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How to Find the Right Attorney for Your Irregular Behavior Case Before the USMLE or ECFMG

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

If you have received a letter from the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Secretariat or the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) accusing you of “irregular behavior,” this is very serious stuff. You need an experienced lawyer to assist you. But how do you find one? This blog will provide several tips on how to locate an experienced effective attorney who will really provide the legal assistance you need.

You Don’t Need a Philadelphia Attorney to Represent You.

First, there are only a handful of attorneys in the United States who have handled more than one of these cases. Even if you find one, this does not mean he or she is really experienced and will really advocate your position before the Committee for Individualized Review (CIR) or the ad hoc committee which is appointed to hear your case. You don’t need an attorney who is actually in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (where the USMLE and the ECFMG have offices and where such hearings are usually held), to represent you. Most of the work is actually done before the hearing.

What you do need is someone who is experienced and knows how to properly prepare you for the nerve-wracking hearing you will have. The attorneys of our firm routinely do this.

What to Look for in an Attorney Before You Select One.

1. First, make sure that the attorney you select actually has ample experience in actually appearing before the committee and representing individuals and has done this multiple times in the past. Ask how many hearings.

2. Second, Look for an attorney who is board certified by their state bar association in the legal specialty of health law. Many states now have such certifications, including Florida, Pennsylvania, and Texas. Board certification in a legal specialty is like board certification in a medical specialty. It is the mark of attaining a higher degree of expertise and excellence. An attorney who is certified in health law will understand the medical issues involved in your case, the impact this can have on your future as a physician and other aspects a criminal law attorney or civil litigation attorney will not.

3. Third, check out the background of each attorney before you hire one. Google them and review everything you can find. Check with the state licensing board or state bar association for adverse actions.

4. Ask the attorney how the attorney exactly how the attorney will prepare you for the hearing. When we prepare an individual for a hearing, we review everything from the physical layout of the hearing room, to exactly how the actual hearing will be conducted, to whom the members of the hearing committee will be. We review how to speak and answer questions effectively and the types of questions that may be asked of you. All of this helps you to be better prepared and less nervous when appearing at the hearing.

5. Ask the attorney if the attorney uses expert witnesses in these cases. In many cases, no expert witness is required. However in some cases experts such as computer technicians, forensic document examiners or handwriting experts, polygraphers (lie detector analysts), statistics experts, or other experts should be hired to provide an expert report for the committee to consider.

6. Find out if the attorney will meet with you in person a week or two prior to the hearing to help prepare you. We always do this. If you cannot come to our office in the Orlando, Florida area (which most people do), we will meet with you via Zoom, Skype, video chat, or just telephonically if necessary.

7. We recommend that you select an attorney who is not a solo practitioner. An attorney who has several attorneys in his firm in the same area of specialty will have additional back up if it is needed. If you hire an attorney who is alone by himself, illness, accidents, family emergencies, and other unforeseen events can cause you to be without legal representation at the last minute.

8. Often the cheapest attorney is not the best one for you. Remember the old saying that “you get what you pay for.” Cheaper is not always better. However, paying the most may not ensure that you get the most effective legal counsel. You must do your homework, finding out the information above.

Contact Us for an Initial Consultation on Your Irregular Behavior Case.

Contact our firm and we will be happy to discuss your irregular behavior case with you before you decide on hiring an attorney.

Contact a Health Care Attorney Experienced in the Representation of Medical Students, Interns, Residents and Applicants, Fellows and Those Involved in Graduate Medical Education, and those being challenged by the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME), the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Secretariat, and the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG)

The Health Law Firm and its attorneys represent interns, residents, fellows and medical school students in disputes with their medical schools, supervisors, residency programs and in dismissal hearings. We have experience representing such individuals and those in graduate medical education programs in various disputes regarding their academic and clinical performance, allegations of substance abuse, failure to complete integral parts training, alleged false or incomplete statements on applications, allegations of impairment (because of abuse or addiction to drugs or alcohol or because of mental or physical issues), because of discrimination due to race, sex, national origin, sexual orientation and any other matters. We routinely help those who have disputes with the National Board fo Medical Examiners (NBME), the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Secretariat, and the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG), including on hearings and appeals concerning “Irregular Behavior,” “unprofessionalism,” and “Irregular Conduct.”

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or toll-free at (888) 331-6620 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620 or Toll-Free: (888) 331-6620.

KeyWords: Irregular behavior defense lawyer, irregular conduct legal representation, graduate medical education (GME) defense attorney, international medical graduate attorney, graduate medical education defense lawyer, lawyer for medical students, medical resident physician attorney, residency program legal dispute, residency program litigation, medical school litigation, legal representation for medical residents, legal dispute with medical school, medical students legal counsel, disruptive physician attorney, impaired medical student legal counsel, impaired resident legal defense attorney, United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) defense lawyer, USMLE defense attorney, National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) defense counsel, Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) defense lawyer, ECFMG defense attorney, legal representation for USMLE investigations, legal representation for NBME investigations, legal representation for irregular behavior, irregular behavior defense attorney, irregular behavior defense counsel, health law attorney, The Health Law Firm reviews, reviews of The Health Law Firm attorneys, Philadelphia attorney for ECFMG hearing, Philadelphia lawyer for NBME hearing, Philadelphia legal counsel for USMLE hearing

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name and a registered service mark of The Health Law Firm, P.A., a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 2020 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

New Policy Changes to USMLE Exams and How They Impact Medical Students, Graduates

Attorney Achal A. AggarwalBy Achal A. Aggarwal, J.D. and Carole C. Schriefer, J.D.

