Osceola County Commissioners Vote to Regulate Pain Management Clinics

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

On October 8, 2012, the Osceola County, Florida, Commissioners unanimously approved an ordinance that will regulate pain management clinics, according to the Orlando Sentinel. The ordinance will take effect on October 31, 2012, and will be in effect for 10 years.

Click here to see the ordinance passed at the Osceola County Commissioner’s meeting.

This is part of the continuing efforts by law enforcement to cut down on prescription drug abuse that plagues the state.

Ordinance Details.

The ordinance spells out what constitutes a pain management clinic, prohibits cash-only payments and requires pain management clinics to provide the names of employees to the county.

The ordinance also requires that clinics participate in the Department of Health’s (DOH) Prescription Drug Monitoring Program. That means pain management doctors will have to track and provide monthly reports on how many prescriptions are issued for controlled substances, and provide certain patient data, such as age ranges, race and gender.

Anyone caught violating these rules will be punished with the loss of their business tax receipt.

Any hospital or physician engaged in short-term treatment of pain (90 days or less) is exempt from the ordinance.

Seminole County Might Be Next.

Seminole County, Florida, Commissioners were set to vote on a similar ordinance at their meeting on October 9, 2012, but heard arguments from doctors. The ordinance will now be considered next month, according to the Orlando Sentinel.

Click here to read the entire article from the Orlando Sentinel.

Don’t Risk Your License. Read These Tips for Pain Management Doctors to Stay Inside the Law.

On top of following the new ordinance, Osceola County doctors and any doctor working in pain management, should read this article on tips to protect themselves from drug-seeking patients.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced with Investigations of Health Professionals and Providers.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm provide legal representation to physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, CRNAs, pain management doctors, dentists, pharmacists, psychologists and other health providers in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) investigations, FBI investigations, Medicare investigations, Medicaid investigations and other types of investigations of health professionals and providers.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

As a healthcare professional, what do you think of this ordinance? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Source:

Breen, David. “Osceola Ordinance Targets Pill Mills.” Orlando Sentinel. (October 9, 2012). From: http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/local/breakingnews/os-osceola-pain-clinic-ordinance-20121009,0,2467210.story

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.

Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Texas Oncologist Accused of Poisoning Coworker/Boyfriend’s Coffee

8 Indest-2008-5By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

A Houston, Texas, doctor is accused of spiking her co-worker’s coffee with a toxic chemical. Both the female doctor and the male co-worker she allegedly tried to poison worked as oncologists at The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. It’s reported the two were also dating at the time of the incident. The female oncologist was allegedly arrested on May 29, 2013, and charged with aggravated assault, according to ABC News.

Click here to read the ABC News article.

I’d like to point out that these are just allegations made against the female oncologist at this point in time and have not been proven by the state. “All persons are innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.” (Cops.)

Do You Take Your Coffee With or Without Antifreeze?

According to Associated Press, January 27, 2013, is when the alleged poisoning actually occurred. The female oncologist allegedly put ethylene glycol in her coworker/boyfriend’s coffee. When he mentioned it was too sweet, she said it was because she added Splenda to it. The female oncologist allegedly made him finish the cup and made him a second glass. It’s reported the second glass contained more of the chemical.

Currently, there is no reported comment from the maker of Splenda regarding the alleged incident.

Victim Left Severely Sick After Alleged Poisoning.

Four hours later, the man allegedly experienced slurred speech, blurred vision and loss of motor skills. At the emergency department he was found to have central nervous system depression, cardiopulmonary complications and renal failure. A test allegedly found crystals consistent with ethylene glycol poisoning, according to ABC News.

Ethylene glycol is present in all M.D. Anderson laboratories, according to the Associated Press. Therefore, the oncologist allegedly had access to the chemical.

Female Oncologist Not Currently Working.

According to the Associated Press, the oncologist accused of doing the poisoning is on paid administrative leave from M.D. Anderson. She has since bonded out of jail, but was ordered to surrender her passport.

To read the entire Associated Press article, click here.

Contact Experienced Health Law Attorneys.

