its attorneys include those who are board certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law as well as licensed health professionals who are also attorneys.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources:

Stone, Rick. “PAs, Nurse Practitioners Could Get Prescribing Authority.” Health News Florida. (February 11, 2015). From: http://health.wusf.usf.edu/post/pas-nurse-practitioners-could-get-prescribing-authority?utm_source=Health+News+Florida+eAlert+subscriber+list&utm_campaign=e231ee3f8a-Friday_February_13_20152_13_2015&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_8d22eaa6f6-e231ee3f8a-249582973

Saunders, Jim. “Telemedicine Deal Likely in 2015, Legislators Say.” Orlando Sentinel. (February 3, 2014). From: http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/politics/os-florida-telemedicine-deal-20150203-story.html

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1999-2015 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

New Recreational Marijuana Amendment Being Pushed in Florida

10 Indest-2008-7By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

There is a new effort to legalize the use of marijuana for adults in Florida and not just for medical purposes. The two groups, The Florida Cannabis Action Network and Floridians For Freedom, are pushing for a new recreational marijuana amendment in Florida. Petitions will soon hit the streets for a proposed constitutional amendment that would completely legalize use, possession and cultivation of marijuana by Florida adults.

Getting on the 2016 Ballot.

The Florida Cannabis Action Network, along with a committee called Floridians For Freedom, stated that it had received state approval to begin seeking signatures which would get their measure on the ballot in November 2016. This measure is distinct from a previous amendment led by Orlando Lawyer John Morgan, who wanted to legalize marijuana for medical purposes only.

Floridians For Freedom will have to gather more than 67,000 valid signatures to get the effort to the next phase which is Florida Supreme Court review. Then the group will have to gather an additional 600,000 valid signatures to get it qualified for the ballot next fall. To visit their website, click here.

“Ending Prohibition” of Marijuana Under State Law.

According to Jodi James, chair of Floridians For Freedom and executive director of the Florida Cannabis Action Network, the commercial aspects of marijuana would be controlled by rules and regulations set by the Florida Legislature and Department of Commerce. “We want it to be legal. We want it to be regulated. We want it controlled. We want people to have safe access,” James said.

The Florida Cannabis Action Network currently has 20,000 members that it will call on to help collect valid signatures. To read one of our previous blogs on marijuana policy, click here.

Be sure to check The Health Law Firm’s Medical Marijuana Law Blog regularly to stay updated on this hot topic.

Comments?

What are your thoughts on making marijuana completely legalized? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Contact Experienced Health Law Attorneys for Medical Marijuana Concerns.

The Health Law Firm attorneys can assist health care providers and facilities, such as doctors, pharmacists and pharmacies, wanting to participate in the medical marijuana industry. We can properly draft and complete the applications for registration, permitting and/or licensing, while complying with Florida law. We can also represent doctors, pharmacies and pharmacists facing proceedings brought by state regulators or agencies.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Source:

Powers, Scott. “Group to push amendment that would completely legalize marijuana.” Orlando Sentinel. (September 2, 2015). Print.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

KeyWords: Legalize marijuana, Florida medical marijuana, medical cannabis, medical marijuana, medical marijuana lawyer, medical marijuana license, defense attorney, defense lawyer, health lawyer, marijuana, recreational cannabis, recreational marijuana, marijuana cultivation, Floridians For Freedom, Florida, Cannabis Action Network, commercial use of marijuana, Florida Legislature, Department of Commerce, The Health Law Firm

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2015 The Health Law firm. All rights reserved.

Florida Legislature Reforms Pharmacy Benefit Manager Audit Practices

1 Indest-2008-1According to the Florida Legislature, it’s time for pharmacists to focus on their patients instead of paperwork. On June 13, 2014, Florida Governor Rick Scott signed Florida Senate Bill 702 into law. This law introduces clear guidelines of acceptable audit practices of pharmacies in the Sunshine State.

There are more than 2,700 pharmacies across Florida that are routinely evaluated by Pharmacy Benefit Managers (PBMs). The purpose of these audits is to verify that certain claims are submitted and handled properly. If a PBM audit uncovers fraud or abuse, the pharmacy will be subject to penalties, including reimbursement of amounts paid. With the increase of rules regulating pharmacies, these audits have progressively become more time consuming for pharmacists.

