In the Know

Health care law encompasses a wide range of issues. Learn more about regulations, legislation and general information involving health care providers and professionals (physicians, nurses, pharmacists, therapists, mental health counselors, rehab facilities, nursing homes, DME suppliers, medical students and interns, pain management clinics, hospital administrators, etc.) including information regarding the Department of Health, professional boards (Board of Nursing, Board of Pharmacy, Board of Dentistry, Board of Medicine, etc.), DEA, AHCA (Florida Agency for Health Care Administration) and Medicare and Medicaid.

OIG Exclusion: What You Need to Know if You’re on the List

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Have you ever had disciplinary action against your license as a health care professional? Have you ever been arrested or convicted of a criminal offense? Have you ever been convicted of fraud or patient neglect? If so, then you may have also been terminated or excluded from the federal Medicare Program or your state Medicaid Program.

Many health professionals don’t understand the significant repercussions that an exclusion action by the Office of the Inspector General (OIG) can have on their career and employment. Whether you are a physician, nurse, dentist, psychologist or other health professional, if you allow yourself to be excluded from the Medicare Program, devastating economic results may follow.

Check the List.

To check if you are on the federal government’s List of Excluded Individuals and Entities (LEIE), click here.

To see if you are on Florida’s list of individuals and entities who have been terminated from Florida’s Medicaid Program, click here.

Collateral Consequences to OIG Exclusion or Termination.

Termination or exclusion can have many collateral consequences about which most health care providers are not aware. These Include:

– Termination for cause from all state Medicaid Programs.

– Loss of state professional licenses in other states and jurisdictions.

– Loss of hospital, ambulatory surgical center (ASC), and nursing home clinical privileges.

– Removal from the provider panels of health insurers.

– Loss of ability to contract or work for any individual or entity that contracts with the Medicare Program in any capacity (officer agent, shareholder, director, employee or independent contractor, even for non-Medicare products and services such as office supplies, building and construction services, software and systems support, etc.), including physicians, medical groups, hospitals, healthcare systems, ambulatory surgical centers, skilled nursing facilities, health insurance companies, etc.

– Placement on the General Services Administration (GSA) Exclusions List (or “Debarred” List) from government contracting.

– Loss of ability to contract or work for any individual or entity that contracts with the federal government in any capacity (officer agent, shareholder, director, employee or independent contractor, even for such services as construction projects, janitorial contracts, computer equipment and software services, real estate brokers on federally underwritten housing loans, sales of motor vehicles, products and services to the government, etc.

To learn more on the consequences of being excluded, click here.

You’re on the List, Now What?

If you find yourself on a state’s excluded or terminated list or if you find yourself on the federal LEIE, all is not lost. There are ways to become reinstated.

The OIG exclusion list is a complicated regulatory program which requires experience and perseverance to navigate. It is highly recommended that you do not attempt to handle removal without qualified assistance. If your application is denied, even for hyper-technical reasons, you may be barred from reapplying for one full calendar year. Therefore, it is crucial that your application is complete and correct, and you are fully eligible for removal. To read a past blog about reinstatement after OIG removal, click here.

Contact Attorney Experienced in Defending Against Action to Exclude an Individual or Business from the Medicare Program and Assisting in Reinstatement Applications.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm have experience in dealing with the Office of the Inspector General (OIG) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and defending against action to exclude an individual or business entity from the Medicare Program, in administrative hearings on this type of action, in submitting applications requesting reinstatement to the Medicare Program after exclusion, and removal from the List of Excluded Individuals and Entities (LEIE).

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

KeyWords: Exclusion list, Office of Inspector General, OIG, OIG exclusion list, OIG reinstatement representation, representation for physicians, representation for physician reimbursement, licensure defense attorney, professional license representation, licensure defense representation, representation for health care professionals, investigations analyst, applying for reinstatement, Application for Reinstatement, Medicare Exclusion attorney, OIG Hearing, Request for Reinstatement, Removal from List of Excluded Individuals and Entities (LEIE), Application to OIG, Medicare Reinstatement representation, Medicaid Reinstatement representation, healthcare fraud lawyes, Medicare defense attorney, Medicaid defense lawyer, Florida defense attorney, Florida defense lawyer, The Health Law Firm reviews

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of and a registered service mark of The Health Law Firm, P.A., a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 2018 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

By |2018-10-10T17:20:48+00:00October 10th, 2018|In the Know, The Health Law Firm Blog|1 Comment

Nurses Take a Look at This Disciplinary Action Database

By Christopher E. Brown, J.D.

