Terrible Things That Can Happen after Discipline on Your Pharmacist License or Resignation of a Pharmacist License after Notice of Investigation

5 Indest-2008-2By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Do you have a pharmacist license in several different states? Do you have a license in more than one health profession? Have you been notified that an investigation has been opened against you? Are you thinking about resigning your pharmacist license or voluntarily relinquishing such a license? Then you must be aware of the following.

First, you should never voluntarily relinquish or resign your license after you know that an investigation has been opened or that disciplinary action has been taken against you. Such a resignation is considered to be a “disciplinary relinquishment” and is treated the same as if your license had been revoked on disciplinary grounds.

Second, this will be reported out to other states, agencies, to the National Practitioner Data Bank (NPDB), to any certifying bodies for certifications you have and to other reporting agencies (such as the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy). Other states and other professional boards will most likely initiate disciplinary action based upon the first one.

Protect Your Pharmacist License.

The following is a list of some of the adverse actions that you can expect to be taken against you after discipline on your license or after you resign your pharmacist license after receiving notice of investigation:

1. A mandatory report to the National Practitioner Data Base (NPDB) which remains there for 50 years. Note: The Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank or HIPDB recently merged into the NPDB.

2. Must be reported to and included in the Department of Health (DOH) profile that is available to the public online (for those having one), and remains for at least ten years.

3. Any other states or jurisdictions in which the pharmacist has a license will also initiate investigation and possible disciplinary action against him or her in that jurisdiction. (Note: I have had two clients who had licenses in seven other states and all, even ones that were inactive or not renewed years ago, initiated action).

4. The Office of the Inspector General (OIG) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) will take action to exclude the provider from the Medicare Program. If this occurs (and most of these offenses require mandatory exclusion) the provider will be placed on the List of Excluded Individuals and Entities (LEIE) maintained by the HHS OIG.

a. If this happens, you are prohibited by law from working in any position in any capacity for any individual or business, including hospitals, nursing homes, home health agencies, physicians, medical groups, insurance companies, etc., that contract with or bill Medicare or Medicaid. This means, for example, you are prohibited from working as a janitor in a nursing home that accepts Medicare or Medicaid, even as an independent contractor.

b. If this happens, you are also automatically “debarred” or prohibited from participating in any capacity in any federal contracting, and you are placed on the U.S. General Services Administration’s (GSA) debarment list. This means you are prohibited by law from working in any capacity for any government contractor or anyone who takes government funding. This applies, for example, to prevent you from being a real estate agent involved in selling property financed by a government backed loan, prohibited from working for an electrical company that bids on contracts for government housing projects, working as a school teacher in a public school, etc.

c. If this happens, your state Medicaid Program is required to terminate you “for cause” from the state Medicaid Program. In many states, this is also grounds for revocation of your pharmacist license.

5. Any profile or reporting system maintained by a national organization or federation will include the adverse action in it, generally available to the public.

6. If you are a pharmacist or other professional with clinical privileges at a hospital, nursing home, HMO or clinic, action will be taken to revoke or suspend the clinical privileges and staff membership if you have such. This may be in a hospital, ambulatory surgical center, skilled nursing facility, staff model HMO or clinic. This will usually be for clinical pharmacists.

7. Third party payors (health insurance companies, HMOs, etc.) will terminate the professional’s contract or panel membership with that organization.

8. The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) will act to revoke the professional’s DEA registration if he or she has one.

9. Many employers will not hire you or will terminate your employment if they discover your license has been disciplined in another state.

What You Should Do.

– Don’t take the easy way out by immediately relinquishing your license if you are notified you are under investigation.

– Don’t hide your head in the sand by thinking the case will just go away on its own.

– Don’t take the easy way out. If you are innocent of the charges, request a formal hearing and contest the charges; defend yourself.

– Do not request an informal hearing or a settlement agreement in which you admit the facts alleged against you are all true. If you do this, you are “pleading guilty.”

– Do immediately seek the advice of an attorney who has experience in such professional licensing matters and administrative hearings. They are out there, but you may have to search for one. Do this as soon as you get notice of any investigation and especially before you have talked to or made any statement (including a written one) to any investigator.

– Do purchase professional liability insurance that includes legal defense coverage for any professional license investigation against you, whether it is related to a malpractice claim or not. This insurance is cheap and will provide needed legal assistance at the time when you may be out of a job and not have money to hire an attorney. Beware of the insurance policy that only covers professional license defense if it is related to a malpractice claim.

Get Your Own Professional Liability Insurance.

We strongly encourage all licensed health professionals and facilities to purchase their own, independent insurance coverage. Make sure it covers professional license defense under all circumstances. Make sure you have enough coverage to actually get you through a hearing. $25,000 coverage for just professional licensure defense is the absolute minimum you should purchase; $50,000 may be adequate but $75,000 or $100,000 may be what you really need in such a situation. For a few dollars more (and I do mean only a few) you can usually purchase the higher limits.

Also, I will repeat, make sure it covers your legal defense in an administrative disciplinary proceeding against your license, even if there is no malpractice claim filed against you or likely to be filed against you.

