Appellate Court Reverses Nursing Board’s Revocation of License For Florida Nurse; “Due Process Rights Violated” Says Court of Appeal

George IndestBy George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

On September 22, 2022, Florida’s First District Court of Appeal reversed a final administrative order from the Board of Nursing, saying that the state agencies engaged in “a game of bait and switch” when revoking a Florida nurse’s license. As a result, the discipline imposed on the nurse, revocation of her nursing license, is reversed. The appeals court said that the Florida Board of Nursing violated the nurse’s due process rights by imposing a penalty for violating patient confidentiality when she was only charged with having her license suspended in another state.

Details About the Case.

In 2018, the Florida Department of Health (DOH) filed a complaint and an amended complaint against the nurse. According to the DOH, she violated section 464.018(1)(b) by having her license to practice nursing in another state suspended. However, the Florida state nursing board issued a final order permanently revoking her Florida license, a punishment that was not within the regulatory guidelines that the Board of Nursing had previously adopted for the offense with which she was charged.

Also, the nurse had originally requested a formal hearing. She was allegedly informed she was not entitled to a formal hearing and was not notified she should appear when the Board of Nursing held the informal hearing on her case.

The nurse claimed the actions by the Florida DOH and the Florida Board of Nursing deprived her of her right to due process of law according to the U.S. Constitution’s Fifth Amendment, as applied to the states through the Fourteenth Amendment. The appellate court agreed.

State Agencies Not Communicating?

According to the court opinion, the Board and the DOH engaged in a “bait and switch game.” The state’s DOH allegedly failed to notify her of all the alleged violations that later led to the permanent revocation of her nursing license. The opinion of the appellate court stated: “More egregious than this, there was no mention in the amended complaint of an alleged violation of section 464.018(1)(h), [of Florida Statutes,] pertaining to her allegedly unprofessional conduct. In essence, the Board punished Appellant [the nurse] for this uncharged violation.”

Moreover, the appellate court said that the DOH applied the wrong disciplinary guideline for the uncharged violation. The applicable guideline only authorized a fine of up to $500 and probation as the maximum penalty. See Rule 64B9-8.006(3)(f)3, Florida Administrative Code (2012).

Based on these findings, the three-judge appellate panel reversed the revocation order, remanding it for further proceedings. Read the entire Florida court opinion on our website.

Click here to read our blog to learn more about state and DOH investigations that could help save your professional license.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Board of Nursing Cases.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent nurses in Department of Health investigations, before the Board of Nursing, in appearances before the Board of Nursing in licensing matters, in formal and informal administrative hearings, and in appeals of Final Orders.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or toll free (888) 331-6620 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources:

Dunn, Allison. “State Agencies Engaged in ‘Game of Bait-and-Switch’ When Revoking Nursing License, Florida Appeals Court Rules.” Daily Business Review. (September 22, 2022). Web.

Pazanowski, Mary Ann. “Florida Nurse Gets New Hearing in License Revocation Dispute.” Bloomberg Law. (September 21, 2022). Web.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave. Suite 1000, Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620 or toll-free (888) 331-6620.

Attorney Positions with The Health Law Firm. The Health Law Firm is always looking for qualified attorneys interested in health law practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. If you are a member of The Florida Bar and are interested, forward a cover letter and your resume to: PAlexander@TheHealthLawFirm.com or fax to: (407) 331-3030.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of and a registered service mark of The Health Law Firm, P.A., a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 2022 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

 

New Jersey Appeals Court Says Plaintiffs Don’t Need Affidavit to Sue LPN in Medical Malpractice Cases

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

In a precedent-setting case, on November 9, 2022, for the first time, a New Jersey appeals court ruled that plaintiffs in medical malpractice cases do not need an affidavit of merit before filing a claim against a licensed practical nurse (LPN). In many states, Florida included, licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and registered nurses (RNs) are included in coverage by the state’s medical malpractice pre-suit screening act. This requires a plaintiff to conduct a pre-suit screening and obtain an affidavit of expert opinion from a similar expert witness that states that the nurse has committed malpractice that harmed the patient. without such an affidavit, the suit is not permitted.