Nurses, did you know the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) maintains a database of all state disciplinary actions?  This database, called Licensure QuickConfirm, lists all disciplinary actions from the Florida Board of Nursing and forty-six (46) other state boards. It is frequently used by hospitals and medical groups to screen potential employees.

To search the Licensure QuickConfirm list, click here.

The Boards of Nursing Supply Information to Database.

According to the website, all information listed on the database comes directly from the boards of nursing. A report will contain:
– the nurse’s name, – licensed jurisdiction,– license type

– license number,

– compact status (single state or multistate),

– license original issue date,

– license expiration date,

– discipline against license, and

– discipline against privilege to practice.

Check your Profile Immediately for Errors.

If you have recently received discipline from the Florida Board of Nursing, or any other state board of nursing, it would be prudent to immediately check this website to verify that any information listed under your profile is accurate.  The website clearly states that it is the nurse’s responsibility to contact the board of nursing to update his or her information.

Our law firm recently encountered errors on this database that our client contended caused him lost employment opportunities.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Nurses.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent nurses in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, in appearances before the Board of Nursing in licensing matters and in many other legal matters. We represent nurses across the U.S., and throughout Florida.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: Christopher E. Brown, J.D., is an attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.

Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Remedies for Violation of HIPAA Privacy Rights and Medical Confidentiality – Part 2

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

I receive many questions and e-mails about possible violations of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act’s (HIPAA) Privacy Regulations and Security Regulations, and breaches of confidentiality of medical records and medical information. 

More detailed information on HIPAA Privacy Regulations and Security Regulations, can be found at: http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/hipaa/understanding/index.html

There is no private cause of action allowed to an individual to sue for a violation of the federal HIPAA or any of its regulations.  This means you do not have a right to sue based on a violation of HIPAA by itself.  However, you may have a right to sue based on state law. 

To read the first part of this blog, click here. To continue learning more on HIPAA Privacy Rights and Medical Confidentiality, see below.

4.  State Laws and Law Suits (Civil Recovery).

If there was a violation or breach of patient confidentiality or medical records confidentiality, this may also be a violation of the state’s laws on patient or medical records confidentiality.  In most states this would give you a legal cause of action for invasion of privacy or for negligence.

The biggest problem usually encountered in this type of case and the reason most attorneys will not even consider taking one is the lack of documented  provable damages (again, I emphasize the words “documented” and “provable”).

5.  The Key is Documented, Provable Damages.

Unless you have actual bills and receipts, you don’t have this.  In most cases, unless you can prove that you have suffered actual damages by proof such as:

a.  Doctors’ bills you have paid

b.  Mental health counseling fees you have paid

c.  The purchase of credit protection insurance

d.  The purchase of identification theft insurance

e.  The costs you have paid because your identity was stolen

f.   Lost pay from time off (with the pay stubs, W-2 forms, etc., to prove the amount)

g.  Lost pay from a lost job (with the pay stubs, W-2 forms, etc., to prove the pay lost)

h.  Attorney’s fees paid as a direct result of the breach of privacy (key word being “direct result”)

i.  Other actual out-of-pocket expenses, you may have a difficult time proving a case in a court of law

If you have these keep good, detailed documentation.  Obtain good, legible receipts for everything.

Unless you have these, you will have great difficulty in finding a plaintiff’s attorney to take such a case.  It is doubtful that you would have a provable case, as well.  There are exceptions to every case, however.

If you do feel that you have a valid case with documented damages, we urge you to contact and retain a plaintiff’s attorney to file suit on your behalf as soon as possible.  You have only a short period of time to bring up such a case, after which your rights to do so will be extinguished forever.

We would urge you to consider carrying out actions #1, #2 and #3 in Part 1.  If these organizations do not find in your favor, then it is even less likely that a judge or jury would find in your favor.