We also recommend that you purchase coverage through an insurance company that allows you to select your own attorney and does not make you use one that the insurance company picks for you.

Companies we have encountered in the past who provide an inexpensive top quality insurance product for professional license defense costs include: CPH & Associates Insurance, Healthcare Providers Organization (HPSO) Insurance and Lloyd’s of London Insurance.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Pharmacies and Pharmacists.

The Health Law Firm represents pharmacists and pharmacies in DEA investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, administrative hearings, inspections and audits. The firm’s attorneys include those who are board certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law as well as licensed health professionals who are also attorneys.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

 

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

New Permit Law for Florida Pharmacies that Compound Sterile Products

LOL Blog Label 2Lance O. Leider, J.D., The Health Law Firm and George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

The Florida Board of Pharmacy announced a new law which will be required for pharmacies that compound sterile products. Effective September 23, 2013, Rule 64B16-28.100(8), Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.), requires most pharmacies that engage in the preparation of sterile compounded products in Florida to obtain a Special Sterile Compounding Permit. Pharmacies compounding sterile products under their current pharmacy permit may continue to do so, but must obtain the new Special Sterile Compounding Permit on or before March 21, 2014.

Click here to read the notice from the Florida Board of Pharmacy.

We believe the updated requirements are a result of the recent recalls of tainted compounded medications that have spread across the country and infected thousands of patients. These new standards will make it easier for authorities to quickly spot where tainted batches of medications were produced.

Special Sterile Compounding Permit Exceptions.

All permitees that are currently compounding sterile products are required to submit an application to obtain the Special Sterile Compounding Permit.

However, the exceptions are for stand-alone Special Parenteral/Enteral pharmacies, Special Parenteral/Enteral Extended Scope pharmacies, pharmacies that only perform non-sterile compounding, and non-resident pharmacies.

How to Apply for the Special Sterile Compounding Permit.

To obtain the new Special Sterile Compounding Permit, an applicant must already hold another pharmacy permit and must submit an application for the new permit. Those applying for this permit will be required to submit information from current policies and procedures which will be reviewed before an inspection is requested from the Florida Board of Pharmacy.

The application is available by clicking here.

Once approved, the Florida Board of Pharmacy will issue a new Special Sterile Compounding Permit. This means pharmacies that compound sterile products will have two pharmacy permits.

New Standards Most Likely Triggered by Tainted Compounded Medications.

These new standards are being implemented about a year after a nationwide outbreak of fungal meningitis linked to contaminated drugs made by a compounding pharmacy in Massachusetts. Click here to read our previous blog. Florida is no stranger to allegations of tainted compounded products. In May 2013, Franck’s pharmacy in Ocala, Florida, was accused of distributing eye medications that contained a fungal infection. Click here for the first blog and here for the second blog on this.

It’s likely this new permit is a direct result of the recent issues with compounded medications and compounding pharmacies. The aim of the permit is to help authorities, such as the Department of Health (DOH) and U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), track Florida pharmacies compounding sterile products.

New Requirements Released for Physician Medical Records Related to Compounded Medications.

Similarly, on September 5, 2013, the Florida Board of Medicine and the Florida Board of Osteopathic Medicine published new requirements for medical record documentation related to compounded medications administered to patients in an office setting.  These standards became effective on September 9, 2013. The standards are contained in Florida Administrative Code Rules adopted by each board. Click here to read our previous blog on this.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Pharmacies and Pharmacists.

The Health Law Firm represents pharmacists and pharmacies in DEA, DOH and FDA investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, administrative hearings, inspections and audits. The firm’s attorneys include those who are board certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law as well as licensed health professionals who are also attorneys.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

Had you heard of this new permit? How will this affect pharmacies compounding sterile products? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

About the Authors: Lance O. Leider is an attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the OrlandSeptember 18, 2013o, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Avenue, Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Drug Quality and Security Act Boosts FDA Regulations Over Compounding Pharmacies

Lance Leider headshotBy Lance O. Leider, J.D., The Health Law Firm

On November 18, 2013, the United States Senate voted to increase federal oversight of compounding pharmacies that produce large volumes of mixed drugs. This bill comes in the wake of last year’s meningitis outbreak stemming from unsanitary conditions at the New England Compounding Center (NECC). Click here to read a previous blog on the meningitis outbreak.

This bill does not give the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) absolute authority over compounders, but creates significant safeguards.

This particular piece of legislation passed the House of Representatives in September of 2013, passed in the Senate in November 2013, and President Obama signed it into law on November 28, 2013. To read a summary of the Drug Quality and Security Act, click here.

Under Law, Registration with the FDA is Voluntary.

The goal of the Drug Quality and Security Act is to enact greater controls, tracking, and oversight of the compounding pharmacy industry. Presently, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) only regulates manufacturers of medications, leaving compounding pharmacies to be regulated by state boards of pharmacy.

However, this two-part regulation left large compounding operations like the NECC in somewhat of a gray area. Large compounding labs like NECC that mass produce products to ship across state lines have come under fire from state boards of pharmacy.