The Health Law Firm routinely represents pharmacists, pharmacies, physicians, nurses and other health providers in investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, inspections and audits involving the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Department of Health (DOH) and other law enforcement agencies. Its attorneys include those who are board certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law as well as licensed health professionals who are also attorneys.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

What do you think of this story? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Shaw, Alexis. “Houston Oncologist Allegedly Poisoned Boyfriend’s Coffee with Antifreeze Chemicals.” ABC News. (June 8, 2013). From: http://abcnews.go.com/US/texas-doctor-accused-lacing-boyfriends-coffee-poison/story?id=19356031#.UbdoB9jgXwk

Associated Press. “Houston Doctor Charged with Poisoning Her Lover.” Associated Press. (June 9, 2013). From: http://www.chron.com/default/article/Houston-doctor-charged-with-poisoning-her-lover-4589978.php

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Disruptive Physicians: Nobody Likes a Nuisance

IndestBy George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law and Christopher E. Brown, J.D., The Health Law Firm

Identifying and eliminating disruptive physicians has become a paramount concern of many hospitals and healthcare systems. Disruptive physicians hinder the safe and orderly operation of a healthcare facility and are considered a threat to the safety of patients. Disruptive behavior can impact staff morale and can increase the risk of liability to all employers.

A recent New York case demonstrates this. According to a journal for surgeons, a New York doctor is being held responsible for an ongoing worker’s compensation bill as the result of a violent outburst he directed toward a physician assistant (PA). The physician allegedly lost his temper during an open-heart surgery when the physician assistant accidentally suctioned some heart tissue. The physician allegedly threatened that he would “throw the physician assistant through the wall” if it happened again.

The physician assistant has claimed that the threat deeply affected her ability to perform her job, as well as put the patient’s safety at risk. A psychologist diagnosed the PA with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) caused by the incident. Unable to work because of the trauma allegedly caused by the disruptive physician, the PA now reportedly collects $2,415 a week in workers’ compensation.

To read the full article from Outpatient Surgery, click here.

Implications of Disruptive Behavior.

Disruptive behavior from a physician can lead to dire consequences for both the physician and his or her employer. Lawsuits and liabilities, such as those in the New York case discussed above, can detract from a safe, cooperative, and professional healthcare environment.

Disruptive behavior can negatively affect the quality of patient care. Hospitals claim that this happens because of conduct that:

–    Disrupts or impedes the operations of the hospital;

–    Adversely affects the ability of others on the healthcare team to do their jobs;

–    Creates an unprofessional or hostile work environment for hospital employees;

–    Interferes with coworkers’ ability to practice competently;

–    Prevents effective communications among healthcare providers and staff;

–    Disrupts the continuity of care a patient receives; and

–    Adversely affect the community’s confidence in the hospital’s ability to provide quality patient care.

Being accused of being a disruptive physician may lead to adverse action against clinical privileges, action to drop the physician from insurance panels, consequential action by the state medical board or licensing authority, loss of specialty certification, termination of employment contracts and other various consequences.

What Conduct May Cause One to be Labeled a Disruptive Physician?

A hospital’s creed, ethical statement, or code of conduct, as well as Joint Commission Standards, and medical staff bylaws can define what constitutes disruptive behavior. Case reports, hospital policies and actual cases in which we have defended physicians demonstrate the types of acts that can be used to label a person as “disruptive.” Disruptive behavior includes, but is not limited to:

–    Verbal attacks that are personal, irrelevant to hospital operations, or exceed the bounds of professional conduct;

–    Shouting, yelling, or the use of profanity;

–    Verbally demeaning, rude or insulting conduct, including exhibiting signs of disdain or disgust;

–    Inappropriate physical conduct, such as pushing, shoving, grabbing, hitting, making obscene gestures, or throwing objects;

–    Inappropriate comments or illustrations made in patient medical records or other official documents, impugning the quality of care in hospital facilities, or attacking particular medical staff members, personnel, or policies;

–    Belittling remarks about the patient care provided by the hospital or any healthcare provider in the presence or vicinity of patients or their families;

–    Non-constructive criticism that is addressed to the recipient in such a way as to intimidate, undermine confidence, belittle, or imply stupidity or incompetence;

–    Refusal to accept, or disparaging or disgruntled acceptance of, medical staff assignments;

–    Inappropriately noisy or loud behavior in patient areas;

–    Making sexual or racial jokes;

–    Physically touching another professional, nurse or staff member, especially those of the opposite sex;

–    Making sexually suggestive remarks;

–    Commenting on another person’s body parts;

–    Threatening violence to another;

–    Throwing surgical equipment, medical supplies, charts, or anything else at or around anyone else; or

–    Other disruptive, abusive, or unprofessional behavior.

I previously wrote a two-part blog series detailing the types of conduct considered disruptive, as well as the consequences associated with disruptive behavior and how you as a physician can avoid such pitfalls. To read part one of the blog series, click here. To read part two of the blog series, click here.