The Difference Between Hourly Attorney vs. Contingency Fee Attorney.

Our statements above hold true mainly because most attorneys who would take such a case are plaintiff’s attorneys who take cases for a contingency fee (a percentage of the amount they win).  In such a case, if an attorney spends 100 hours preparing for trial (actually a low number), wins your case, and you only have $500 worth of provable damages (if the contingency fee agreement is for 40%, a fairly standard amount) then that attorney only gets $200, or $2.00 per hour.  I don’t know any attorney who will work for that amount.  (This is a very simplistic illustration to make the point; it does not even take into account the legal costs involved, which the client is usually responsible for paying.)

An attorney who charges by the hour may be more likely to take the case (but he/she may also be hard to find for this type of case), and may require a retainer fee of $5,000 to $15,000 paid up front just to get started.

If you have a civil case for liability, you only have a short, limited time to file it.  You must do so within the applicable time period or you will lose the right to do so forever.

Remember, there is only a short time in which to take any action that may be necessary and if you fail to do so, your rights may be lost forever.

Again, this is not legal advice, just general information.

Contact a Health Law Attorney Experienced in Defending HIPAA Complaints and Violations.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm represent physicians, medical groups, nursing homes, home health agencies, pharmacies, hospitals and other healthcare providers and institutions in investigating and defending alleged HIPAA complaints and violations and in preparing Corrective Action Plans (CAPs).

For more information about HIPAA violations, electronic health records or corrective action plans (CAPs) please visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com or call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Contracting 101: Tips for Physicians and Health Professionals – Part 5

By Christopher E. Brown, J.D., and George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law
This blog is the fifth in a series intended to provide an introductory review of the basics of contracting for physicians and health professionals, primarily by discussing employment agreements. We will highlight many of the common provisions found in employment contracts, along with many of the mistakes and pitfalls that we see in our day-to-day practice.

By the end of the series it is our hope that physicians and other health professionals will understand the common language and terms found in employment contracts for professionals so they can recognize mistakes commonly made by physicians and health professionals when negotiating them. We hope to help make both employers and employees more knowledgeable about employment contracts so they can avoid potential problem areas and legal entanglements.

Click here for part one of the series, click here for part twohere for part three and here for part four.

Our comments here are meant to provide general rules we have learned from our experience. However, please remember, every situation is different and there are exceptions to every rule.

Tip 11 – Consider Clauses That Allow the Employer to Terminate the Agreement Without Cause on a 30 Day or More Notice.

Many agreements contain a clause allowing one party or both parties to terminate the agreement “without cause” by giving advance notice of so many days.

With such a clause in your contract, you no longer have a one or two-year agreement. Instead, you have a 30 day, 60 day, 90 day or 180 day contract.

Termination without cause provisions can work for you or against you. Regardless, the term of employment is shortened if there is one. Think about whether or not you can find another job and relocate in 30 days.

Tip 12 – Include a “Cure” Provision If There Is a “For Cause” Termination Provision in the Contract.

This a provision which requires the employer to provide you written notice of any deficiency or breach and allows you a certain period of time (usually anywhere from 10 to 30 days) to cure it.

Tip 13 – Be Specific in a Promise to Make You a “Partner” or “Shareholder.”

A promise to make you a “partner” or “shareholder” in the practice after a certain period of time will not be enforceable unless all of the terms are specified in order for a court to enforce it (price, timing, percentage of ownership, method of payment of the buy-in, etc.). Think of an option to purchase a house. Unless all of the terms for a binding contract are set forth in writing and agreed to by the parties, it will not be enforceable.

Also remember that a promise to “consider” you as a “partner” or “shareholder” in a contract is just as worded. You may be considered and denied this important opportunity.

More Blogs on Contracting to Come.

In our future blogs, we will continue to provide tips on various issues to watch for in health care employment contracts.

Contact a Health Care Attorney Experienced in Negotiating and Evaluating Physician and Health Professional’s Business Transactions.

At the Health Law Firm we provide legal services for all health care providers and professionals. This includes physicians, nurses, dentists, psychologists, psychiatrists, mental health counselors, durable medical equipment suppliers (DME), medical students and interns, hospitals, ambulatory surgical centers, pain management clinics, nursing homes, and any other health care provider.