At a recent meeting of the Florida Board of Pharmacy’s Compounding Committee, the panel members expressed concerns over the lack of inspections and oversight of pharmacies shipping drugs into Florida. In general, the Committee supported the efforts to strengthen regulations, whether by the FDA or state boards.

Overview of the Law.

Under the final legislation, compounders that mix sterile drugs without a prescription and ship across state lines can choose to register as outsourcing facilities. The pharmacies that register would then be regulated by the FDA rather than by state boards of pharmacy. The hope is that compounding pharmacists will want to register with the FDA because physicians will prefer using compounding pharmacies that are federally regulated, and therefore considered safer.

The law also creates a national system for tracking prescription drugs from the manufacturer to retail pharmacies, first this is done through serial numbers on bottles and later through electronic codes. Drug makers will be required to add serial numbers to all drug packages within four years, and within 10 years drug makers must implement electronic codes that can be used to track medicine from the factory to the pharmacy.

Issues with Previous Inspections.

As mentioned above, the issue of large-scale compounding and nonresident pharmacies was recently discussed by the Florida Board of Pharmacy.

Florida has more than 700 nonresident pharmacy permits outstanding. According to the Board of Pharmacy, approximately half of those are shipping compounded sterile products into Florida.

Prior to the events at NECC, state boards of pharmacy were under the mistaken assumption that their sister boards were appropriately regulating and inspecting these pharmacies. However, it turns out that many of the inspections were conducted by inadequately trained staff, or the staff was misled as to exactly what was going on at the pharmacy.

Many of the pharmacies wrongly informed the state inspectors that they were registered with the FDA as a manufacturer and did not have to provide prescriptions during inspections. This led to largely unregulated production of compounded sterile medications and eventually the meningitis outbreak of 2012.

Florida Board of Pharmacy to Have More Oversight.

Frustrated with the general lack of oversight and the potential harm to Floridians, the Board is preparing to take additional steps to ensure that compounders are appropriately regulated.

Among the possible steps to be taken are:

1. Outsourcing nonresident pharmacy inspections to organizations like the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy (NABP);

2. Require personal inspection by a Florida Board-approved inspector prior to issuing or renewing a license (costs of the inspection would be paid by the permittee);

3. Training specialized compounding pharmacy inspectors; and

4. Creating a Verified Pharmacy Program in conjunction with the NABP and other state boards.

Ultimately, the result of the additional regulations will mean more rigorous compliance standards on both in and out-of-state compounding pharmacies.

New Permit Law for Florida Pharmacies that Compound Sterile Products.

The Florida Board of Pharmacy also recently announced a new law which will be required for pharmacies that compound sterile products. Effective September 23, 2013, Rule 64B16-28.100(8), Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.), requires most pharmacies that engage in the preparation of sterile compounded products in Florida to obtain a Special Sterile Compounding Permit. Pharmacies compounding sterile products under their current pharmacy permit may continue to do so, but must obtain the new Special Sterile Compounding Permit on or before March 21, 2014. To read more, click here.

These new standards will make it easier for authorities to quickly spot where tainted batches of medications were produced. It is important to regularly review the Board of Pharmacy rules and USP guidelines to ensure your facility is compliant.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced with Investigations of Pharmacies and Pharmacists.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm provide legal representation to pharmacies, pharmacists and other health providers in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) investigations, FBI investigations, Medicare investigations, Medicaid investigations and other types of investigations of health professionals and providers.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

Have you heard of these new possible pharmacy regulations? How will this affect you or your pharmacy? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Lee, Jaimy. “Bill Boosting FDA Authority Over Compounding Pharmacies Heads to Obama.” Modern Healthcare. (November 18, 2013). From: http://www.modernhealthcare.com/article/20131118/NEWS/311189973/bill-boosting-fda-authority-over-compounding-pharmacies-heads-to?utm_source=frontpage&utm_medium=newsitem309&utm_campaign=carousel-traffic

Perrone, Matthew. “Pharmacy Bill Set for Test Vote in Senate.” Washington Post. (November 11, 2013). From: http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/pharmacy-bill-set-for-test-vote-in-senate/2013/11/11/a961c958-4b25-11e3-9890-a1e0997fb0c0_story.html

About the Author: Lance O. Leider is an attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Avenue, Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Compounding Pharmacies Urged to Sign Up for U.S. Food and Drug Administration Oversight

Lance Leider headshotBy Lance O. Leider, J.D., The Health Law Firm

It is estimated there are 3,000 compounding pharmacies in the United States, 14 of which have signed up to be regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) under the Drug Quality and Security Act. On January 8, 2014, the commissioner of the FDA sent thousands of letters to hospitals and other medical providers that may buy medicines from the compounding pharmacies. The letters urged providers to encourage compounding pharmacies to register as producers of sterile drugs in an effort to protect the public. The letters also mentioned last year’s meningitis outbreak stemming from unsanitary conditions at the New England Compounding Center (NECC). To read a previous blog on the meningitis outbreak, click here.

In November 2013, the Drug Quality and Security Act was passed. Under the law, the FDA does not have absolute authority over compounders, but it creates significant safeguards. To read a previous blog on the Drug Quality and Security Act, click here.

Registering with the FDA is Voluntary.