Florida SB 702 becomes effective on October 1, 2014. To read a summary of the law, click here.

What’s the Need of the New Law?

In the United States, a PBM is most often a third party administrator of prescription drug programs. The PBM is primarily responsible for processing and paying prescription drug claims.
Currently, PBMs have broad discretion to penalize pharmacies. This means that pharmacies can be forced to pay thousands of dollars as the result of basic clerical or typographical mistakes, many of which are not the fault of the pharmacist or pharmacy staff. This law was enacted to provide reasonable standards for pharmacy audits while allowing PBMs to continue penalizing for true fraud and abuse.

Pharmacy Rights Included in New Law.

SB 702 makes common-sense auditing standards that include:

–    At least seven days advance notice before an on-site audit is conducted;
–    On-site audits scheduled after the first three days of the month;
–    A limit on the audit period of 24 months after the date claim is submitted;
–    Audits requiring clinical judgment must be conducted by or with a pharmacist;
–    Use of written practitioner records to validate pharmacy records in accordance with state and federal law;
–    Reimbursement of claims retroactively denied for clerical, typographical or computer errors unless pharmacy has a pattern of fraudulent billing;
–    Delivery of initial audit reports to pharmacists within 120 days after an audit is completed;
–    Receipt of final audit report within six months of the preliminary report;
–    Allowing 10 days for pharmacists to provide documentation to address any discrepancies found during an audit;
–    Prohibiting the use of extrapolations in auditing claims; and
–    The Office of Insurance Regulation will study pharmacy complaints of willful violations of audit provisions by PBMs.

Stipulation of Rights.

The rights listed above do not apply to audits that are based on suspicions of fraud or willful misrepresentation; audits of claims paid for by federally funded programs; or concurrent reviews or desk audits that occur within three business days after transmission where no chargeback or recoupment is demanded.

An entity that audits a pharmacy located within a Health Care Fraud Prevention and Enforcement Action Team Task Force area designated by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) is not required to provide seven days prior notice of an audit if the pharmacy has been a member of a credentialed provider network for less than 12 months.

What This Means for You.

For once there is a new law that does not make a pharmacist’s job more complicated. This law may actually alleviate some of the stress that comes with dealing with an audit. We’re hoping with the implementation of this law pharmacists will be able to spend more time focusing on patient care.

Comments?

What do you think of this new law? Will it affect your pharmacy? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Pharmacies and Pharmacists.

The Health Law Firm represents pharmacists and pharmacies in DEA, DOH and FDA investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, administrative hearings, inspections and audits. The firm’s attorneys include those who are board certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law as well as licensed health professionals who are also attorneys.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

 

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Florida Toughens Up Drug Compounding Law for Out-of-State Pharmacies

8 Indest-2008-5By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

A new, stricter law on Florida’s compounding pharmacy industry took effect October 1, 2014.
The new law increases the restrictions for out-of-state compounding pharmacies and outsourcing facilities that ship medications into Florida. The law also gives the Florida Board of Pharmacy and Florida Department of Health (DOH) more power to oversee and penalize these companies. Click here to read the new law.

The law was enacted to increase the standards for compounding pharmacies that create medications that are supposed to be tailored to the needs of individual patients. In an effort to prevent another nationwide outbreak of fungal meningitis, similar efforts to tighten control on compounding pharmacies have been implemented by other states across the country. Click here to read a prior blog on the fungal meningitis outbreak.

The Lowdown on the New Law.

The bill requires an out-of-state compounding pharmacy or an outsourcing facility to obtain a nonresident sterile compounding permit before shipping products into Florida. Any currently-registered nonresident pharmacies must be permitted by February 28, 2015. However, all compounded sterile products shipped, mailed, delivered, or dispensed into the Sunshine State must meet Florida’s standards for sterile compounding.

The law establishes application and inspection requirements for the nonresident sterile compounding permit, as well as increased responsibilities for the Florida DOH and the Board of Pharmacy.

Under the law, the Florida DOH and Board of Pharmacy are given enhanced oversight for these out-of-state compounding pharmacies, including the authority to inspect a pharmacy or sterile compounding permittee; the cost of which is picked up by the pharmacy or permittee. The Board is authorized to discipline a nonresident pharmacy for conduct which causes or could cause serious injury, without waiting 180 days for the resident state to act. The Board is also authorized to discipline nonresident pharmacies and sterile compounding permittees for specified acts of noncompliance.