The services we provide include reviewing and negotiating contracts, preparing contracts, helping employers and employees enforce contracts, advice on setting aside or voiding contracts, litigation of contracts (in start or federal court), business transactions, professional license defense, opinion letters, representation in investigations, fair hearing defense, representation in peer review and clinical privileges hearings, litigation of restrictive covenant (covenants not to compete), Medicare and Medicaid audits, commercial litigation, and administrative hearings.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

As a physician, do you have any questions about contracts? Tell us your mistakes or triumphs in negotiating your contract below.

About the Authors: Christopher E. Brown, J.D., is an attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Lehigh University Student Sues Grad School for $1.3 Million for Bad Grade

Patricia's Photos 013By George F. Indest, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

While in school, we all received grades that we believed to be unfair or unwarranted. One graduate of Lehigh University in Pennsylvania, has taken her bad grade to court. She is suing the university over a “C+” grade. In the lawsuit, the student claims that if not for a zero she was given in participation for a fieldwork class in 2009, she would have gotten a “B.” That grade would have allegedly allowed the student to move on toward finishing her master’s in counseling and human services. The student claims the one bad grade prevented her from attaining her dream to become a licensed professional counselor. Now she is suing the university for $1.3 million, according to an article in The Morning Call.

Click here to read the entire article from The Morning Call.

Was the Grade Given for Unprofessional Behavior or in Retaliation of Student’s Activism?

According to an article in The Morning Call, the student claims she received the low grade because the teacher and the then-director of the degree program conspired to hold her back. The student allegedly claims they were unhappy she had complained after being forced to find a supplemental internship partway through the semester. The student also claims the teacher was biased against her (the student’s) activism for gay and lesbian rights.

Attorneys for the university argue the grade was given to the student in an effort to help her address the skills she needed to be a licensed professional counselor. It’s stated in the complaint that the student expressed unprofessional behavior during class, including outbursts of cursing and crying.

The student ended up graduating from Lehigh University with a master’s degree in human development. She now works as a drug and alcohol counselor, according to The Morning Call. The $1.3 million she is seeking represents the alleged difference in her earnings over her career if she was instead a state-certified counselor.

Can a Judge Change a Grade?

The judge in this case questions whether he has the legal authority to actually change a grade received by a student. He has looked at cases nationally and has been unable to find one in which a judge had done so. The student’s attorney believes the judge has a wide enough latitude to impose “equitable remedies,” according to The Morning Call.

From our experience with such matters, the courts are extremely reluctant to become involved in such academic matters. Absent convincing evidence of discrimination, it is doubtful the courts will decide in the student’s favor.

Legal Ramifications of this Case.

According to an article on Huffington Post, there have been a number of students who have sued their alma maters in grading conflicts. For example, two former Texas Southern University law students filed a lawsuit in 2012 against the university’s Thurgood Marshall School of Law because they received “Ds.” The bad grades led to their dismissal for not maintaining 2.0 GPAs and put a stop to their pursuit of becoming attorneys.

Click here to read more stories of students suing their schools.

Contact a Health Care Attorney that is Experienced in the Representation of Medical Students, Interns, Residents and Applicants.

The Health Law Firm and its attorneys represent medical school students in disputes with their medical schools, internship supervisors, and in dismissal hearings. We have represented residents, interns and fellows in various disputes regarding their academic and clinical performance, allegations of substance abuse, failure to complete integral parts training, alleged false or incomplete statements on applications, allegations of impairment (because of abuse or addiction to drugs or alcohol or because of mental or physical issues), because of discrimination due to race, sex, national origin, sexual orientation and on other matters.