The goal of the Drug Quality and Security Act is to enact greater controls, tracking, and oversight of the compounding pharmacy industry. Previously, the FDA only regulated manufacturers of medications, leaving compounding pharmacies to be regulated by state boards of pharmacy. However, this two-part regulation left large compounding operations like the NECC in somewhat of a gray area. Large compounding labs mass producing products and shipping across state lines have recently come under fire from state boards of pharmacy.

Overview of the Drug Quality and Security Act.

Under the final legislation, compounders that mix sterile drugs without a prescription and ship across state lines can choose to register as outsourcing facilities. The pharmacies that register are regulated by the FDA rather than by state boards of pharmacy. The hope was that compounding pharmacies will register with the FDA because physicians will prefer using facilities that are federally regulated, and therefore considered safer.

The law also creates a national system for tracking prescription drugs from the manufacturer to retail pharmacies, first this is done through serial numbers on bottles and later through electronic codes. Drug makers will be required to add serial numbers to all drug packages within four years, and within 10 years drug makers must implement electronic codes that can be used to track medicine from the factory to the pharmacy. To read a summary of the Drug Quality and Security Act, click here.

What Registered Compounding Pharmacies Must Agree To.

Compounding pharmacies registering with the FDA must agree to routine inspections, and to report adverse events associated with their products. Registered compounding pharmacies must also pay a fee for the privilege. The FDA is listing on its website the companies that have already registered. Click here to see the list.

Ultimately, the result of voluntary federal oversight will mean more rigorous compliance standards for both in and out-of-state compounding pharmacies. However, the purported benefits (more business and a better reputation) may far outweigh the burden.

If your pharmacy is considering FDA registration it would be best to consult with an experienced health attorney to guide you through the process.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced with Investigations of Pharmacies and Pharmacists.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm provide legal representation to pharmacies, pharmacists and other health providers in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) investigations, FBI investigations, Medicare investigations, Medicaid investigations and other types of investigations of health professionals and providers.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

What do you think about the number of compounding pharmacies that have signed up to be regulated by the FDA? As a provider, would you consider using compounding pharmacies that have not signed up? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Palmer, Eric. “Compounders Start to Sign Up for FDA Oversight.” FiercePharma. (January 10, 2014). From: http://www.fiercepharma.com/story/compounders-start-sign-fda-oversight/2014-01-10

Associated Press. “States Urged to Register Compounding Pharmacies.” ABC News. (January 10, 2014). From: http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/states-urged-register-compounding-pharmacies-21489538

Burton, Thomas. “FDA Urges Compounding Pharmacies to Register.” Wall Street Journa. (January 10, 2014). From: http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303754404579312680341438784

About the Author: Lance O. Leider is an attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Avenue, Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Florida Board of Pharmacy Updates Record Retention Rules for Pharmacies

Lance Leider headshotBy Lance O. Leider, J.D., The Health Law Firm

At its meeting held on February 12, 2014, the Florida Board of Pharmacy voted to approve language changes to a number of rules. Specifically, those changes were put into effect to establish a uniform four-year retention policy for pharmacy records.

Previously the Board’s rules were not consistent with respect to how long pharmacies were required to retain different types of records.

When approving new rules or changes to existing rules, administrative bodies are required to evaluate the regulatory costs of the changes. In examining these costs the Board found that any financial costs imposed upon small businesses would be balanced by the efficiencies created by a uniform retention period.

Board of Pharmacy Voted to Change the Wording in These Rules.

Below is a list of the administrative rules that were changed:

– Standards for the Approval of Registered Pharmacy Technician Training Programs
Rule 64B16-26.351, Florida Administrative Code

– Standards for Approval of Courses and Providers
Rule 64B16-26.601, Florida Administrative Code

– Continuing Education Records Requirements
Rule 64B16-26.603, Florida Administrative Code

– General Terms and Conditions to be Followed by a Pharmacist When Ordering and Dispensing Approved Medicinal Drug Products
Rule 64B16-27.210, Florida Administrative Code

– Standards of Practice – Continuous Quality Improvement Program
Rule 64B16-27.300, Florida Administrative Code

– Requirement for Patient Records
Rule 64B16-27.800, Florida Administrative Code

– Change of Ownership
Rule 64B16-28.2021, Florida Administrative Code

– Centralized Prescription Filling, Delivering and Returning
Rule 64B16-28.450, Florida Administrative Code

– Transmission of Starter Dose Prescriptions for Patients in Class I Institutional or Modified II B Facilities
Rule 64B16-28.503, Florida Administrative Code

– Class II Institutional Pharmacies
Rule 64B16-28.605, Florida Administrative Code

– Remote Medication Order Processing for Class II Institutional Pharmacies
Rule 64B16-28.606, Florida Administrative Code

– Automated Pharmacy System – Long-Term Care, hospice, and Prison
Rule 64B16-28.607, Florida Administrative Code

– Modified Class II Institutional Pharmacies
Rule 64B16-28.702, Florida Administrative Code

– Record Maintenance for Animal Shelter Permits
Rule 64B16-29.0041, Florida Administrative Code

Make Sure Your Facility is Prepared.