The United States Medical Licensing Examination (“USMLE”) is a three-step examination required to obtain a medical license. It is written and administered by the USMLE Secretariat of the National Board of Medical Examiners (“NBME”) and is sponsored by the Federation of State Medical Boards (“FSMB”) and the USMLE.

Medical students desiring to practice in the U.S. are under immense pressure to not only pass the exams but to excel at them. Specifically, the USMLE Step 1 Examination, the USMLE Step 2 Clinical Knowledge (“CK”) Examination, and the USMLE Step 2 Clinical Skills (“CS”) Examination are the most significant deciding factors that residency programs use for selecting applicants to interview for residency positions. However, a lot is about to change.

Important Policy Changes.

On February 12, 2020, the FSMB and the NBME announced the following policy changes:

1. The Step 1 Exam will be changed to pass/fail grading;

2. The number of examination attempts for each exam will be reduced from six (6) to four (4); and

3. All examinees must pass the Step 1 Exam before taking the Step 2-CS Exam.

Changing the Step 1 Exam to Pass/Fail.

The USMLE has announced that it will change the Step 1 exam’s grading system from a three-digit score to a pass/fail grading system. This change will go into effect on January 1, 2022.  A statement published on the website states that changing to pass/fail could help reduce some of the current overemphasis on USMLE performance while also retaining the ability of medical licensing authorities to use the exam for its primary purpose of medical licensure eligibility. Click here to visit the USMLE website and read the statement.

It appears that USMLE, FSMB, NBME, and the American Medical Association (AMA) are attempting to alleviate the stress and pressure the Step 1 exam puts on medical students. However, this change may cause issues for residency programs that are trying to screen for which students they want to interview.

In the current system, the Step 1 score is a three-digit score that is graded on a bell-curve. The minimum passing score for each Step 1 exam is different and depends on the performance of the total universe of the students who take that particular examination.

The three-digit score helps residency programs assess which students were more likely to excel in their program and which students would not. By changing the exam to a pass/fail scoring system, residency programs will be forced to rely more heavily on the Step 2-CK scores, medical school performance, and overall curriculum vitae.

Greater Emphasis to Be Placed on Step 2-CK Exam.

Currently, the Step 2-CK exam is only the fourth-most deciding factor in how residency programs select applicants for interviews. Approximately 80% of residency program directors stated that it was an important factor, but not the most.

On the other hand, the Step 2-CS exam score is a less influential factor, with only 56% of residency program directors saying that it was essential to their decision. Students should anticipate that the Step 2-CK and Step 2-CS will become more important as program directors shift their attention to the scores of those exams.

For more information click here.

What remains to be seen is how these changes will impact international medical graduates (“IMG”), commonly referred to as “foreign medical graduates.” To distinguish themselves, IMGs often tried to get the highest possible USMLE score, as this was the most objective way for them to be compared to other U.S. medical school students.

Since each domestic and international medical school has its own unique clinical grading system, the USMLE Step 1 was one of the most objective ways to compare residency applicants. Now that Step 1 scoring has been eliminated, it might be harder for IMGs to make themselves attractive to competitive residency programs.

Reducing Overall Exam Attempts from Six to Four.

Additionally, the USMLE is changing the limit on the total number of times an examinee may take the same Step exam from six (6) attempts to four (4) attempts. This means that after the policy is implemented, it will be ineligible to take a Step exam if the examinee has made four (4) prior attempts on that Step exam, including incomplete attempts.

The policy is set to be implemented on July 1, 2021. Learn more about the policy here.

Examinees Must Pass Step 1 Before Taking Step 2-CS.

Although the USMLE has suspended the Step 2-CS exam administration at the present time because of the COVID-19 pandemic, it is set to implement a rule requiring all examinees to pass the Step 1 exam before qualifying to take the Step 2-CS exam.

Implementing such a rule would reduce the USMLE’s burden of administering the Step 2-CS exam multiple times since students will be required to qualify for the exam. Students can currently take the Step 1 exam, Step 2-CS exam, and Step 2-CK exam in any order they choose, depending on the requirements of their medical school. This new rule seeks to shift that burden by funneling students through the Step 1 exam.

The impact of such a change remains to be seen, however, we anticipate that this policy will reduce the testing burden on the USMLE while also maintaining the importance of the Step 1 exam despite changing its scoring to pass/fail.

It does represent a complete shake-up in how the system of testing has previously been administered.

Tips for the New Rules.

The following are suggestions we have concerning the new rules:

1. Take the Step 1 Exam as soon as you can, and begin preparing for the others.

2. Always treat every test administration extremely seriously, as though your future life and career depend on it; they do!

3. Take maximum advantage of commercial preparation courses and always try to take one of the recommended live ones before you take your examination.