New Standards Triggered by Tainted Compounded Medications.

These new standards are being implemented two years after a nationwide outbreak of fungal meningitis linked to contaminated drugs made by a compounding pharmacy in Massachusetts. Florida is no stranger to allegations of tainted compounded products. In May 2012, Franck’s pharmacy in Ocala, Florida, was accused of distributing eye medications that contained a fungal infection. To read more: click here for the first blog and here for the second blog.

It’s likely these new permits are a direct result of the recent issues with compounded medications and compounding pharmacies. The goal of these permits is to help authorities, such as the DOH and the Board of Pharmacy, track pharmacies compounding sterile products.

Comments?

What do you think of the law to increase restrictions on out-of-state compounding pharmacies that ship medications into Florida? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Pharmacies and Pharmacists.

The Health Law Firm represents pharmacists and pharmacies in DEA, DOH and FDA investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, administrative hearings, inspections and audits. The firm’s attorneys include those who are board certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law as well as licensed health professionals who are also attorneys.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources:

Shedden, Mary. “Tougher Compounding Rules Finally Law.” Health News Florida. (September 30, 2014). From: http://bit.ly/1xBQtS0

Florida House Bill 7077

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

 

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2014 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Purpose of Florida E-FORCSE Prescription Database Not for Disciplinary or Criminal Prosecution Purposes Against Physicians, Pharmacists or Other Health Professionals

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

8 Indest-2008-5As you are no doubt aware now, Florida has an active prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP). It is called the “Electronic-Florida Online Reporting of Controlled Substances Evaluation” or “E-FORCSE.” More often it is referred to simply as the “prescription drug database” by Florida physicians.

The Florida Legislature adopted the E-FORCSE system in Florida by Section 893.055, Florida Statutes.

Section 893.055(7)(b), Florida Statutes, States Access to Program’s Database is Limited to Program Manager.

A pharmacy, prescriber, or dispenser shall have access to information in the prescription drug monitoring program’s database which relates to a patient of that pharmacy, prescriber, or dispenser in a manner established by the department as needed for the purpose of reviewing the patient’s controlled substance prescription history. Other access to the program’s database shall be limited to the program’s manager and to the designated program and support staff, who may act only at the direction of the program manager or, in the absence of the program manager, as authorized. Access by the program manager or such designated staff is for prescription drug program management only or for management of the program’s database and its system in support of the requirements of this section and in furtherance of the prescription drug monitoring program. Confidential and exempt information in the database shall be released only as provided in paragraph (c) and s. 893.0551. . . .

Data from E-FORCSE Not Intended to be Used to Bring Disciplinary Action Against Health Care Practitioners.

Most notably, it was not the intent of the Legislature for any state or federal agency to use the data from the E-FORCSE system primarily as evidence for the purpose of taking licensure or disciplinary action against physicians, dentists, pharmacists or other licensed health professionals.

Unfortunately, we have seen cases where, contrary to the Legislature’s intent, data from E-FORCSE has been recited in a case against a licensed health professional as an example of “substandard performance,” “falling below the standard of care,” or professional “negligence.” Additionally, we have been informed of the alleged use of the E-FORCSE system by state and federal law enforcement authorities in criminal investigations and prosecutions of licensed health professionals. However, the exact wording of Sections 893.055 and 893.0551, Florida Statutes, should be carefully analyzed in determining under what conditions access and use of the information are authorized.

Defending Against E-FORCSE Data’s Being Used Against a Health Care Practitioner.

If you are a physician, dentist or pharmacist, and data from E-FORCSE is used in or discussed in any complaint investigation, license investigation, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) investigation, criminal investigation, administrative complaint, charge sheet or indictment, you should ask your attorney to research the advisability of filing a motion to strike it. In addition, your attorney should also consider filing a motion in limine, before any major hearing or trial, to exclude all use or mention of the data and E-FORCSE system.

In addition, the attorney for the licensed health professional may explore the possibility of moving to exclude any and all information and evidence derived from the unauthorized use of the E-FORCSE databank under the “fruit of the poisonous tree” doctrine. To date, we have not seen any cases where this has been done.