Physicians: Proactively Educate Yourself.

It’s wise to review your hospital’s or institution’s policies on disruptive behavior. Arming yourself with the knowledge necessary to avoid such accusations is imperative in protecting your reputation and career.

No one lives in a glass house, but pretend you do. Someone can always observe your actions in the office or hospital. Once you have been labeled a disruptive physician, others may be closely, at times, scrutinizing you for anything you may do wrong. You will make yourself a target for possible false allegations and accusations. The healthcare industry is a demanding and stressful field. It’s understandable that potential outbursts can occur; control yourself and don’t let them.

Comments?

Have you ever been accused of being a disruptive physician? Have you ever been around one? What are some proactive tactics physicians can take to prevent any outbursts or behavioral conduct that would be deemed as disruptive? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced with Investigations of Health Professionals and Providers.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm provide legal representation to physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, CRNAs, dentists, pharmacists, psychologists and other health providers in accusations of disruptive behavior, Department of Health (DOH) investigations, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) investigations, FBI investigations, Medicare investigations, Medicaid investigations and other types of investigations of health professionals and providers.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Source:

Burger, Jim. “Doc Threatens Physician’s Assistant During Open Heart Surgery: I’m Going to Put Your Through the Wall.” Outpatient Surgery. (July 14, 2014). From: http://www.outpatientsurgery.net/surgical-facility-administration/legal-and-regulatory/doc-threatens-physician-s-assistant-during-open-heart-surgery-i-m-going-to-put-you-through-the-wall–07-14-14

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.

Copyright © 1996-2014 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Most Physicians Not Using the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program

By Danielle M. Murray, J.D.

The Florida Prescription Drug Monitoring Program is apparently collecting dust as physicians are choosing not to use it. The Tampa Bay Times reported on October 5, 2012, that as few as one in twelve doctors have ever used the database. That is about eight percent (8%) of all physicians. Approximately fourteen percent (14%) of physicians are registered for the database.

Click here to read the entire story from the Tampa Bay Times.

Physicians Don’t Want to Use the Database.

Physicians interviewed for the article said the problem is that database use is not mandatory. Physicians are not required to review the database prior to accepting a new patient, or prior to giving out a prescription.  Some physicians said they would ask the pharmacy or check the local arrest records if they had a suspicion that the patient was abusing drugs or “doctor shopping.”

One potential reason that physicians may not check the database is simply that they don’t want to know.  If they know a patient is abusing prescription drugs, then that patient has to be sent away, and that is a loss of business. Another reason could be some doctors may not know the database exists, and other doctors may simply be too busy to bother.

In Some States the Database Is Mandatory.

The prescription drug database in Kentucky had a similar usage problem until the state made it mandatory for physicians to check the database.  A mandatory law in Ohio resulted in shock when physicians saw the reality of the large number of prescription drug abusers in their practices.

For the foreseeable future, using the database will not be mandatory for physicians. However, physicians should consider using the database, or otherwise remaining vigilant to avoid being labeled an overprescriber.

For legal tips for working with pain patients, click here.

Does the Database a Make it Easier to Prosecute?

From my perspective, I have seen the database in Florida used mostly as a tool for prosecution of pain management physicians and pharmacists. Even in cases where the pharmacist has been the one to notify the authorities of suspected forged prescriptions and where the pharmacist has cooperated in prosecuting the criminals, I have seen this database cited as evidence against him or her. I do not believe this is what the legislation intended.

Contact an Attorney Experienced in Department of Health (DOH) and Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) Investigations.

As a health care professional, you may one day be charged with overprescribing narcotics or even criminally charged in the death of a patient due to their drug habits. If you are contacted by the Department of Health (DOH) or the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), do not sign anything or make any statements to anyone. Call an experienced health law attorney to learn about your rights in such a case.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

As a physician, do you use the Florida Prescription Drug Monitoring Program? Why or why not? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Source:

Cox, John Woodrow, “Florida Drug Database Intended to Save Lives is Barely Used by Doctors.” Tampa Bay Times. October 7, 2012. http://www.tampabay.com/news/health/florida-drug-database-intended-to-save-lives-is-barely-used-by-doctors/1255062

About the Author: Danielle M. Murray is an attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.

Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Drug Enforcement Administration Agents Raid Central Florida Pain Management Clinic

8 Indest-2008-5By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) agents along with local police and sheriffs’ deputies raided a Longwood, Florida, pain management clinic on June 14, 2013. According to the Orlando Sentinel, agents searched for evidence at the clinic associated with multiple doctors. DEA agents stated the clinic was operating as a “pill mill” and allegedly diverting legal prescriptions for illegal purposes. No one was arrested during the raid. Longwood is a suburb of Orlando.

Investigation Spreads to South Florida.

According to WESH-TV, during the raid agents took everything from the clinic that could help them build a criminal prosecution. This included paper records, computer equipment and prescription drugs. DEA agents would not say how many people they were investigating, but they did say this raid was the result of a two-year long investigation.

In addition to the Longwood pain clinic, DEA agents said they are also searching locations in Brevard County, Florida, where associates of the Longwood clinic allegedly live.

To watch the WESH-TV report, click here.
Two Doctors Associated With the Longwood Clinic Allegedly “Blacklisted” by Pharmacy.

According to the Orlando Sentinel, two doctors associated with the Longwood clinic were allegedly “blacklisted” in 2011, by CVS Pharmacy. This means that CVS notified those physicians that the pharmacy chain would no longer fill prescriptions they wrote for certain drugs such as oxycodone, due to suspiciously high prescribing rates. To read a previous blog on the CVS blacklist, click here.

Click here to read the entire Orlando Sentinel article.

The Longwood pain clinic is currently closed. Whether this will be temporary or permanent is unknown at this time.

Different Clinic, Similar Storyline.

This raid on the Longwood clinic is just one of the many we’ve recently seen in Florida. DEA agents and local law enforcement officials are not slowing down in their fight against illegal pill mills, and illegal prescribing and dispensing practices. To read a blog on two Orlando-area pharmacists recently arrested on charges of alleged drug trafficking, click here. Even the biggest pharmacy chains are not immune to investigations. Walgreens just agreed to pay $80 million to settle a DEA investigation into the chain’s dispensing practices of prescription drugs. To read more, click here.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced with DEA Cases and Licensing Actions.

The Health Law Firm represents physicians, pharmacists, pharmacies, physicians, nurses and other health providers in investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, inspections and audits involving the DEA, Department of Health (DOH), and other law enforcement agencies.
If you are aware of an investigation of you or your practice, or if you have been contacted by the DEA or DOH, contact an experienced health law attorney immediately.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

What do you think about all of these raids on pharmacies and pain clinics? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

McDaniel, Dave. “Agents Raid Longwood Pain Clinic.” WESH-TV. (June 14, 2013). From: http://www.wesh.com/news/central-florida/seminole-county/agents-raid-longwood-pain-clinic/-/17597106/20572512/-/item/0/-/afpnwwz/-/index.html

Pavuk, Amy. “Agents Raid Longwood Pain Clinic.” Orlando Sentinel. (June 14, 2013). From: http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/local/breakingnews/os-professional-pain-care-raid-20130614,0,3826330.story#tugs_story_display
About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Pediatricians Who Are Targets of Medicaid Audits Should Request Hearings on the Final Audit Report Results

00011_RT8By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

We have recently been contacted by several pediatric practices that were subject to Medicaid audits. In several cases, the pediatricians received the final audit reports (FARs) stating that they owed Medicaid refunds, because of overbillings, in the tens of thousands of dollars.

With such demands for repayment of the alleged overpayments also come:

  1. Fines;
2. Penalties;
3. Requirements to sign agreements to refrain from such practices in the future;
4. Requirements to have personnel retrained; and
5. The specter of future audits.

In many cases, Medicare and Medicaid auditors may swiftly review supporting medical records and overlook key components that support the level of services (or CPT codes) that were billed, erroneously downgrading the code or disallowing the charge completely. Other times the pediatric or medical practice may have only provided partial records and have left out some key records that would support the codes billed.

Challenging the Determination.

Unfortunately, after receipt of the FAR, the only hope of challenging the determination would come by filing a written request or petition for a formal hearing in, specifically, a Medicaid case. In Medicare cases, other interim reviews or appeals are available.

If you have additional records you failed to provide, or if after a thorough review of the records you did provide show that all of the elements of a CPT code you billed (e.g., 99204 or 99205) were documented, then we recommend that you immediately retain the services of a board certified health lawyer experienced with Medicare and Medicaid audits to file a petition for you. Be sure a written request or petition for a formal hearing is filed within the time stated in the letter you receive, even if you must retain an attorney afterwards. Remember that the request must be in writing and must be received by the agency at the address specified before the date in the letter has passed.