4. Take off several weeks prior to the examination and find a hotel within walking distance of the test site where you will take the examination to study. Get rid of all distractions while studying for and immediately prior to taking the examination.

5. Never solicit actual test content or offer to share it with someone else.

For additional common-sense tips on preparing for and taking the USMLE Step exams, see another blog on this subject here.

Contact a Health Care Attorney Experienced in the Representation of Medical Students, Interns, Residents and Applicants, Fellows and Those Involved in Graduate Medical Education, and those being challenged by the National Board fo Medical Examiners (NBME), the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Secretariat, and the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG)

The Health Law Firm and its attorneys represent interns, residents, fellows, and medical school students in disputes with their medical schools, supervisors, residency programs, and in dismissal hearings. We have experience representing such individuals and those in graduate medical education programs in various disputes regarding their academic and clinical performance, allegations of substance abuse, failure to complete integral parts training, alleged false or incomplete statements on applications, allegations of impairment (because of abuse or addiction to drugs or alcohol or because of mental or physical issues), because of discrimination due to race, sex, national origin, sexual orientation, and any other matters. We routinely help those who have disputes with the National Board fo Medical Examiners (NBME), the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Secretariat, and the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG), including on hearings and appeals concerning “Irregular Behavior,” “unprofessionalism,” and “Irregular Conduct.”

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or toll-free at (888) 331-6620 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Authors: Carole C. Schriefer J.D., and Achal A. Aggarwal, M.B.A., J.D. practice health law with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office in the Orlando, Florida area.   1101 Douglas Ave. Suite 1000, Altamonte Springs, FL 32714
Phone: (407) 331-6620 or Toll-Free: (888) 331-6620.  Its regional office is in the Northern Colorado, area. 155 East Boardwalk Drive, Fort Collins, Colorado 80525. Phone: (970) 416-7456.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com

KeyWords: Irregular behavior defense lawyer, irregular conduct legal representation, graduate medical education (GME) defense attorney, international medical graduate attorney, graduate medical education defense lawyer, lawyer for medical students, medical resident physician attorney, residency program legal dispute, residency program litigation, medical school litigation, legal representation for medical residents, legal dispute with medical school, medical students legal counsel, disruptive physician attorney, impaired medical student legal counsel, impaired resident legal defense attorney, United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) defense lawyer, USMLE defense attorney, National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) defense counsel, Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) defense lawyer, ECFMG defense attorney, legal representation for USMLE investigations, legal representation for NBME investigations, legal representation for irregular behavior, irregular behavior defense attorney, irregular behavior defense counsel, health law attorney, The Health Law Firm reviews, reviews of The Health Law Firm attorneys, Philadelphia attorney for ECFMG hearing, Philadelphia lawyer for NBME hearing, Philadelphia legal counsel for USMLE hearing

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of and a registered service mark of The Health Law Firm, P.A., a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 2020 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Significant Changes to USMLE Exams and What They Mean for Medical Students and Graduates

Attorney Achal A. AggarwalBy Achal A. Aggarwal, M.B.A., J.D., and George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

The United States Medical Licensing Examination (“USMLE”) is a three-step examination required to obtain a medical license. It is written and administered by the USMLE Secretariat of the National Board of Medical Examiners (“NBME”) and is sponsored by the Federation of State Medical Boards (“FSMB”) and the USMLE.

Medical students desiring to practice in the U.S. are under immense pressure to not only pass the exams but to excel at them. Specifically, the USMLE Step 1 Examination, the USMLE Step 2 Clinical Knowledge (“CK”) Examination, and the USMLE Step 2 Clinical Skills (“CS”) Examination are the most significant deciding factors that residency programs use for selecting applicants to interview for residency positions. However, a lot is about to change.

Important Policy Changes.

On February 12, 2020, the FSMB and the NBME announced the following policy changes:

1. The Step 1 Exam will be changed to pass/fail grading;

2. The number of examination attempts for each exam will be reduced from six (6) to four (4); and

3. All examinees must pass the Step 1 Exam before taking the Step 2-CS Exam.

Changing the Step 1 Exam to Pass/Fail.

The USMLE has announced that it will change the Step 1 exam’s grading system from a three-digit score to a pass/fail grading system. This change will go into effect on January 1, 2022.  A statement published on the website states that changing to pass/fail could help reduce some of the current overemphasis on USMLE performance while also retaining the ability of medical licensing authorities to use the exam for its primary purpose of medical licensure eligibility. Click here to visit the USMLE website and read the statement.

It appears that USMLE, FSMB, NBME, and the American Medical Association (AMA) are attempting to alleviate the stress and pressure the Step 1 exam puts on medical students. However, this change may cause issues for residency programs that are trying to screen for which students they want to interview.

In the current system, the Step 1 score is a three-digit score that is graded on a bell-curve. The minimum passing score for each Step 1 exam is different and depends on the performance of the total universe of the students who take that particular examination.

The three-digit score helps residency programs assess which students were more likely to excel in their program and which students would not. By changing the exam to a pass/fail scoring system, residency programs will be forced to rely more heavily on the Step 2-CK scores, medical school performance, and overall curriculum vitae.

Greater Emphasis to Be Placed on Step 2-CK Exam.