To learn more about our experience in the representation of medical students, click here.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

What do you think about this case? Do you think the judiciary should be injecting itself into the academic process? How do you think this lawsuit will end? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Yates, Riley. “Judge decides quickly after request to dismiss Lehigh lawsuit over C+ grade.” The Morning Call. (February 13, 2013). From: http://articles.mcall.com/2013-02-13/news/mc-lehigh-university-student-sues-over-grade-0213-20130213_1_carr-and-nicholas-ladany-zero-in-classroom-participation-daughter-of-lehigh-finance

Kingkade, Tyler. “Megan Thode, Lehigh University Grad, Files $1.3 Million Lawsuit Over C+ Grade.” HuffingtonPost. (February 13, 2013). From: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/02/13/megan-thode-lehigh-university-lawsuit_n_2671739.html?view=print&comm_ref=false

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

CMS Fights Medicare Fraud With Ban on New Home Health Agencies and Ambulance Suppliers in Three Cities

LOL Blog Label 2

By Lance O. Leider, J.D., The Health Law Firm and George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced it will temporarily ban new home health providers and ambulance suppliers from enrolling in Medicare, Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) in three fraud “hot spots.” According to CMS, the six-month moratorium begins July 30, 2013. It applies to newly enrolling home health agencies (HHAs) in Miami, Florida, and Chicago, Illinois. It also applies to newly enrolling ambulance suppliers in Houston, Texas. Existing providers and suppliers can continue to deliver and bill for services. The goal of the ban is to fight healthcare fraud.

Click here to read the press release from CMS.

Authority to impose a moratorium was included in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA). According to a summary of the anti-fraud provisions in the Affordable Care Act, the Act allows CMS to prohibit new providers from joining the program where necessary to prevent or fight fraud, waste or abuse in certain geographic areas or for certain categories of services. This is the first time CMS is exercising its authority.

Why Moratorium Was Imposed in These Areas.

According to CMS, the decision to impose the moratorium was based on a number of factors, including a disproportional number of providers and suppliers relative to beneficiaries, a quick increase in enrollment applications from providers and suppliers, and extremely high utilization in these areas.

Miami Area a Hot Bed for Healthcare Fraud and Abuse.

The Miami area has stood out as one of the nation’s hubs of Medicare fraud, according to CMS. For example, in May 2013, a Miami patient recruiter for an HHA was sentenced to 37 months in prison for participating in a $20 million Medicare fraud scheme. Click here to read a previous blog. In that same month, workers from a Miami-area HHA were accused of bribing Medicare beneficiaries for their Medicare information, which was used to bill for home health services that were never rendered or not medically necessary. To read more, click here.

According to the Miami Herald, with a large number of elderly Medicare beneficiaries living in Miami, it’s not a surprise that healthcare fraud is so prevalent. South Florida allegedly accounts for one-third (1/3) of all healthcare fraud prosecutions in the nation. Click here to read the entire Miami Herald article.

The Affordable Care Act Offers the Government New Tools to Fight Healthcare Fraud.

In 2011 and 2012, the government reported recovery of $14.9 billion in healthcare fraud judgments, settlements and administrative impositions, according to CMS. In addition, CMS has revoked 14,663 providers and suppliers’ ability to bill the Medicare Program since 2011. The Affordable Care Act seeks to improve anti-fraud and abuse measures by focusing on prevention rather than the traditional “pay-and-chase” model of catching crooks after they have committed fraud. Click here to read a blog on the Affordable Care Act’s other fraud fighting tools.

What This Means for Health Care Professionals and Providers.

By knowing the government is beefing up measures to fight healthcare fraud, providers can attempt to avoid practices that are likely to lead to Zone Program Integrity Contractor (ZPIC) or Recovery Audit Contractor (RAC) audits. Additionally, a provider can be prepared for potential audits by increasing its documentation and compliance efforts.

Don’t Wait Until It’s Too Late; Consult with a Health Law Attorney Experienced in Medicare and Medicaid Issues Now.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm represent healthcare providers in Medicare audits, ZPIC audits and RAC audits throughout Florida and across the U.S. They also represent physicians, medical groups, nursing homes, home health agencies, pharmacies, hospitals and other healthcare providers and institutions in Medicare and Medicaid investigations, audits, recovery actions and termination from the Medicare or Medicaid Program.
For more information please visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com or call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001.

Comments?