You can always work out a settlement agreement, repayment agreement, or agreement for a different resolution of the situation. What you can’t do is to go back and get back your hearing rights after they have expired.

Steps to Take if you Receive Notice of an Audit.

What you should do immediately upon receiving notice of an audit:

 1. Retain the services of a board certified health lawyer who is experienced with such audits.

 2.  In a timely manner, provide all relevant documents pertaining to the audit, properly labeled and pages numbered (note:  in many instances, this may include more than just the minimum documents the audit requested).

 3. Watch for any interim, initial or preliminary audit reports (PARs), and be prepared to rebut it in detail if it requests a refund.

 4. If you receive a FAR demanding a repayment, be prepared to hire a board certified health lawyer who is experienced with such audits, if you have not already done so.

 5. If you disagree with the findings in the FAR, be sure the agency receives your request for a formal hearing to challenge the determination, prior to the date given in the FAR or demand letter.

For additional details, pointers and tips on this subject you may click here to read the prior blog we have published.

For information, details, pointers and tips on the subject of Medicare audits, you may click here to read the prior blog we have published on this.

Comments?

Do you know what to do if you are the target of a Medicaid audit? Did you know about requesting a hearing on the final audit report results? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced with Medicare and Medicaid Cases.

Attorneys with The Health Law Firm represent physicians, medical groups, nursing homes, home health agencies, pharmacies, hospitals and other healthcare providers and institutions in Medicare and Medicaid investigations, audits, recovery actions and termination from the Medicare or Medicaid Program. We also handle Medicare audits, ZPIC audits and RAC audits throughout Florida and across the U.S.

Our attorneys also represent health care professionals and health facilities in qui tam or whistleblower cases both in defending such claims and in bringing such claims. We have developed relationships with recognized experts in health care accounting, health care financing, utilization review, medical review, filling, coding, and other services that assist us in such matters. We have represented doctors, nurses and others as relators in bringing qui tam or whistleblower cases, as well.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.

Copyright © 1996-2014 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

 

Florida Doctor Arrested for Drug Sales and Other Criminal Charges

Drug trafficking charges against a medical doctor are not a new concept, especially in Florida. Recent pill mill busts throughout the state have resulted in an omnipresent DEA, always on the lookout for illegal drug sales by pharmacies, pharmacists, pain management clinics and physicians. However, the recent arrest of a Central Florida doctor extends beyond the run of the mill “pill mill” bust, as the accusations in this case involve sex with a minor and delivering a controlled substance to a minor.

According to Florida Today, this Central Florida doctor was arrested Tuesday following a raid by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement. This is his second arrest after he was charged with possession of marijuana and drug paraphernalia in August.

Tuesday’s arrest resulted from evidence of the doctor’s sexual relationship with a high school student. The doctor was arrested in 2009 after being caught during a traffic stop with bags of marijuana in his car and allegedly having a sexual relationship with the 16-year-old passenger. Although charges were not filed after the girl recanted her evidence and claimed the marijuana was hers, that didn’t put an end to a steady stream of younger girls going into the clinic. According to residents of the area surrounding the clinic, girls were frequently seen going to see the doctor dressed in revealing attire. Aside from teenage patients, residents reported often seeing a line out to the street for people waiting to get into the clinic, a possible indicator of drug trafficking.

Although his medical license has been suspended, this Florida doctor has yet to receive broader drug trafficking charges, despite his huge prescription distribution numbers. According to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, this doctor prescribed 250,000 oxycodone pills in the first eight months of 2011. Compared to the entire state of California, which had 300,000 oxycodone prescriptions in the last six months of 2010, it is evident that this Florida doctor had a major painkiller operation. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement is calling him one of the worst offenders in the state of Florida. Upon further investigation, this doctor and anyone who may have assisted him in the drug trafficking of oxycodone may be charged for this offense.