Currently, the Step 2-CK exam is only the fourth-most deciding factor in how residency programs select applicants for interviews. Approximately 80% of residency program directors stated that it was an important factor, but not the most.

On the other hand, the Step 2-CS exam score is a less influential factor, with only 56% of residency program directors saying that it was essential to their decision. Students should anticipate that the Step 2-CK and Step 2-CS will become more important as program directors shift their attention to the scores of those exams.

For more information click here.

What remains to be seen is how these changes will impact international medical graduates (“IMG”), commonly referred to as “foreign medical graduates.” To distinguish themselves, IMGs often tried to get the highest possible USMLE score, as this was the most objective way for them to be compared to other U.S. medical school students.

Since each domestic and international medical school has its own unique clinical grading system, the USMLE Step 1 was one of the most objective ways to compare residency applicants. Now that Step 1 scoring has been eliminated, it might be harder for IMGs to make themselves attractive to competitive residency programs.

Reducing Overall Exam Attempts from Six to Four.

Additionally, the USMLE is changing the limit on the total number of times an examinee may take the same Step exam from six (6) attempts to four (4) attempts. This means that after the policy is implemented, it will be ineligible to take a Step exam if the examinee has made four (4) prior attempts on that Step exam, including incomplete attempts.

The policy is set to be implemented on July 1, 2021. Learn more about the policy here.

Examinees Must Pass Step 1 Before Taking Step 2-CS.

Although the USMLE has suspended the Step 2-CS exam administration at the present time because of the COVID-19 pandemic, it is set to implement a rule requiring all examinees to pass the Step 1 exam before qualifying to take the Step 2-CS exam.

Implementing such a rule would reduce the USMLE’s burden of administering the Step 2-CS exam multiple times since students will be required to qualify for the exam. Students can currently take the Step 1 exam, Step 2-CS exam, and Step 2-CK exam in any order they choose, depending on the requirements of their medical school. This new rule seeks to shift that burden by funneling students through the Step 1 exam.

The impact of such a change remains to be seen, however, we anticipate that this policy will reduce the testing burden on the USMLE while also maintaining the importance of the Step 1 exam despite changing its scoring to pass/fail.

It does represent a complete shake-up in how the system of testing has previously been administered.

Tips for the New Rules.

The following are suggestions we have concerning the new rules:

1. Take the Step 1 Exam as soon as you can, and begin preparing for the others.

2. Always treat every test administration extremely seriously, as though your future life and career depend on it; they do!

3. Take maximum advantage of commercial preparation courses and always try to take one of the recommended live ones before you take your examination.

4. Take off several weeks prior to the examination and find a hotel within walking distance of the test site where you will take the examination to study. Get rid of all distractions while studying for and immediately prior to taking the examination.

5. Never solicit actual test content or offer to share it with someone else.

For additional common-sense tips on preparing for and taking the USMLE Step exams, see another blog on this subject here.

Contact a Health Care Attorney Experienced in the Representation of Medical Students, Interns, Residents and Applicants, Fellows and Those Involved in Graduate Medical Education, and those being challenged by the National Board fo Medical Examiners (NBME), the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Secretariat, and the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG)

The Health Law Firm and its attorneys represent interns, residents, fellows, and medical school students in disputes with their medical schools, supervisors, residency programs, and in dismissal hearings. We have experience representing such individuals and those in graduate medical education programs in various disputes regarding their academic and clinical performance, allegations of substance abuse, failure to complete integral parts training, alleged false or incomplete statements on applications, allegations of impairment (because of abuse or addiction to drugs or alcohol or because of mental or physical issues), because of discrimination due to race, sex, national origin, sexual orientation, and any other matters. We routinely help those who have disputes with the National Board fo Medical Examiners (NBME), the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Secretariat, and the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG), including on hearings and appeals concerning “Irregular Behavior,” “unprofessionalism,” and “Irregular Conduct.”

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or toll-free at (888) 331-6620 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Authors: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law; he is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, and Achal A. Aggarwal, M.B.A., J.D. Its main office is in Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com. The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave. Suite 1000, Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620, Toll-Free: (888) 331-662.

KeyWords: Irregular behavior defense lawyer, irregular conduct legal representation, graduate medical education (GME) defense attorney, international medical graduate attorney, graduate medical education defense lawyer, lawyer for medical students, medical resident physician attorney, residency program legal dispute, residency program litigation, medical school litigation, legal representation for medical residents, legal dispute with medical school, medical students legal counsel, disruptive physician attorney, impaired medical student legal counsel, impaired resident legal defense attorney, United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) defense lawyer, USMLE defense attorney, National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) defense counsel, Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) defense lawyer, ECFMG defense attorney, legal representation for USMLE investigations, legal representation for NBME investigations, legal representation for irregular behavior, irregular behavior defense attorney, irregular behavior defense counsel, health law attorney, The Health Law Firm reviews, reviews of The Health Law Firm attorneys, Philadelphia attorney for ECFMG hearing, Philadelphia lawyer for NBME hearing, Philadelphia legal counsel for USMLE hearing

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of and a registered service mark of The Health Law Firm, P.A., a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 2020 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

UF Rescinds Prospect For Racist Online Post

George Indest HeadshotBy George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

On June 8, 2020, the University of Florida (UF) reportedly announced via Twitter that it had rescinded its offer of acceptance to a prospective student. The offer was rescinded by the university because of an allegedly racist message posted by the student on social media. According to reports, UF spokesman Steve Orlando stated that the university received multiple e-mails complaining about the post. As a result of the investigation, the student is no longer a UF prospect, according to the announcement.