While these rule changes are not final, it is important to recognize if they will be affecting your facility. You should also be making arrangements in your facility to ensure that there is enough computer disk space or physical space to retain these records. Keep in mind that these records retention rules are in addition to any others imposed by other Florida or federal statutes or rules relating to controlled substances or other pharmacy practices.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Pharmacies and Pharmacists.

The Health Law Firm represents pharmacists and pharmacies in DEA investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, administrative hearings, inspections and audits. The firm’s attorneys include those who are board certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law as well as licensed health professionals who are also attorneys.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

How do you feel about the requirement of pharmacy records to be retained for four years? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

About the Author: Lance O. Leider is an attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Avenue, Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.

Copyright © 1996-2014 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Out-of-State Compounding Pharmacies May Need a Permit To Do Business in Florida

Lance Leider headshotBy Lance O. Leider, J.D., The Health Law Firm

Beginning on October 1, 2014, out-of-state compounding pharmacies may be required to hold a compounded sterile product permit. That’s because the Regulated Industries Committee of the Florida Senate voted on March 13, 2014, to approve a bill increasing the restrictions on out-of-state compounding pharmacies that ship medications into Florida. These increased regulations would apply to around 300 compounding pharmacies shipping medicine to Florida.

The bill was introduced to increase standards for compounding pharmacies that create medications that are tailored to the needs of individual patients. Currently the bill is out for reference review. Considering that this is a hot issue in Florida and nationally, we expect the bill to pass.

Click here to read the entire bill.

Requirements Under the New Bill.

The bill requires out-of-state compounding pharmacies to hold a compounded sterile product permit to ship medications into Florida. Applications for the permit would be provided by the Board of Pharmacy. The bill also requires pharmacies to meet or exceed Florida’s sterile compounding standards. Under the bill, the Florida Department of Health (DOH) is responsible for inspecting out-of-state compounding pharmacies for compliance. The DOH would hold the authority to punish or revoke an out-of-state compounding pharmacy’s license for noncompliance. The pharmacy would be responsible for reimbursing the cost of the inspection.

If the bill passes, compounding pharmacies already shipping compounded sterile products into Florida may continue to do so, as long as the pharmacy receives a permit before January 31, 2015.

Permit Law for Florida Pharmacies that Compound Sterile Products.

Similarly, the Florida Board of Pharmacy promulgated a rule requiring a permit for pharmacies that compound sterile products in Florida. Effective September 23, 2013, Rule 64B16-28.100(8), Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.), requires most pharmacies that engage in the preparation of sterile compounded products in Florida to obtain a Special Sterile Compounding Permit.

Click here to read more on this permit.

New Standards Most Likely Triggered by Tainted Compounded Medications.

These new standards are being implemented after a nationwide outbreak of fungal meningitis linked to contaminated drugs made by a compounding pharmacy in Massachusetts. Florida is no stranger to allegations of tainted compounded products. In May 2012, Franck’s pharmacy in Ocala, Florida, was accused of distributing eye medications that contained a fungal infection. Click here for the first blog and here for the second blog.

It’s likely these new permits are a direct result of the recent issues with compounded medications and compounding pharmacies. The goal of these permits is to help authorities, such as the DOH and U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), track pharmacies compounding sterile products.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Pharmacies and Pharmacists.

The Health Law Firm represents pharmacists and pharmacies in DEA, DOH and FDA investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, administrative hearings, inspections and audits. The firm’s attorneys include those who are board certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law as well as licensed health professionals who are also attorneys.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

What do you think of the bill to increase restrictions on out-of-state compounding pharmacies that ship medications into Florida? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

The News Service of Florida. “Pharmacy Bill, FL Budge Taking Shape.” WUSF News. (March 14, 2014). From: http://wusfnews.wusf.usf.edu/post/pharmacy-bill-fl-budget-taking-shape

Palombo, Jessica. “After Federal Compounding Pharmacy Crackdown, Fla. Panel Passes Extra Restrictions.” WFSU News. (February 12, 2014). From: http://news.wfsu.org/post/after-federal-compounding-pharmacy-crackdown-fla-panel-passes-extra-restrictions

About the Author: Lance O. Leider is an attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

 

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2014 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Florida Legislature Reforms Pharmacy Benefit Manager Audit Practices

1 Indest-2008-1According to the Florida Legislature, it’s time for pharmacists to focus on their patients instead of paperwork. On June 13, 2014, Florida Governor Rick Scott signed Florida Senate Bill 702 into law. This law introduces clear guidelines of acceptable audit practices of pharmacies in the Sunshine State.

There are more than 2,700 pharmacies across Florida that are routinely evaluated by Pharmacy Benefit Managers (PBMs). The purpose of these audits is to verify that certain claims are submitted and handled properly. If a PBM audit uncovers fraud or abuse, the pharmacy will be subject to penalties, including reimbursement of amounts paid. With the increase of rules regulating pharmacies, these audits have progressively become more time consuming for pharmacists.

Florida SB 702 becomes effective on October 1, 2014. To read a summary of the law, click here.

What’s the Need of the New Law?