While the possibility of drug trafficking charges is enough to scare any physician, other criminal charges can be equally damaging, especially depending on how the accused individuals plea to the charges. A health professional’s plea of nolo contendere, which may seem like the safe route, is actually treated the same as a plea of guilty for all purposes. There are ways to defend criminal charges (like the ones against the aforementioned Florida doctor) that can result in a more favorable outcome (e.g., attempting to obtain pre-trial diversion, pre-trial intervention or drug court), but legal advice should be sought from an attorney who frequently represents health care providers before any actions are pursued. To learn more about criminal charges against doctors and other health professionals see this recent post or visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Central Florida Has Been Invaded By Zombies – No Twinkies Means No Food Source

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

You are already aware of Floridians’ fear of zombies, as shown by recent legislation against bath salts. Despite this, there continue to be reports of rampant zombie outbreaks across the Sunshine State. The zombie apocalypse has hit Central Florida, hard. As a citizen of Florida, you know you are not safe; not from zombies, not from British tourists, not from inability to count (notes in an election) and not from the state legislature. To make matters worse, Twinkies, the only food known to mankind that can survive a post-apocalyptic zombie outbreak (reference: Zombieland 2009) or a nuclear holocaust (reference: Family Guy, second season, third episode Dec. 26, 1999), may soon be out of production. Everyone knows Twinkies have a shelf life of 246 years.

Since Florida seems to be the only state infected with this flesh-eating disease, we are taking a poll. Should we be renamed “the Zombie State?”

A Run With the Living Dead in Clermont.

For those of your reading this blog from another state, you’re in luck. There is actual video footage of how bad the zombie outbreak has gotten in Florida. In Clermont, thousands of cardio-enthusiasts showed up to run a 5K course filled with numerous obstacles that forced participants to crawl in the sticky mud to avoid being pricked by barbed wire above and walking along an unstable beam of wood. Unfortunately, the runners were bombarded along the way by the living dead looking for a quick bite to eat. The participants had to protect their brains while running for their lives. Only the fastest survived.

To see video of attack, click here.

Zombies Take Over the University of Central Florida (UCF).

If you are in Florida and were hoping to take shelter on the campus of the University of Central Florida (UCF), you’re too late. From now until December 2, 2012, the campus will be crawling with zombies who have taken to the stage in a production called “Zombie Town: A Documentary Play.”

We’ve heard it’s not bad. Click here to read a review of the performance.

No Twinkies = No Hope.

By now you’ve heard Hostess, the maker of Twinkies, may be on its way to a complete shutdown. As you know, these delicious treats are the only food that can survive a zombie outbreak. If Hostess closes its doors, we are doomed for sure. Thank goodness Hostess and its striking union members are renegotiating. If Hostess does shut down, it’s rumored a Boca Raton, Florida, company will purchase the brand. We can only hope.

To read the latest on the Hostess debacle, click here.

Given the increasing number of zombie attacks in Florida, the price of Twinkies could soar into the hundreds of dollars each in Florida. Doomsday enthusiasts and disenchanted stock market investors are allegedly pouring funds into warehouse loads of Twinkies.

Is the Ban on Synthetic Drugs in Florida Working?

If you remember, Florida Governor Rick Scott signed House Bill 1175 on March 23, 2012. This bill outlawed more than 90 new forms of synthetic drugs. It modified Section 893.03(1)(c), Florida Statutes, by expanding the list of banned hallucinogenic substances in Schedule I of the Florida Comprehensive Abuse Prevention and Control Act. To view Florida HB 1175, click here. To read more on the ban, click here.

HB 1175 was in response to the first known zombie attack in Miami. This cannibalistic attack was allegedly because the one man was high on bath salts. It was rumored that one prominent Florida lawmaker stated that banning bath salts, smiles and other synthetic drugs should help to reduce the reported acts of cannibalism and zombie-like behavior in Florida.

And he was wrong, the walking dead are alive, sort of, and well in Florida.

Contact Experienced Health Law Attorneys.

The Health Law Firm routinely represents pharmacists, pharmacies, physicians, nurses and other health providers in investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, inspections and audits involving the DEA, Department of Health (DOH) and other law enforcement agencies. Its attorneys include those who are board certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law as well as licensed health professionals who are also attorneys.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

What do you think about all the zombies around town? What are you doing to survive? Are you stocking up on Twinkies now? Tell us, do you think we should rename Florida the Zombie state? Vote in a poll on our Facebook page.

Sources:

Armstrong, Cassie. “Zombies Invade Clermont in 5K Challenge.” Florida 360. (November 17, 2012). From: http://www.orlandosentinel.com/multimedia/os-fla360-zombies-invade-clermont-in-5k-challenge,0,110644.story

Palm, Matthew. “Theater review: ‘Zombie Town: A Documentary Play’ from Theatre UCF.” Orlando Sentinel. (November 18, 2012). From: http://www.orlandosentinel.com/community/ucf/os-zombie-town-review-ucf-20121116,0,4007008.story

Hsu, Tiffany. “Hostess, Union to Give Talks Another Chance.” Orlando Sentinel. (Novemeber 2012). From: http://www.orlandosentinel.com/la-fi-mo-twinkies-hostess-union-mediation-20121119,0,4220893.story

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.

Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

New Details Released on Drug Enforcement Administration’s Investigation of Central Florida Pain Management Clinic

8 Indest-2008-5By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

The Drug Enforcement Administration’s (DEA) investigation into a Longwood, Florida, pain management clinic continues. More details are being revealed about the case. DEA agents along with local police and sheriffs’ deputies raided the pain management clinic on June 14, 2013. Agents believe the evidence they have gathered suggests the clinic was operating as a “pill mill,” according to the Orlando Sentinel. Officials allegedly seized evidence at the clinic associated with at least ten (10) doctors and other clinic employees. No one has been arrested yet, but documents filed in federal court in Orlando suggest charges could be coming.

I previously blogged about this raid. Click here to read that blog.

Details of the Investigation.

According to the Orlando Sentinel, the DEA began surveying the alleged pill mill in January 2011, while investigating a doctor shopper. From July 2011 through May 2013, agents monitored the clinic. During the investigation, agents observed long lines outside the clinic, out-of-state license plates and groups of “patients” arriving at the clinic together. All of this behavior, according to authorities, is associated with pain clinics.

More concrete evidence against the pain management clinic, according to police officials, includes:

–  Patients stating that employees discussed selling pain pills and fake MRIs;

–  DEA agents observing drug deals made by patients coming from the clinic, in the vicinity of the clinic;

–  Used needles were found in nearby parking lots; and

–  Two of the clinic’s patients allegedly died from overdoses during the investigation.

Pain Management Clinic Physicians Made Millions.

It’s reported that the pain management clinic hired ten (10) doctors to write illegal prescriptions and employed others to falsify documents. For their willingness to participate in the illegal activity, the physicians allegedly made millions of dollars.

According to the Orlando Sentinel, the bank accounts of the clinic managers were analyzed as part of the investigation. From 2011 to 2013, more than $5.5 million in cash was deposited into the bank accounts of the clinic managers and physicians.

To read the entire article from the Orlando Sentinel, click here.

Keep in mind, at this point, these are just allegations made against the clinic and its employees and nothing has been proven by the state or federal government.

Be Mindful of the Prescription Drug Monitoring Database.

DEA agents used Florida’s prescription drug monitoring database to find out what types of pills and how many pills physicians at the Longwood pain clinic were prescribing. The prescription database was not intended to be used for criminal prosecution or law enforcement purposes. Yet it is routinely being used to prosecute physicians, pharmacists and pharmacies among others.

If You are a Health Care Professional Involved with Pain Management, Keep These Tips Handy.

The raid on the Longwood clinic is just one of the many we’ve recently seen in Florida. DEA agents and local law enforcement officials are not slowing down in their fight against illegal pill mills, and illegal prescribing and dispensing practices. I have represented a number of physicians who have been accused of “overprescribing.”  Some of these were criminal investigations by local law enforcement authorities, such as a county sheriff’s office. Some were investigations by the DEA. Some were investigations by the state licensing agency, such as the Florida Department of Health (DOH).

It is important physicians know how to protect themselves and their licenses from drug-seeking patients.  Click here to read tips I give to physicians I advise on this issue.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced with DEA Cases and Licensing Actions.

The Health Law Firm represents physicians, pharmacists, pharmacies, physicians, nurses and other health providers in investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, inspections and audits involving the DEA, Department of Health (DOH), and other law enforcement agencies.
If you are aware of an investigation of you or your practice, or if you have been contacted by the DEA or DOH, contact an experienced health law attorney immediately.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

What do you think about all of these raids on pharmacies and pain clinics? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Pavuk, Amy. “Rx for Danger: Pain Clinic Owners Made Millions, Hired 10 Doctors to Write Illegal Scripts, Feds Say.” Orlando Sentinel. (June 24, 2013). From: http://www.orlandosentinel.com/health/os-professional-pain-care-longwood-20130624,0,1172890.story

Indest, George. “Drug Enforcement Administration Agents Raid Central Florida Pain Management Clinic.” The Health Law Fir. (June 17, 2013). From: http://thehealthlawfirmblog.wordpress.com/2013/06/17/drug-enforcement-administration-agents-raid-central-florida-pain-management-clinic/

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Sexual Misconduct by Rogue Employees Can Cost Big Money: Your Responsibility as an Employer

2 Indest-2009-1By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Johns Hopkins Health System agreed to shell out $190 million to more than 7,000 women and girls, in one of the largest settlements ever in the United States involving sexual misconduct by a physician.