Social networks provide students, resident physicians, fellows, and clinical professors with opportunities for greater communication, information/experience sharing, collaborative learning, professional interactions, and outreach. However, they can also be dangerous if someone has unprofessional comments or content. Many applicants may not be aware that their social media presence may have an impact on their chances of acceptance, especially for medical students.

Although it is true that we all have a First Amendment right to freedom of speech, by getting up and making a speech that violates a school, institution, or program’s policies, you are asking for trouble. we have had cases of students and of residents getting into trouble for not only allegedly racist FaceBook and Twitter posts and re-posts, but also for “unprofessional” posts and re-posts. These include the use of profanity, racist comments, and “unprofessional” photographs. Those who are students or resident physicians typically are in an environment where there is heightened awareness of and heightened scrutiny regarding such matters. Although they must be provided with “due process of law” before they are terminated, this could be very expensive and result in unnecessary blemishes on a person’s record. If the individual making the comments, posts, or re-posts, hasn’t started yet, then they have far fewer rights and do not have any “interest” that is protectable under due process of law principles. So why take the risk?

How Social Media Can Impact Medical Students and Admissions.

On social media sites, healthcare professionals, including medical students, should always represent themselves in a manner that reflects values of professionalism, integrity, acceptance of diversity, and commitment to ethical behavior. Physicians must be aware that content posted may negatively affect their reputations among patients and colleagues. Basically, your actions online may also affect your medical career, especially for medical students.

In one recent situation, a medical student says the University of New Mexico gave him two options: change his Facebook post or get out. Click here to read more about it.

With the increase in popularity and usage of social media platforms, the American Medical Student Association (AMSA) published Guidelines for Medical Students and Physicians. Click here to read the guidelines in full.

To read about how our firm can assist medical students, residents, and graduates in a variety of legal matters, click here.

Contact a Health Care Attorney Experienced in the Representation of Medical Students, Interns, Residents and Applicants, Fellows, and Those Involved in Graduate Medical Education.

The Health Law Firm and its attorneys represent interns, residents, fellows, and medical school students in disputes with their medical schools, supervisors, residency programs, and in dismissal hearings. We have experience representing such individuals and those in graduate medical education programs in various disputes regarding their academic and clinical performance, allegations of substance abuse, failure to complete integral parts training, alleged false or incomplete statements on applications, allegations of impairment (because of abuse or addiction to drugs or alcohol or because of mental or physical issues), because of discrimination due to race, sex, national origin, sexual orientation and any other matters.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources:

Keating, Jennifer. “Social Media Guidelines for Medical Students and Physicians.” American Medical Student Association (AMSA). (September 15, 2016). Web.

Nelson, Sarah. “Florida student who wrote racist social media post won’t join UF.” Palm Beach Post. (June 10, 2020). Web.

“How Medical School Applicants Should Manage Social Media.” U.S. News. (June 11, 2018). Web.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave. Suite 1000, Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620

KeyWords: Graduate medical education (GME) defense attorney, international medical graduate attorney, graduate medical education defense lawyer, lawyer for medical students, medical resident physician attorney, residency program legal dispute, residency program litigation, medical school litigation, legal representation for medical residents, legal dispute with medical school, medical students legal counsel, disruptive physician attorney, impaired medical student legal counsel, impaired resident legal defense attorney, United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) defense lawyer, USMLE defense attorney, National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) defense counsel, Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) defense lawyer, ECFMG defense attorney, legal representation for USMLE investigations, legal representation for NBME investigations, legal representation for irregular behavior, irregular behavior defense attorney, irregular behavior defense counsel, The Health Law Firm reviews, reviews of The Health Law Firm attorneys, Philadelphia attorney for ECFMG hearing, Philadelphia lawyer for NBME hearing, Philadelphia legal counsel for USMLE hearing

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of and a registered service mark of The Health Law Firm, P.A., a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 2020 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

University of Florida Rescinds Prospect Due to Racist Social Media Post

George Indest HeadshotBy George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

On June 8, 2020, the University of Florida (UF) reportedly announced via Twitter that it had rescinded its offer of acceptance to a prospective student. The offer was rescinded by the university because of an allegedly racist message posted by the student on social media. According to reports, UF spokesman Steve Orlando stated that the university received multiple e-mails complaining about the post. As a result of the investigation, the student is no longer a UF prospect, according to the announcement.

Social networks provide students, resident physicians, fellows, and clinical professors with opportunities for greater communication, information/experience sharing, collaborative learning, professional interactions, and outreach. However, they can also be dangerous if someone has unprofessional comments or content. Many applicants may not be aware that their social media presence may have an impact on their chances of acceptance, especially for medical students.