Again the exact language of Sections 893.055 and 893.0551, Florida Statutes, should be consulted to determine whether access and use have been properly authorized.

Information on Florida’s Prescription Drug Monitoring Program from the Florida Department of Health.

The information below is taken from an informational pamphlet distributed by the Florida Department of Health (DOH) called “E-FORCSE; Florida’s Prescription Drug Monitoring Program.” It is available online, at www.e-forcse.com.

Florida’s Prescription Drug Monitoring Program Facts.

E-FORCSE will take in controlled substance dispensing data from pharmacies and health care practitioners, and will make the information available to all health care practitioners who can then use the database to guide their decisions when prescribing and dispensing certain highly-abused prescription drugs. With this information, health care practitioners may be able to identify patients who are “doctor shopping”—obtaining multiple prescriptions for the same controlled substance from multiple health care practitioners. Doctor shopping is a felony in Florida.

Who is Required to Report Controlled Substance Dispensing Information to E-FORCSE?

Any health care practitioner who has dispensed a controlled substance in schedule II, III and IV, as defined in section 893.03, Florida Statutes-like OxyContin, Percocet, Vicodine, etc., will be required to report to the database. This includes pharmacies licensed under chapter 465, Florida Statutes, (including mail order and Internet pharmacies that dispense controlled substances into Florida) and health care practitioners licensed under chapters 458, 459, 461, 462, 465, or 466, Florida Statutes.

Who is Not Required to Report Controlled Substance Dispensing Information to E-FORCSE?

A health care practitioner who:

– Administers a controlled substance directly to a patient if the amount is adequate to treat the patient during that particular treatment session;
– Administers a controlled substance to a patient or resident receiving care as a patient, at a hospital, nursing home, ambulatory surgical center, hospice or intermediate care facility for the developmentally disabled;
– Administers or dispenses a controlled substance in the health care system of the Florida Department of Corrections;
– Administers a controlled substance in the emergency room of a licensed hospital;
– Administers or dispenses a controlled substance to a patient under the age of 16; and
– Dispenses a one-time, 72-hour re-supply of a controlled substance.

How Can E-FORCSE Help Improve a Patient’s Standard of Care?

– It allows the health care practitioners to choose and prescribe controlled substances that will not negatively interact with medicines prescribed by other health care practitioners.
– Pharmacists can determine for their patients if their health care practitioners have prescribed controlled substances that might negatively interact when used together.
– Health care practitioners can determine if their patient has had multiple prescriptions for the same drugs from multiple health care practitioners. This identifies those patients potentially engaged in the crime of doctor shopping. When health care practitioners intervene, they can help their patients find treatment.

How Can E-FORCSE Help Improve the Public Health of Florida?

Health care practitioners can identify a potentially illegal diversion pattern for drugs when they request and receive a Patient Activity Report (PAR). A PAR can alert health care practitioners to doctor shopping. In addition, this information can assist law enforcement, medical regulatory boards and the Attorney General’s Medicaid Fraud Control Unit (MFCU) with active investigations into criminal activity regarding controlled prescription drugs.

Who Has Access to the Information Stored in E-FORCSE?

A health care practitioner who is subject to licensure or regulation by the DOH under chapter 458, chapter 459, chapter 461, chapter 462, chapter 464, chapter 465, or chapter 466, Florida Statutes, will have direct access to their specific patient’s information. Other direct access to information will be limited to the E-FORCSE program manager and designated staff for the purpose of program management.

Indirect access may be requested by the following organizations upon being verified and authenticated by E-FORCSE staff.

– DOH or appropriate health care regulatory boards who are involved in a specific investigation involving a designated individual for one or more prescribed controlled substances;
– The Attorney General (AG) for Medicaid fraud cases involving prescribed controlled substances; and
– A law enforcement agency during active investigations regarding potential criminal activity, fraud or theft of prescribed controlled substances.

Are Health Care Practitioners Required to Access E-FORCSE Before Prescribing a Controlled Substance?

Health care practitioners will not be required to access E-FORCSE before prescribing a controlled substance. It will be voluntary; however, physicians are encouraged to use it as a tool to improve patient care.

Is E-FORCSE Compliant with the Federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)?