A gynecologist, practicing in a Baltimore-based Johns Hopkins Hospital, one of the nation’s most prestigious medical institutions, was accused of using a tiny camera to secretly take videos and pictures of his patients. The doctor worked at the hospital for 25 years, but was fired after admitting to the misconduct and surrendering his recording devices to authorities.

This is a chilling example of how employers can be held responsible for “rogue” employees clearly not working under the consent of the employer. In general, employers have a responsibility to properly supervise their employees’ actions. As in this case, failure to do so can cost millions.

Background of the Case.

According to the Wall Street Journal, a co-worker tipped off Johns Hopkins officials that the gynecologist was wearing a pen around his neck that looked like a camera. In February 2013, an investigation revealed that the gynecologist secretly used the device in question to photograph and videotape thousands of women and girls during pelvic exams. The investigation found that the doctor’s camera captured 1,200 videos and 140 images of his patients, that were then stored on his computer. The doctor was fired in February 2013, and committed suicide days later.

Click here to read the entire article from the Wall Street Journal.

“Rogue” Employee.

In this case, Johns Hopkins states that insurance will cover the entire $190 million settlement. The preliminary agreement is awaiting final approval from a judge. In a statement, Johns Hopkins’ attorney said that the hospital was unaware of the doctor’s conduct, and that he had become a “rogue” employee. The hospital sent out letters of apology to the gynecologist’s patient list, calling the incident a “breach of trust.”

Click here to read all of the statements from Johns Hopkins Medicine in regard to this incident.

Employer’s Responsibility.

The lawsuit against Johns Hopkins alleged that the hospital failed to properly supervise the doctor and should have known of his alleged misconduct.

This situation brings up an interesting point, even though the employee was acting on his own accord, the health system would still likely have been held liable if the case was not settled.

Employers are generally “vacariously liable” for their employees’ actions. The basic idea of vicarious liability or the doctrine of respondeat superior is that an employer is held responsible for the negligent acts of its employee that cause injuries to a third party, provided that such acts were committed during the course of and within the scope of the employment.

To establish that the employee’s conduct was within the scope of employment:

1. The conduct must have occurred substantially within the time and space limits authorized by the employment;
2. The employee must have been motivated, at least partially, by a purpose to serve the employer; and
3. The act must have been of a kind that the employee was hired to perform.

In certain circumstances, including the example of the gynecologist, an employer’s vicarious liability can extend to intentional or even criminal acts committed by the employee.

Vicarious liability is a powerful concept and, as evident by the Johns Hopkins case, can result in an employer being responsible for significant sums of money. Employers should institute policies which curb activities that could be injurious to others. The employer has a responsibility to monitor employees and immediately investigate any suspicious activity.

Despite the fact that Johns Hopkins acted quickly, the hospital system will still most likely be left holding a settlement sum of $190 million for actions of an employee.

Comments?

As an employer, how do you make sure your employees aren’t acting on their own or violating company policies and procedures? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Contact Health Attorneys Experienced in Health Law and Employment Law.

The Health Law Firm represents both employers and employees in the health care industry in defending allegations of sexual misconduct and other complaints from employees and patients. We represent employers in unemployment compensation hearings, in defending against EEOC (discrimination) complaints, and in defending litigation involving wage and hour disputes, as well as other types of contract or employment litigation. We also can investigate such allegations and attempt to negotiate settlements where warranted. Our attorneys represent individuals and institutions in litigation, civil or administrative, state or federal.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources:

Linderman, Juliet. “Hopkins Pays $190M in Pelvis Exam Pix Settlement.” Associated Press. (July 22, 2014). From: http://apne.ws/UquXOI

Levitz, Jennifer. “Johns Hopkins Agrees to $190 Million Exam-Photos Settlement.” Wall Street Journal. (July 21, 2014). From: http://online.wsj.com/articles/johns-hopkins-hospital-agrees-to-190-million-exam-photos-settlement-1405961572

Johns Hopkins Hospital. “Statement from Johns Hopkins Medicine on the recent news surrounding Nikita Levy, M.D.” Hopkins Medicine. (July 21, 2014). From: http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/news/Nikita_Levy.html

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

 

The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2014 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

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