Although it is true that we all have a First Amendment right to freedom of speech, by getting up and making a speech that violates a school, institution, or program’s policies, you are asking for trouble. we have had cases of students and of residents getting into trouble for not only allegedly racist FaceBook and Twitter posts and re-posts, but also for “unprofessional” posts and re-posts. These include the use of profanity, racist comments, and “unprofessional” photographs. Those who are students or resident physicians typically are in an environment where there is heightened awareness of and heightened scrutiny regarding such matters. Although they must be provided with “due process of law” before they are terminated, this could be very expensive and result in unnecessary blemishes on a person’s record. If the individual making the comments, posts, or re-posts, hasn’t started yet, then they have far fewer rights and do not have any “interest” that is protectable under due process of law principles. So why take the risk?

How Social Media Can Impact Medical Students and Admissions.

On social media sites, healthcare professionals, including medical students, should always represent themselves in a manner that reflects values of professionalism, integrity, acceptance of diversity, and commitment to ethical behavior. Physicians must be aware that content posted may negatively affect their reputations among patients and colleagues. Basically, your actions online may also affect your medical career, especially for medical students.

In one recent situation, a medical student says the University of New Mexico gave him two options: change his Facebook post or get out. Click here to read more about it.

With the increase in popularity and usage of social media platforms, the American Medical Student Association (AMSA) published Guidelines for Medical Students and Physicians. Click here to read the guidelines in full.

To read about how our firm can assist medical students, residents, and graduates in a variety of legal matters, click here.

Contact a Health Care Attorney Experienced in the Representation of Medical Students, Interns, Residents and Applicants, Fellows, and Those Involved in Graduate Medical Education.

The Health Law Firm and its attorneys represent interns, residents, fellows, and medical school students in disputes with their medical schools, supervisors, residency programs, and in dismissal hearings. We have experience representing such individuals and those in graduate medical education programs in various disputes regarding their academic and clinical performance, allegations of substance abuse, failure to complete integral parts training, alleged false or incomplete statements on applications, allegations of impairment (because of abuse or addiction to drugs or alcohol or because of mental or physical issues), because of discrimination due to race, sex, national origin, sexual orientation and any other matters.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources:

Keating, Jennifer. “Social Media Guidelines for Medical Students and Physicians.” American Medical Student Association (AMSA). (September 15, 2016). Web.

Nelson, Sarah. “Florida student who wrote racist social media post won’t join UF.” Palm Beach Post. (June 10, 2020). Web.

“How Medical School Applicants Should Manage Social Media.” U.S. News. (June 11, 2018). Web.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave. Suite 1000, Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620

KeyWords: Graduate medical education (GME) defense attorney, international medical graduate attorney, graduate medical education defense lawyer, lawyer for medical students, medical resident physician attorney, residency program legal dispute, residency program litigation, medical school litigation, legal representation for medical residents, legal dispute with medical school, medical students legal counsel, disruptive physician attorney, impaired medical student legal counsel, impaired resident legal defense attorney, United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) defense lawyer, USMLE defense attorney, National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) defense counsel, Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) defense lawyer, ECFMG defense attorney, legal representation for USMLE investigations, legal representation for NBME investigations, legal representation for irregular behavior, irregular behavior defense attorney, irregular behavior defense counsel, The Health Law Firm reviews, reviews of The Health Law Firm attorneys, Philadelphia attorney for ECFMG hearing, Philadelphia lawyer for NBME hearing, Philadelphia legal counsel for USMLE hearing

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of and a registered service mark of The Health Law Firm, P.A., a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 2020 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Got a Letter From the USMLE Secretariat Accusing You of Irregular Behavior on the November 2019 Step 2 CS Exam? You Need Legal Help!

George Indest HeadshotBy George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law
Have you recently received a letter from the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Secretariat or the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) accusing you of irregular behavior? We have recently been made aware of letters being sent out in January to a number of those who took the Step 2 CS Exam in Houston.

Allegations are being made that some of the test takers (and we understand that there were hundreds taking Step 2 CS prep courses and studying before the examination) may have had actual information from the exam that they were sharing.

The USMLE has often made allegations of this nature regarding notes, outlines, and other materials that individual students and study groups have assembled on their own, using their deductive reasoning and experience. They often accuse the students of having obtained the information directly from the tests, which is, of course, a violation of USMLE and ECFMG policies.

You must challenge such allegations of irregular behavior, explain and refute them and request a hearing on them. Otherwise, you are likely to be found guilty of having committed “irregular behavior” which most medical and residency program administrators and directors consider the same as cheating. Furthermore, if that happens, then all of your future transcripts of your USMLE test scores are then stamped with “IRREGULAR BEHAVIOR” and a letter with the charges against you is attached to it. It then goes with the transcripts whenever they are sent out in the future. This could ruin your chances of getting a license, chances of getting a good residency program and could ruin your whole career as a physician.

Other Types of “Irregular Behavior.”

Examples of the types of conduct which we have seen before include:

– Attending a commercial USMLE preparation course that provides some of the actual examination questions.

– Soliciting information on the contents or questions on the examination.

– Using a cell phone during the examination.

– Talking with another person during the examination.

– Sharing information on the types of questions or cases that were on your examination with another person or a blog over the internet.

These are just a few. For more examples, please see another blog I wrote on this by clicking here.

What Should You Do?