No distinction is usually made between the rights of a licensed practical nurse and a registered nurse. After all, they both are required to have licenses from the state.

In this case, the Superior Court of New Jersey,  Appellate Division, said that an LPN is not included in the “licensed person” definition under the state’s affidavit of merit statute. Additionally, the court’s opinion stated that an LPN could not use the lack of such an affidavit to dodge a medical malpractice suit. In this case, the malpractice suit was brought by a widower who says his wife died due to bad advice given by the LPN about how to treat his wife’s pain.

The Details of the Lawsuit.

The plaintiff claimed that the defendant (an LPN) responded to his complaints about his wife being in pain and unable to eat following her colon surgery by blaming the issue on “post-operative gas. “After ignoring numerous messages he left regarding her condition, the LPN allegedly told the husband (plaintiff) to give his wife, Pepto Bismol. The following day, his wife died, according to the lawsuit.

In July 2020, the plaintiff filed a medical malpractice claim as his wife’s estate administrator. The lawsuit originally named as defendants the doctor, Virtua Surgical Group, and an unknown nurse. Following discovery in the case, the plaintiff dismissed the claims against the other defendants and named only the LPN as a defendant. According to the appellate opinion, he alleged that the defendant was negligent in providing medical advice and failing to consult with her doctor.

You can view the court’s opinion in full here on our website.

Is a Licensed Practical Nurse a “Licensed Person” Covered by the Statute?

In New Jersey professional negligence cases, plaintiffs must file an “affidavit of merit,” or AOM, signed by a licensed medical professional with training or credentials similar to those of the professional to be sued. This comes from a tort reform law passed by the state government in 1995. The statute was originally designed to provide a balance between reducing frivolous lawsuits and permitting injured plaintiffs recovery for meritorious claims. It is similar to requirements that exist in many states.

According to the appellate court’s opinion, a plaintiff claiming “malpractice or negligence by a licensed person” must file an “affidavit of an appropriate licensed person” who can attest that there is a “reasonable probability” that defendant’s conduct “fell outside acceptable professional or occupational standards or treatment practices.” This is required before an actual suit is allowed.

The defendant argued that since the nursing portion of the statute defines “the practice of nursing” for “a registered professional nurse,” the Legislature intended for licensed practical nurses to be included. However, the appeals court held that the tort reform package would not protect her from the lawsuit because she did not fall within the definition in the law. She was not a registered professional nurse. Instead, she was a different type of nurse.

In his written opinion for the court, New Jersey Superior Court Judge Robert J. Gilson considered whether a licensed practical nurse is a “licensed person” covered under the AOM statute. “The AOM statute expressly uses the term ‘a registered professional nurse.’ Yet, nowhere in that definition of a registered professional nurse is there a reference to a licensed practical nurse,” he added.

Gilson stated in the opinion that the New Jersey Legislature was aware that it had separately defined the two different types of nurses. Therefore, the statute did not apply to or protect the LPN, and the plaintiff was allowed to pursue claims without an AOM. Nevertheless, the court said, the plaintiff must still prove the defendant’s negligence to succeed.

Click here to view the opinion in full.

Click here to read one of our related blogs about legal issues LPNs often face.

The New Jersey Case is Probably Not a Precedent for Most States.

Usually, the test for whether or not malpractice or professional negligence has been committed for legal purposes is whether or not the individual is a member of a learned profession. This is usually indicated by the requirement of a professional license to practice that profession. Using this definition, both a licensed practical nurse and a licensed registered nurse are considered professionals, and their “professional negligence” is considered malpractice covered by medical (nursing) malpractice laws.