Yes, in addition to meeting the federal HIPAA requirements, E-FORCSE will meet all required DOH security requirements.

What is the Penalty for Disclosure of Confidential Information in the E-FORCSE Database?

A health care practitioner or other individual who has access to the information in the E-FORCSE database who discloses confidential information will be committing a third-degree felony.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced with Investigations of Health Professionals and Providers.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm provide legal representation to physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, CRNAs, pain management doctors, dentists, pharmacists, psychologists and other health providers in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) investigations, FBI investigations, Medicare investigations, Medicaid investigations and other types of investigations of health professionals and providers.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

As a health care practitioner, do you use E-FORCSE? Why or why not? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

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“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2015 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Will Florida Senate Be Pressured into Expanding the Authority of Nurses?

indest1By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

On April 28, 2014, the Connecticut House of Representatives approved a bill giving nurse practitioners greater autonomy to diagnose and treat patients without doctors’ oversight. Connecticut is one out of 17 states and the District of Columbia to allow nurse practitioners to work independently of physicians. Similar measures are pending in several other states, including Florida.

The Florida House of Representatives passed the bill (CS/CS/HB 7113) on April 25, 2014, that expands the range of practice for Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs). The bill is expected to be heard in the Florida Senate soon. If passed, this policy shift would likely lead to profound changes in the way health care is practiced in Florida.

Details of the Florida Bill.

Currently, in Florida, nurse practitioners must work under the supervision of physicians. This bill would change the title of what are usually called nurse practitioners or advanced registered nurse practitioners. These are registered nurses who have post-college education, usually a master’s degree. The proposed change would retitle these health professionals to advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs).

These nurses would gain new authority under the bill, such as the ability to sign documents that now require a physician’s signature, and the opportunity to earn the title “Independent Advance Practice Registered Nurse” after a certain amount of training and experience. Nurse practitioners would no longer have to contract with and pay a “supervising” physician. Another somewhat controversial aspect of the bill is to allow these nurses to gain the authority to prescribe controlled substances.

Increasing Pressure to Pass Similar Bill.

The present Florida bill is being supported as a means to fulfill the anticipated growing need for medical services expected with the implementation of the Affordable Care Act. Especially in certain segments of the medical population, APRNs are already providing a large amount of this care, and the bill acknowledges and grants the authority for this.

With so many states, especially up in the northeast, agreeing to expand the scope of practice to qualified nurse practitioners, we wonder if this will have an effect on the Senate vote in Florida. Snow birds coming to Florida will be comfortable being treated by nurse practitioners and will expect the same level of care when they come down to the Sunshine State.

Opposition May Kill the Bill.

The opposition to this effort is strong and vocal, with the various state medical associations leading the way. For these groups, the issue is one of preservation of the practice of medicine as the domain of the physician. They are accepting of medical practice by physician “extenders,” but not by “providers” who are not physicians. The members of these opposition groups are a formidable force, respected in their communities and able to make significant political contributions. These are not groups that many legislators would want to rankle.

However, a review of the history of medicine in the United States shows that this is a battle the medical doctors are likely to lose. Similar arguments have been made in the past when other types of health care practitioners have sought legal authority to practice their professions. Immediately coming to mind are osteopathic physicians (D.O.s), chiropractic physicians (D.C.s) and midwives (CMs) to name a few. Some have had to bring antitrust lawsuits to obtain relief.

Be sure to check this blog regularly for updates to this story.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Nurses.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent registered nurses, nurse practitioners, advanced practice registered nurses, certified registered nurse anesthetists, midwives and licensed practical nurses in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, in appearances before the Board of Nursing in licensing matters and in many other legal matters. We represent nurses across the U.S., and throughout Florida.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

What are your thoughts on the bill? Do you think nurse practitioners should have more autonomy? Or do you believe nurse practitioners should be supervised by physicians? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Altimari, Daniela. “State Moves to Give Nurses Independence From Doctors.” The Courant. (April 28, 2014). From: http://www.courant.com/health/connecticut/hc-aprn-bill-20140428,0,7595375.story

Catala, Paul. “Bill Giving Nurses More Authority Passes House.” Highlands Today. (April 28, 2014). From: http://highlandstoday.com/hi/local-news/bill-giving-nurses-more-authority-passes-house-20140429/

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

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