What do you think of CMS’ decision to invoke the moratorium? Do you think this should have been done sooner? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. “CMS Imposes First Affordable Care Act Enrollment Moratoria to Combat Fraud.” CMS.gov. (July 26, 2013). From: http://www.cms.gov/Newsroom/MediaReleaseDatabase/Press-Releases/2013-Press-Releases-Items/2013-07-26.html

Chang, Daniel. “Feds Ban New Home Healthcare Agencies in Miami to Fight Medicare Fraud.” Miami Herald. (July 26, 2013). From: http://www.miamiherald.com/2013/07/26/3524612/feds-ban-new-home-healthcare-agencies.html

Beasley, Deena. “U.S. Bans New Home Health, Ambulance Providers in Three Regions.” Miami Herald. (July 26, 2013). From: http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/07/26/us-medicare-moratoria-idUSBRE96P14P20130726

About the Authors: Lance O. Leider is an attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Avenue, Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

 

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

CMS in the Hot Seat for Lax Oversight of Medicaid Managed Care Organizations

LLA Headshot smBy Lenis L. Archer, J.D., M.P.H., The Health Law Firm

For years, each state has kept an eye on its own Medicaid managed care plans, while the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is required to monitor how well each individual state is doing. However, a recent Government Accountability Office (GAO) report claims CMS is sleeping on the job. The report, released on June 20, 2014, stresses the need for more federal oversight of these plans.

With the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the Medicaid program is expected to expand significantly. Most of the new beneficiaries enrolled in managed care are covered almost entirely by federal funds. The need for federal oversight in this area is of growing importance to ensure accountability of taxpayers’ dollars.

To read the entire report from the GAO, click here.

Report Findings: MCOs Need to be Watched by the Feds.

The persistent theme of the GAO report is that CMS and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) have done little to control the integrity of managed care organizations (MCOs). Federal programs have delegated managed care supervision to each individual state, but fail to provide needed guidelines and resources. CMS has not updated its MCO program guidance since 2000.

The report found neither state nor federal programs are well positioned to identify improper payments made to MCOs. Further, these programs are unable to ensure that MCOs are taking appropriate actions to identify, prevent or discourage improper payments.

For example, the report looked at state program integrity (PI) units and Medicaid Fraud Control Units (MFCU) from seven states. These anti-fraud groups admitted to primarily focusing their efforts on Medicaid fee-for-service claims. Meanwhile, claims made to MCOs have flown under their radar.

GAO Recommendations.

The GAO recommends that CMS:

– Require states to conduct audits of payments to and by MCOs;

– Update its managed care guidance program integrity practices and effective handling of MCO recoveries; and

– Provide states with additional support in overseeing MCO program integrity.

The GAO also suggests that CMS increase its oversight, especially as states expand their Medicaid programs. The GAO report recommends CMS take a bigger role in holding states accountable to ensure adequate program integrity efforts in the Medicaid managed care program. If CMS does not step up to the plate, the report predicts a growing number of federal Medicaid dollars will become vulnerable to improper payments.

The Future of MCOs.

If this report is taken seriously, be assured that audits of MCOs will become more frequent and extensive. If CMS ramps up their efforts, claims could be reviewed in detail by Medicaid integrity contractors. Now is the time to verify you are in compliance and receiving proper payments; before CMS turns the magnifying glass on you or your facility .

Comments?

What do you think of the GAO’s assessment of MCOs? Do you think CMS needs to step up and provide more oversight? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Handling Medicaid Audits, Investigations and other Legal Proceedings.

Medicaid fraud is a serious crime and is vigorously investigated by the state MFCU, the Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA), the Zone Program Integrity Contractors (ZPICs), the FBI, and the Office of Inspector General (OIG) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Other state and federal agencies, including the U.S. Postal Service (USPS), and other law enforcement agencies often participate. Don’t wait until it’s too late. If you are concerned about possible violations and would like a confidential consultation, contact a qualified health attorney familiar with medical billing and audits today. Often Medicaid fraud criminal charges arise out of routine Medicaid audits, probe audits, or patient complaints.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent physicians, dentists, orthodontists, medical groups, clinics, pharmacies, assisted living facilities (AFLs), home health care agencies, nursing homes, group homes and other healthcare providers in Medicaid and Medicare investigations, audits and recovery actions. To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources:

Mullaney, Tim. “Federal Government Needs to Boost Medicaid Managed Care Oversight, GAO Says.” McKnight’s Long-Term Care & Assisted Living. (June 20, 2014). From: http://www.mcknights.com/federal-government-needs-to-boost-medicaid-managed-care-oversight-gao-says/article/356779/