Moreover, the laws in some states, such as Florida, define which professionals are covered by their medical malpractice presuit screening act by listing the licensing laws to which the medical malpractice presuit screening act applies. Thus, in Florida, Section 766.202(4), Florida Statutes refer to those licensed by Chapter 464 (Part I), Florida Statutes. Both licensed practical nurses and registered nurses are licensed in accordance with that Chapter of Florida Statutes. Thus both are covered by the Florida Medical Malpractice Presuit Screening Act.

Contact Health Law Attorneys With Experience Representing Nurses and Handling Licensing Issues.

If you are applying for a nursing or healthcare license, have had a license suspended or revoked, or are facing imminent action against your license, you must contact an experienced healthcare attorney to assist you in defending your career. Remember, your license is your livelihood. It is not recommended that you attempt to pursue these matters without the assistance of an attorney. The Health Law Firm routinely represents nurses, physicians, dentists, medical groups, clinics, and other healthcare providers in personal and facility licensing issues. If you have received a notice that a complaint has been filed against you or that you are under investigation by the department of health or your licensing board, we routinely provide legal representation in such matters; often, there may be insurance coverage that may pay for your legal defense.

To contact The Health Law Firm, call (407) 331-6620 or toll-free (888) 331-6620 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources:

Karpan, Andrew. “No Affidavit Needed To Sue ‘Practical’ Nurses, NJ Court Says.” Law360. (November 9, 2022). Web.

Murphy, Colleen. “NJ Appeals Court: No Affidavit of Merit Needed for Negligence Claim Against Licensed Practical Nurse.” Law.com. (November 10, 2022). Web.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave. Suite 1000, Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620 or Toll-Free: (888) 331-6620.

Employment with The Health Law Firm. The Health Law Firm is always seeking qualified attorneys, paralegals and legal staff interested in health law. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. If you are a current member of The Florida Bar or a qualified legal professional or secretary, who is interested, please forward your cover letter and resume to: PAlexander@TheHealthLawFirm.com or fax them to (407) 331-3030.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of and a registered service mark of The Health Law Firm, P.A., a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 2022 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Florida Nurse Wins Reversal by Appellate Court of Nursing Board’s Revocation of License; “Due Process Rights Violated” Says Court of Appeal

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

On September 22, 2022, Florida’s First District Court of Appeal reversed a final administrative order from the Board of Nursing, saying that the state agencies engaged in “a game of bait and switch” when revoking a Florida nurse’s license. As a result, the discipline imposed on the nurse, revocation of her nursing license, is reversed. The appeals court said that the Florida Board of Nursing violated the nurse’s due process rights by imposing a penalty for violating patient confidentiality when she was only charged with having her license suspended in another state.

Details About the Case.

In 2018, the Florida Department of Health (DOH) filed a complaint and an amended complaint against the nurse. According to the DOH, she violated section 464.018(1)(b) by having her license to practice nursing in another state suspended. However, the Florida state nursing board issued a final order permanently revoking her Florida license, a punishment that was not within the regulatory guidelines that the Board of Nursing had previously adopted for the offense with which she was charged.

Also, the nurse had originally requested a formal hearing. She was allegedly informed she was not entitled to a formal hearing and was not notified she should appear when the Board of Nursing held the informal hearing on her case.

The nurse claimed the actions by the Florida DOH and the Florida Board of Nursing deprived her of her right to due process of law according to the U.S. Constitution’s Fifth Amendment, as applied to the states through the Fourteenth Amendment. The appellate court agreed.

State Agencies Not Communicating?

According to the court opinion, the Board and the DOH engaged in a “bait and switch game.” The state’s DOH allegedly failed to notify her of all the alleged violations that later led to the permanent revocation of her nursing license. The opinion of the appellate court stated: “More egregious than this, there was no mention in the amended complaint of an alleged violation of section 464.018(1)(h), [of Florida Statutes,] pertaining to her allegedly unprofessional conduct. In essence, the Board punished Appellant [the nurse] for this uncharged violation.”