What should you do if you find yourself in this situation?

1. First of all, don’t panic. Read the letter carefully and figure out exactly what is being charged against you.

2. Do not delete or destroy any e-mails, test prep materials or study materials you have on your computer. Your attorney may be able to use these to help defend you.

3. Retain the services of a good, experienced health law attorney who is familiar with the USMLE, ECFMG, and the hearings and proceedings these organizations have. By experience, I mean someone who has represented individuals accused of irregular behavior at the hearings held in Philadelphia on this. Retain one right away.

4. Check the background of whatever attorney you consider hiring to make sure he has the experience and has no unfavorable actions against him in his background.

5. Obtain copies of any receipts you may have had for prep courses and prep materials you ordered or took.

6. Your attorney will request a copy of any files or investigation the USMLE or ECFMG has on you so that you can see what you may need to refute.

7. Do not let the time period go by for requesting a hearing and submitting information and documents.

8. Start obtaining character reference letters and copies of any awards, achievements or accomplishments you have.

9. Submit a good, well-organized package of documents to the organization for the hearing.

10. Request an in-person hearing and be prepared to get to Philadelphia a day ahead of time to work with your attorney to prepare for the hearing.

The foregoing are just a few of the many steps that I try to follow in every case.

Our attorneys have represented many individuals in many different hearings, appeals and test challenges over the years. We can help you.

Again, it is crucial to act decisively and act promptly to prove your innocence and preserve your valuable career in medicine. Click here to learn more about how the firm can help you with USMLE and irregular behavior matters.

Contact a Health Care Attorney Experienced in the Representation of Medical Students, Interns, Residents and Applicants, Fellows and Those Involved in Graduate Medical Education, and those being challenged by the National Board fo Medical Examiners (NBME), the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Secretariat , and the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG)

The Health Law Firm and its attorneys represent interns, residents, fellows and medical school students in disputes with their medical schools, supervisors, residency programs and in dismissal hearings. We have experience representing such individuals and those in graduate medical education programs in various disputes regarding their academic and clinical performance, allegations of substance abuse, failure to complete integral parts training, alleged false or incomplete statements on applications, allegations of impairment (because of abuse or addiction to drugs or alcohol or because of mental or physical issues), because of discrimination due to race, sex, national origin, sexual orientation and any other matters. We routinely help those who have disputes with the National Board fo Medical Examiners (NBME), the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Secretariat , and the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG), including on hearings and appeals concerning “Irregular Behavior,” “unprofessionalism,” and “Irregular Conduct.”

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620

KeyWords: Irregular behavior defense lawyer, irregular conduct legal representation, graduate medical education (GME) defense attorney, international medical graduate attorney, graduate medical education defense lawyer, lawyer for medical students, medical resident physician attorney, residency program legal dispute, residency program litigation, medical school litigation, legal representation for medical residents, legal dispute with medical school, medical students legal counsel, disruptive physician attorney, impaired medical student legal counsel, impaired resident legal defense attorney, United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) defense lawyer, USMLE defense attorney, National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) defense counsel, Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) defense lawyer, ECFMG defense attorney, legal representation for USMLE investigations, legal representation for NBME investigations, legal representation for irregular behavior, irregular behavior defense attorney, irregular behavior defense counsel, health law attorney, The Health Law Firm reviews, reviews of The Health Law Firm attorneys, Philadelphia attorney for ECFMG hearing, Philadelphia lawyer for NBME hearing, Philadelphia legal counsel for USMLE hearing

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of and a registered service mark of The Health Law Firm, P.A., a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 2020 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

12 Tips on Protecting Your Rights and Defending Yourself Against Irregular Behavior Charges from the USMLE

Attorney George F. Indest HeadshotBy George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

If you are one of those unlucky individuals who have been accused of irregular behavior by the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Secretariat, then it is extremely important for you to know this information.

USMLE hearings on irregular behavior are almost always held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, before a large committee the committee on individual review or “CIR,” appointed to hear such cases. The committee is composed of medical school professors, doctors, medical school administrators, members of various medical specialty associations, and others. The hearings are held in one of the conference rooms of the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Building in Philadelphia.

We routinely represent medical students and graduates who have taken the USMLE Step exams and have later been accused of irregular behavior. This includes hearings, appeals and other legal matters involving the Step Exams, credentials, responding to inquiries about the misconduct of school officials and related matters.

What is Irregular Behavior?

Irregular behavior can include many different types of action. We have seen cases in which someone set the test center building on fire in order to have the test (which was ongoing) canceled with irregular behavior because they wrote on their hand or their arm or ankle during the examination. We have seen individuals charged with irregular behavior because they had handwriting on the bottom of a flip flop or a sheet of toilet paper; we have seen individuals charged with irregular behavior because they used their iPhone during a break or they were not still in medical school on the day the Step exam was given. We have seen those charged with irregular behavior for altering their test scores on their test transcripts, even though they received a passing grade and because they posted “Me too” on a website where someone had asked if anyone had copies of “The Houston Cases” or wanted them.