Adamopoulos, Helen. “GAI Calls on CMS to Increase Medicaid Managed Care Oversight.” Becker’s Hospital Review. (June 20, 2014). From: http://www.beckershospitalreview.com/finance/gao-calls-on-cms-to-increase-medicaid-managed-care-oversight.html

Bergal, Jenni. “Advocates Urge More Government Oversight of Medicaid Managed Care.” Kaiser Health News. (July 5, 2013). From: http://www.kaiserhealthnews.org/stories/2013/july/05/medicaid-managed-care-states-quality.aspx?referrer=search

About the Author: Lenis L. Archer is as attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Avenue, Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

 

WellCare Health Plans Reaches Settlement in False Claims Act Case

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

WellCare Health Plans Inc.(WellCare) has reached a $137.5 million settlement with the federal government and nine states. The settlement resolves four lawsuits alleging violations of the False Claims Act.

WellCare is based in Tampa, Florida. The company provides managed health care services for approximately 2.6 million Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries across the United States.

Lawsuits Allege WellCare Submitted False Claims to Medicare, Medicaid Programs.

The lawsuits allege that WellCare submitted false claims to Medicare and Medicaid programs. WellCare allegedly falsely inflated the amount it claimed to be spending on medical care. Allegedly, this was done in order to avoid returning money to Medicaid and other programs in various states, including the Florida Medicaid program and Florida Healthy Kids program. WellCare also allegedly knowingly retained overpayments it had received from Florida Medicaid for infant care. Furthermore, WellCare allegedly falsified data that misrepresented the medical conditions of patients and the treatments they received.

WellCare to Pay the United States and Nine Individual States in Settlement.

WellCare’s settlement requires the company to pay the United States and nine individual states $137.5 million. The nine states are Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, New York, and Ohio. The settlement also requires WellCare to pay an additional $35 million if the company is sold or experiences a change in control within three years of the agreement.

Whistleblowers Share in Settlement.

The four lawsuits against WellCare were filed by whistleblowers under the qui tam provisions of the False Claims Act. The qui tam provisions allow individuals to file lawsuits on behalf of the United States and share in any recovery.

The whistleblower whose qui tam complaint initiated the government’s investigation will receive approximately $20.75 million. The other whistleblowers will share approximately $4.66 million and will also be entitled to receive an additional share of any contingency payment.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in False Claims Act Cases.

The Health Law Firm represents physicians, medical practices, pharmacists, pharmacies, and other health provider in investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, inspections and audits involving government health programs (Medicare, Medicaid, TRICARE). The Health Law Firm also represents health providers in False Claims Act cases.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources Include:

Kutscher, Beth. “WellCare Agrees to Pay Over $137.5 Million in Settlement.” Modern Healthcare. (Apr. 3, 2012). From: http://www.modernhealthcare.com/article/20120403/NEWS/304039975#ixzz1yAklA7rutrk=tynt

U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Public Affairs. “Florida-Based WellCcare Health Plans Agrees to Pay $137.5 Million to Resolve False Claims Act Allegations.” U.S. Department of Justice. (Apr. 3, 2012). From: http://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/2012/April/12-civ-425.html

Voreacos, David. “WellCare to Pay $137.5 Million to Settle False Claims Case.” Bloomberg News. (Apr. 3, 2012). From: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-04-03/wellcare-to-pay-137-5-million-to-settle-false-claims-case-1-.html

About the Author:  George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

Internal Medicine Specialists Should Be Aware of Impending Medicare Audits

6 Indest-2008-3Coming to a medical practice near you. . . It’s scary, it’s horrible, and it could cost you a lot of money!

It’s the dreaded Comprehensive Error Rate Testing (CERT) audit.

The Horror! The Horror!

First Coast Service Options, the Medicare contractor for Florida, announced a new prepayment audit program that will impact Internal Medicine Specialists. The prepayment program is focused on Initial and Subsequent Hospital Evaluation and Management Services, CPT Codes 99223 and 99233. The program is being launched due to the high CERT error rate associated with these codes.

The audits will start on October 21, 2014.