Moreover, the appellate court said that the DOH applied the wrong disciplinary guideline for the uncharged violation. The applicable guideline only authorized a fine of up to $500 and probation as the maximum penalty. See Rule 64B9-8.006(3)(f)3, Florida Administrative Code (2012).

Based on these findings, the three-judge appellate panel reversed the revocation order, remanding it for further proceedings. Read the entire Florida court opinion on our website.

Click here to read our blog to learn more about state and DOH investigations that could help save your professional license.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Board of Nursing Cases.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent nurses in Department of Health investigations, before the Board of Nursing, in appearances before the Board of Nursing in licensing matters, in formal and informal administrative hearings, and in appeals of Final Orders.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or toll free (888) 331-6620 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources:

Dunn, Allison. “State Agencies Engaged in ‘Game of Bait-and-Switch’ When Revoking Nursing License, Florida Appeals Court Rules.” Daily Business Review. (September 22, 2022). Web.

Pazanowski, Mary Ann. “Florida Nurse Gets New Hearing in License Revocation Dispute.” Bloomberg Law. (September 21, 2022). Web.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave. Suite 1000, Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620 or toll-free (888) 331-6620.

Attorney Positions with The Health Law Firm. The Health Law Firm is always looking for qualified attorneys interested in health law practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. If you are a member of The Florida Bar and are interested, forward a cover letter and your resume to: PAlexander@TheHealthLawFirm.com or fax to: (407) 331-3030.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of and a registered service mark of The Health Law Firm, P.A., a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 2022 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

 

Completing an Application for a Nursing License? Here Are Some Helpful Tips!

author headshotBy George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

The process of obtaining a nursing or health care professional license is not only challenging, but it’s also time-consuming. If you have a criminal conviction or unique circumstance which may negatively impact your ability to be granted a health care license, you must consult with an experienced attorney. Your career or future depends on your ability to positively present yourself to the board.

In instances where the applicant has a criminal history, substance abuse/alcohol problem, or discipline in another state, the board members are trying to discern from the testimony if he or she is safe to practice medicine.

Don’t Face State Licensing Boards On Your Own.

If you are applying for a nursing or health care license and have had prior adverse action taken against you in another state or during your academic training, you should contact an experienced healthcare attorney to assist you in the process.

Some tips to ease the process include:

  1. After obtaining an experienced attorney, ask how to answer application questions when unclear.
  2. Submit follow-up documents in a timely manner.
  3. Make sure your address is correct and complete.
  4. Follow-up with sources sending the Board of Nursing documents.
  5. Provide answers to the questions asked, and no more.
  6. Submit corrections when it becomes apparent you need to modify an answer.

If you are in the process of applying for a nursing license or any other license in the medical field, you will want an experienced health law attorney to be on your side to guide you through the process. Let the attorneys at The Health Law Firm be there for you. Call the Health Law Firm today, visit our website, and click on Contact Us.

Contact Health Law Attorneys With Experience Representing Nurses and Handling Licensing Issues.

If you are applying for a nursing or health care license, have had a license suspended or revoked, or are facing imminent action againstlawyer sitting with nurse in front of paperwork at desk your license, you must contact an experienced healthcare attorney to assist you in defending your career. Remember, your license is your livelihood, it is not recommended that you attempt to pursue these matters without the assistance of an attorney. The Health Law Firm routinely represents nurses, physicians, dentists, medical groups, clinics, and other healthcare providers in personal and facility licensing issues.


To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or toll-free (888) 331-6620 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave. Suite 1000, Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620 or Toll-Free: (888) 331-6620.

Attorney Positions with The Health Law Firm. The Health Law Firm is always looking for qualified attorneys interested in the practice of health law. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. If you are a member of The Florida Bar and are interested, forward a cover letter and your resume to: PAlexander@TheHealthLawFirm.com or fax to: (407) 331-3030.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of and a registered service mark of The Health Law Firm, P.A., a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 2022 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

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