In the United States, a PBM is most often a third party administrator of prescription drug programs. The PBM is primarily responsible for processing and paying prescription drug claims.
Currently, PBMs have broad discretion to penalize pharmacies. This means that pharmacies can be forced to pay thousands of dollars as the result of basic clerical or typographical mistakes, many of which are not the fault of the pharmacist or pharmacy staff. This law was enacted to provide reasonable standards for pharmacy audits while allowing PBMs to continue penalizing for true fraud and abuse.

Pharmacy Rights Included in New Law.

SB 702 makes common-sense auditing standards that include:

–    At least seven days advance notice before an on-site audit is conducted;
–    On-site audits scheduled after the first three days of the month;
–    A limit on the audit period of 24 months after the date claim is submitted;
–    Audits requiring clinical judgment must be conducted by or with a pharmacist;
–    Use of written practitioner records to validate pharmacy records in accordance with state and federal law;
–    Reimbursement of claims retroactively denied for clerical, typographical or computer errors unless pharmacy has a pattern of fraudulent billing;
–    Delivery of initial audit reports to pharmacists within 120 days after an audit is completed;
–    Receipt of final audit report within six months of the preliminary report;
–    Allowing 10 days for pharmacists to provide documentation to address any discrepancies found during an audit;
–    Prohibiting the use of extrapolations in auditing claims; and
–    The Office of Insurance Regulation will study pharmacy complaints of willful violations of audit provisions by PBMs.

Stipulation of Rights.

The rights listed above do not apply to audits that are based on suspicions of fraud or willful misrepresentation; audits of claims paid for by federally funded programs; or concurrent reviews or desk audits that occur within three business days after transmission where no chargeback or recoupment is demanded.

An entity that audits a pharmacy located within a Health Care Fraud Prevention and Enforcement Action Team Task Force area designated by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) is not required to provide seven days prior notice of an audit if the pharmacy has been a member of a credentialed provider network for less than 12 months.

What This Means for You.

For once there is a new law that does not make a pharmacist’s job more complicated. This law may actually alleviate some of the stress that comes with dealing with an audit. We’re hoping with the implementation of this law pharmacists will be able to spend more time focusing on patient care.

Comments?

What do you think of this new law? Will it affect your pharmacy? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Pharmacies and Pharmacists.

The Health Law Firm represents pharmacists and pharmacies in DEA, DOH and FDA investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, administrative hearings, inspections and audits. The firm’s attorneys include those who are board certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law as well as licensed health professionals who are also attorneys.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

 

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Florida Toughens Up Drug Compounding Law for Out-of-State Pharmacies

8 Indest-2008-5By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

A new, stricter law on Florida’s compounding pharmacy industry took effect October 1, 2014.
The new law increases the restrictions for out-of-state compounding pharmacies and outsourcing facilities that ship medications into Florida. The law also gives the Florida Board of Pharmacy and Florida Department of Health (DOH) more power to oversee and penalize these companies. Click here to read the new law.

The law was enacted to increase the standards for compounding pharmacies that create medications that are supposed to be tailored to the needs of individual patients. In an effort to prevent another nationwide outbreak of fungal meningitis, similar efforts to tighten control on compounding pharmacies have been implemented by other states across the country. Click here to read a prior blog on the fungal meningitis outbreak.

The Lowdown on the New Law.

The bill requires an out-of-state compounding pharmacy or an outsourcing facility to obtain a nonresident sterile compounding permit before shipping products into Florida. Any currently-registered nonresident pharmacies must be permitted by February 28, 2015. However, all compounded sterile products shipped, mailed, delivered, or dispensed into the Sunshine State must meet Florida’s standards for sterile compounding.

The law establishes application and inspection requirements for the nonresident sterile compounding permit, as well as increased responsibilities for the Florida DOH and the Board of Pharmacy.

Under the law, the Florida DOH and Board of Pharmacy are given enhanced oversight for these out-of-state compounding pharmacies, including the authority to inspect a pharmacy or sterile compounding permittee; the cost of which is picked up by the pharmacy or permittee. The Board is authorized to discipline a nonresident pharmacy for conduct which causes or could cause serious injury, without waiting 180 days for the resident state to act. The Board is also authorized to discipline nonresident pharmacies and sterile compounding permittees for specified acts of noncompliance.

New Standards Triggered by Tainted Compounded Medications.

These new standards are being implemented two years after a nationwide outbreak of fungal meningitis linked to contaminated drugs made by a compounding pharmacy in Massachusetts. Florida is no stranger to allegations of tainted compounded products. In May 2012, Franck’s pharmacy in Ocala, Florida, was accused of distributing eye medications that contained a fungal infection. To read more: click here for the first blog and here for the second blog.

It’s likely these new permits are a direct result of the recent issues with compounded medications and compounding pharmacies. The goal of these permits is to help authorities, such as the DOH and the Board of Pharmacy, track pharmacies compounding sterile products.

Comments?

What do you think of the law to increase restrictions on out-of-state compounding pharmacies that ship medications into Florida? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Pharmacies and Pharmacists.