What is the CERT Program?

CMS created the CERT program to measure the paid claims error rate for Medicare claims submitted to Medicare administrative contractors, carriers, durable medical equipment regional carriers, and Medicare Administrative Contractors (MACs). CMS receives more than two billion claims annually. The CERT program randomly selects approximately 120,000 of these claims for review to determine whether the claims were properly paid.

Statistical samples are selected and the CERT documentation contractor (CDC) submits documentation requests to those providers who submitted affected claims. Once the requested documentation has been received, the information is forwarded to the CERT review contractor (CRC) for review. The CRC will review the claims and supporting documentation to measure compliance with Medicare coverage, coding and billing rules. Click here to read my previous blog on the CERT Program.

How Internal Medicine Specialists Can Avoid CERT Audits.

First Coast is only targeting Internal Medicine Specialists as their data analysis suggests the specialty is the primary contributor to an elevated CERT error rate. Errors are normally cause by insufficient documentation to justify the service.

Healthcare providers designated as Internal Medicine with First Coast Service Options need to pay special attention to this audit program and the documentation requirements for billing 99223 and 99233 codes. If you find yourself or your practice the target of a CERT audit, click here for tips on how to respond.

Our Thoughts on the CERT Program.

In working with the CERT Program, we have been pleasantly surprised when our personal phone calls to the CERT auditors have been answered and actual accurate information provided, as well as letters and documents we provided being promptly acknowledged. Like with any other audit, however, we urge those being audited to seek the advice of an experienced health law attorney who may be able to assist in heading off and avoiding a more serious investigation or a large repayment demand.

Comments?

Have you heard of CERT audits? Has your practice encountered a CERT audit? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Don’t Wait Until It’s Too Late; Consult with a Health Law Attorney Experienced in Medicare and Medicaid Issues Now.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm represent healthcare providers in Medicare audits, ZPIC audits and RAC audits throughout Florida and across the U.S. They also represent physicians, medical groups, nursing homes, home health agencies, pharmacies, hospitals and other healthcare providers and institutions in Medicare and Medicaid investigations, audits, recovery actions and termination from the Medicare or Medicaid Program.

For more information please visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com or call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.

Copyright © 1996-2014 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

CMS Recovery Audit Prepayment Reviews to Begin Summer 2012

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is planning to start the Recovery Audit Prepayment Review (RAPR) Demonstration Project on June 1, 2012. It was originally scheduled to begin January 1, 2012.

Recovery Audit Contractors (RACs) to Review Claims with High Rates of Improper Billing.

The Recovery Audit Prepayment Review allows Recovery Audit Contractors (RACs) to review claims before they are paid. The goal is to ensure that the provider complied with all Medicare payment rules. Prepayment reviews will be conducted on certain types of claims that have been found to result in high rates of improper payments.

Certain States will be the Focus of the Initial Launch of Recovery Audit Prepayment Reviews.

The Recovery Audit Prepayment Reviews will focus on states with high populations of fraud-prone and error-prone providers. These states are California, Florida, Illinois, Louisiana, Michigan, New York, and Texas. The Recovery Audit Prepayment Reviews will also include four states with high claims volumes of short inpatient hospital stays. These states are Missouri, North Carolina, Ohio, and Pennsylvania.

More States May be Included in the Recovery Audit Prepayment Reviews in the Future.

CMS is expecting that the prepayment reviews will help lower error rates by preventing improper payments instead of searching for improper payments after they occur. If these reviews are successful, other states will be included in subsequent stages of the Recovery Audit Prepayment Review Demonstration.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Handling Medicare Audits.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent physicians, medical groups, clinics, pharmacies, durable medical equipment (DME) suppliers, home health agencies, nursing homes and other healthcare providers in Medicaid and Medicare investigations, audits and recovery actions.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources:

Reimbursement Management Consultants, Inc. “CMS Recovery Audit Prepayment Review Demonstration Project.” Reimbursement Management Consultants, Inc. (Feb. 9, 2012). From: http://rmcinc.org/word/?p=276

About the Author:  George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

By |2012-06-18T19:57:56+00:00June 1st, 2018|Medicare, The Health Law Firm Blog|1 Comment
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