Under Medical Peer Review from the Military or the VA? Get Experienced Legal Representation Now

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law
Our firm is often consulted by military physicians, Veterans Administration (VA) physicians, and former military and VA physicians concerning matters involving peer reviews of their care. In the military, whether Army, Navy, or Air Force, peer review for all physicians is now governed by one general department. The Department of Defense (DOD) Regulation, that is, Defense Health Agency Procedures Manual (abbreviated DHA PM) 6025.13, became effective October 1, 2019. VA physicians have different, but somewhat similar regulations that apply to them.
We are often consulted by these physicians, who no longer serve with those agencies, or after action has already been taken to report them to the National Practitioner Data Bank (NPDB) for allegedly substandard care. Such reports go into the NPDB for fifty (50) years and […]

Under Medical Peer Review from the Military or the VA? Get Experienced Legal Representation Now

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law
Our firm is often consulted by military physicians, Veterans Administration (VA) physicians, and former military and VA physicians concerning matters involving peer reviews of their care. In the military, whether Army, Navy, or Air Force, peer review for all physicians is now governed by one general department. The Department of Defense (DOD) Regulation, that is, Defense Health Agency Procedures Manual (abbreviated DHA PM) 6025.13, became effective October 1, 2019. VA physicians have different, but somewhat similar regulations that apply to them.
We are often consulted by these physicians, who no longer serve with those agencies, or after action has already been taken to report them to the National Practitioner Data Bank (NPDB) for allegedly substandard care. Such reports go into the NPDB for fifty (50) years and […]

Additional Negative Consequences for Discipline on Your Professional License, Part 1 of 2

Attorney and Author HeadshotBy George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Do you have a medical, pharmacist, counselor, or nursing license in more than one state?  Do you have a license in more than one profession?  Have you been notified that an investigation has been opened against your professional license?  Are you thinking about resigning your professional license or voluntarily relinquishing (giving up) your license?  Then you should be aware of some important facts you may not have known.

First, you should never voluntarily relinquish or resign your professional license after you know that an investigation has been opened or that disciplinary action has been taken against you.  A resignation is considered to be a “disciplinary relinquishment” and is treated the same as if your license had been revoked on disciplinary grounds.

Second, this will be […]

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Fight Back in National Practitioner Data Bank Disputes and Appeal Adverse Reports

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

The National Practitioner Data Bank (NPDB), created in 1986, was part of the Health Care Quality Improvement Act (HCQIA). Its purpose is to improve the quality of health care by encouraging state licensing boards, hospitals, health care entities, and professional societies to report into a national data bank those physicians and health professionals who demonstrate substandard skills or engage in unprofessional behavior.  In part, it is used to make sure that incompetent physicians do not move from one state to another in order to avoid the consequences.

Adverse Reports Stay in the NPDB for Life.

How long does an adverse NPDB report stay in the Data Bank?  I have received two (2) different answers to this question from different authorities.  I was originally informed that adverse NPDB reports […]

NPDB Disputes and Appeals: Fight Back Against Adverse Reports

Attorney and Author HeadshotBy George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

The National Practitioner Data Bank (NPDB), created in 1986, was part of the Health Care Quality Improvement Act (HCQIA). Its purpose is to improve the quality of health care by encouraging state licensing boards, hospitals, health care entities, and professional societies to report into a national data bank those physicians and health professionals who demonstrate substandard skills or engage in unprofessional behavior. In part, it is used to make sure that incompetent physicians do not move from one state to another in order to avoid the consequences.

Adverse Reports Stay in the NPDB for Life.

How long does an adverse NPDB report stay in the Data Bank? I have received two (2) different answers to this question from different authorities. I was originally informed that […]

U.S. District Court in Texas Orders Hospital to Void Report to National Practitioner Data Bank

George Indest HeadshotBy George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

On February 8, 2017, the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Texas, issued a Memorandum Opinion and Order directing Memorial Health System of East Texas (Memorial Health) to submit a Void Report to the National Practitioner Data Bank (NPDB). In the case Walker v. Memorial Health System, the court found the initial report, submitted after 30 days of an uncompleted proctoring requirement, to be improperly submitted because the Hospital had not specified that the proctoring take not less than 30 days.

Following a peer review process, Memorial Health ordered Dr. Walker to “have five bowel surgery cases proctored,” specifying no time limit. After a month, when the surgeon hadn’t met the five-case requirement, the hospital filed an adverse report with the NPDB. Dr. […]

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