The Health Law Firm represents pharmacists and pharmacies in DEA, DOH and FDA investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, administrative hearings, inspections and audits. The firm’s attorneys include those who are board certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law as well as licensed health professionals who are also attorneys.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources:

Shedden, Mary. “Tougher Compounding Rules Finally Law.” Health News Florida. (September 30, 2014). From: http://bit.ly/1xBQtS0

Florida House Bill 7077

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

 

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2014 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Selling Tobacco Can Get You Penalized By Insurance Panels

Lance Leider headshotBy Lance O. Leider, J.D., The Health Law Firm

Beware: selling cigarettes could burn a hole in your pocket.

The CVS Health Corporation (CVS), the nation’s second-largest drug store, is currently in the midst of launching a tobacco-free prescription-drug network. The company announced in October 2014, that it will begin offering a tobacco-free pharmacy plan to employers, unions, and insurance companies for which its Caremark arm manages prescription benefits. CVS is slapping patients with an extra co-payment “penalty” if they purchase their medications from pharmacies that sell tobacco products, regardless of whether the patient is a tobacco user.

According to US News, by adding a variable co-payment of up to $15, CVS hopes that this new strategy, comparable to a narrow network insurance design, will perpetuate the company’s health-and-wellness based initiatives.

The new network will start in 2015. Customers will receive a list of participating pharmacies before any network change will take place.

Click here to read more from US News.

The Tobacco-Free Retail Trend.

Target and CVS have become the poster children for tobacco-free retailers. In 1996, Target spearheaded the fight against tobacco by eliminating all sales of the toxic substance. In September 2014, the CVS Corporation followed suit and completed its tobacco-free overhaul by removing all tobacco products from store shelves across the nation.

The tobacco-free pharmacy networks would include CVS and Target nationally, as well as local or regional pharmacies such as independent pharmacies that abstain from tobacco sales. Walgreens and Walmart pharmacies, two large-scale rival drug chains that sell tobacco, as well as any other grocery or community pharmacy, should expect patient penalties and negative impacts on prescription-drug revenue.

Those Participating in the Tobacco-Free Network.

According to Yahoo! Finance, CVS representatives said the network was created in a response to pharmacy benefit management (PBM) clients that indicated interest in tobacco-free pharmacies. The tobacco-free network will only be used by the PBM customers that voluntarily participate.

The first employer to sign on is the city of Philadelphia, as it promotes a tobacco-free workforce. Philadelphia officials estimate that between 150 and 200 CVS pharmacies will participate in the Philadelphia network.

To read more on this topic from Yahoo! Finance, click here.

Sincere Motives or a Monopoly in the Making?

There are a myriad of arguments regarding CVS’ genuine motive behind the tobacco-free network. Health benefit analysts argue that the network is a disguised anti-competition scheme. With the announcement of the new network plan, CVS opens itself up to criticism for appearing to steer patients to CVS pharmacies, or strong arm the competition into giving up lucrative tobacco revenue. Although the corporation denies these claims of ulterior motives, Dave Balto, a former policy director at the U.S. Federal Trade Commission argued that “…It’s really another effort to limit the ability of their rivals to effectively compete.”

Independent pharmacies are also questioning the industry benefits of such a plan. Small, local pharmacies that have not carried tobacco products for years may be overlooked by the consumers knowingly aware of CVS as a tobacco-free drug store. These mom-and-pop pharmacies will be forced to spend a pretty penny on increased marketing to stand on their own two feet against these mass retail chains.

The Narrow Network Comparison.

Many critics argue that the new CVS plan could be considered a narrow network strategy. A narrow network applies to any health insurance plan that places constraints on doctors and hospitals that are available to their beneficiaries. Typically plans will not cover medical services received out-of-network or they will increase co-payments.

These designs are becoming more common for insurance companies and pharmacy benefit managers. By limiting the choices, insurers say they can better focus on the quality of medical care that is delivered to plan customers.

Comments?

What is your opinion of the new CVS tobacco-free network plan? Do you think it will be beneficial for overall community health or more detrimental to the livelihood of small pharmacies? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Pharmacies and Pharmacists.

The Health Law Firm represents pharmacists and pharmacies in DEA, DOH and FDA investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, administrative hearings, inspections and audits. The firm’s attorneys include those who are board certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law as well as licensed health professionals who are also attorneys.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at http://www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources:

Silverman, Ed and Ziobro, Paul. “CVS Plays Hardball with Rival Drug Chains.” (October 20, 2014). From: http://finance.yahoo.com/news/cvs-plays-hardball-rival-drug-231400764.html

Murphy, Tom. “CVS Health Stretches Anti-tobacco Push to New Prescription Drug Network.” (October 21, 2014). From: http://www.usnews.com/news/business/articles/2014/10/21/cvs-develops-tobacco-free-prescription-network

About the Author: Lance O. Leider is an attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2014 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Florida Compounding Pharmacy Pays $3.7 Million in Tricare False Claims Settlement

2 Indest-2009-1By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

In May of 2015, Tricare began screening all compound medication prescriptions to ensure approval of each ingredient with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This decision came after a finding of a significant increase in compound drug prescriptions reimbursed by Tricare over the last year.

In April 2015, just four months into the fiscal year, it was already determined that total costs for compound drug prescriptions filled for Tricare recipients were likely to come close to $1 billion. If the trend continues, the Defense Health Agency expects it may need to reallocate funds at the end of this year to cover the prescription drug benefit, which is currently set at $8.25 billion.

For more on this new screening process and its effect on compound medication prescriptions, click here.

With prescription drug costs at an all-time high, the government is cracking down on health care fraud. This includes the implementation of data mining for fraud detection and prevention.

It was during one of these routine mining expeditions of reimbursement data that the United States Attorney’s Office identified MediMix, a compounding pharmacy in Jacksonville, Florida, as the top-biller of compounding pain prescriptions. More importantly, upon further investigation, it was found that Ankit Desai, M.D. was the top referring physician for MediMix.

The significance in the correlation between the two is that, according to reports, Dr. Desai happens to be married to one of the top executives (Senior Vice President) of Medimix.

To read the press release on this story, click here.

Anti-Fraud Laws Prohibit Certain Physician Referrals.

Health care providers are generally prohibited from referring patients to another medical-related business in which they hold a financial interest of some kind, if there are payments made with federal funds.

The prohibition on certain physician referrals is established under Section 1395nn, 42 United States Code (otherwise known as the Stark Law). The Stark Law was specifically enacted to place limitations on physician referrals so as to avoid:

(1) conflicts of interests;

(2) self-referrals;

(3) overutilization of services;

(4) increased health care costs;

(5) a limit on competition by other medical providers;

(6) to prevent ineffective and unsafe treatment; and, ultimately-

(7) fraudulent practices.

Click here for more information on the most common Federal fraud and abuse laws in health care.

The Stakes are High for Non-Compliance.

MediMix reached a settlement agreement with the government which has avoided a determination of liability. However, the Jacksonville-based compounding pharmacy did not get off without a significant penalty. The settlement will cost MediMix an impressive $3,775,458.

Click here to read more about the government cracking down on what they determine to be “a significant threat to the [Department of Defense] DoD healthcare system.”

The FCA has been highly effective in exposing fraudulent practices of pharmaceutical companies. Whistleblower cases brought under the FCA have assisted the government in recovering more than $19 billion in stolen funds due to varying pricing, billing and marketing schemes.

To read more about the importance of complying with Stark and other anti-fraud laws, read one of our previous blogs here.

Avoiding False Claims Violations.

Here are the most common pharmaceutical practices that can result in allegations of FCA violations:

(1) Off-label marketing of drugs;

(2) Illegal kickbacks;

(3) Inflating the price of pharmaceuticals;

(4) Best price fraud; and

(5) Pharmaceutical benefits manager fraud.

If you find yourself in a tricky situation with possible allegations of a FCA violation, it’s best to contact an experienced health attorney immediately to properly evaluate your case and inform you of your rights.

For more about your right to consult with a lawyer prior to speaking with an investigator, please read one of our previous blogs here.

Comments?
Are you currently engaged in a questionable financial relationship? Do you agree with the law on prohibiting certain referrals in which there is a financial interest? Why or why not? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Pharmacies and Pharmacists.

The Health Law Firm represents pharmacists and pharmacies in DEA, DOH and FDA investigations, qui tam and whistleblower cases, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, administrative hearings, inspections and audits. The firm’s attorneys include those who are board certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law as well as licensed health professionals who are also attorneys.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources:

Department of Justice, The United States Attorney’s Office, Middle District of Florida. Press release. “United States Settles False Claims Act Allegations Against Jacksonville-Based Compounding Pharmacy.” 1 June 2015. Web. 11 Sept. 2015.

Kime, Patricia. “Tricare to Start Screening Compound Medications Friday.” Military Times. A TEGNA Co., 1 May 2015. Web. 10 Sept. 2015.

“Pharmaceutical Fraud” Web blog post. False Claims Act Resource Center. Pietragallo Gordon Alfano Bosick & Raspanti, LLP, 2015. Web. 11 Sept. 2015.

Rumph, Alan, and Donna Lee Yesner. “When Referrals And Marriage Don’T Mix: MD, Pharmacy Settle Case.” Report on Medicare Compliance. Washington: Atlantic Information Services, Inc., 8 June 2015. Web. 11 Sept. 2015.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

Keywords: False Claims Act defense attorney, FCA, pharmaceutical fraud, compounding pharmacy attorney, fraudulent practices of pharmaceutical companies, whistleblowers lawyer, FCA violations, fraud detection, data mining, financial interest in physician referrals, Stark Law, Department of Defense, DoD, Tricare fraud attorney, health attorney, defense attorney, The Health Law Firm, health law firm, fraud investigations, conflict of interest in physician referrals, compound medication prescriptions, compounding pharmacy lawyer, prescription reimbursement, qui tam attorney, financial relationship with physician

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2015 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

By |2024-03-14T10:01:19-04:00May 15, 2018|Categories: Florida Board of Pharmacy, Legal Defense for Pharmacists, Pharmacy Audit, Pharmacy Law|Tags: , |Comments Off on Florida Compounding Pharmacy Pays $3.7 Million in Tricare False Claims Settlement
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