We have seen those charged with irregular behavior because they posted information on an Internet website that the USMLE thought was too similar to actual test materials. We have seen individuals charged because they used forged documents to obtain access to the test or to apply to monitor’s instructions at the test center. We have seen individuals charged with irregular behavior for sending forged test scores to their medical school. We have seen applicants charged with irregular behavior for not following the monitor’s directions at the test center. We have represented test-takers who were accused of irregular behavior because their test answers were too “statistically similar” to those of another test taker who took the test at a different location and date.

We have represented medical students charged with irregular behavior because they had completed their USMLE applications incorrectly, using the information that their medical school officials had told them to place on the forms. We have represented medical school students charged with irregular behavior because their medical schools had placed the wrong information on their cation forms (note: later the medical school itself was found to have been guilty of irregular behavior by the organization.)

However, allegations of irregular behavior can usually be easily overcome with an explanation of the truth. It is up to you (and us, if you hire us) to present the truth as to what really happened and why it happened.

Although it is our best advice that you retain the services of an experienced health lawyer, specifically one experienced in dealing with the USMLE and in representing applicants in USMLEor

Tips for Preparing for a Hearing Before the Committee on Individual Review of the USMLE.

Following are several of the most important tips we can present on how to best prepare for a hearing before the Committee on Individual Review of charges of Irregular Behavior.

1. Be sure to request a complete copy of the USMLE’s file and work case, including any investigation, incident reports, videos, or other materials, before you file a response, in writing.

2. Be sure that you file your statement, explanation, or other appropriate documents (depending on the facts and circumstances of your case) prior to the deadline given in the initial letter to you. Document its transmission to and receipt by the USMLE.

3. If you need an extension of time, request this in writing prior to the expiration of the deadline given to you in the original letter. Do this in writing and keep a copy.

4. Be sure that you request in writing a hearing and to appear in person at the hearing prior to the deadline given in the initial letter to you. (Note: if are already going to appear at the same hearing meeting, we can give you a discount from our normal legal fees for this representation. Ask about this.)

5. If you are unable to appear in person at the hearing in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on the date provided in the initial letter, ask that your hearing be postponed until the next available date, and provide good, sufficient reasons why you are unable to attend on the original date given.

6. Be very careful and deliberate about what you state in writing. Any statement you make should be well-organized, professionally prepared, and supported by adequate, relevant, affidavits and documents. This is another reason why you should have an attorney preparing and submitting this for you.

7. In some cases, we recommend hiring an expert to review the case and provide us an expert affidavit to submit. This may be the case when confronted with charges based on statistical analysis, computer systems issue, testing procedures, questionable documents, or other technical matters.

8. Your statement and presentation should directly address the allegations made against you. You are strongly encouraged to review the blog I previously wrote on preparing professional correspondence here.

9. Never lie or submit any false information or documents. The USMLE will thoroughly investigate any suspicious or questionable facts or materials you submit. This can extend to the use of private investigators to locate and interview witnesses, forged documents, or questioned document examiners to analyze documents submitted, and other such methods. Submitting any false information can lead to vastly more severe actions against you.

10. Get prepared for your hearing. Think about and rehearse what you will say. You will be under a lot of stress, in front of about 20 people, most of whom will be asking questions to you. If you are not ready for this, it will be to your detriment.

11. Expect the usual questions. But then, also expect the unusual questions that you may be asked. Plan for what questions may be asked by the Committee members. We always prepare our clients to testify and to be prepared to answer various questions that we know are likely to be asked.

12. Remember that you will be in an unusual, stressful, situation, one which you have probably never experienced before. Plan for this. Obtain as much information about the situation as you can. If you are not used to attending contentious hearings and being cross-examined and interrogated (which 99.9% of doctors are not), then you need to have an experienced attorney sitting next to you.

These are important matters that will affect your future career as a physician. Consider how much in time you have spent and how much in tuition, fees and student loans you have incurred to get this far. Is it smart to scrimp at this point in time and take the cheap way out by either trying to represent yourself or finding a cheap, inexperienced attorney to represent you?

Click here to read one of my prior blogs on the consequences of irregular behavior.

Contact a Health Care Attorney Experienced in the Representation of Medical Students, Interns, Residents and Applicants, Fellows and Those Involved in Graduate Medical Education, and those being challenged by the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME), the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Secretariat, and the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG)

The Health Law Firm and its attorneys represent interns, residents, fellows and medical school students in disputes with their medical schools, supervisors, residency programs and in dismissal hearings. We have experience representing such individuals and those in graduate medical education programs in various disputes regarding their academic and clinical performance, allegations of substance abuse, failure to complete integral parts training, alleged false or incomplete statements on applications, allegations of impairment (because of abuse or addiction to drugs or alcohol or because of mental or physical issues), because of discrimination due to race, sex, national origin, sexual orientation and any other matters. We routinely help those who have disputes with the National Board fo Medical Examiners (NBME), the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Secretariat , and the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG), including on hearings and appeals concerning “Irregular Behavior,” “unprofessionalism,” and “Irregular Conduct.”

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620

KeyWords: Irregular behavior defense lawyer, irregular conduct legal representation, graduate medical education (GME) defense attorney, international medical graduate attorney, graduate medical education defense lawyer, lawyer for medical students, medical resident physician attorney, residency program legal dispute, residency program litigation, medical school litigation, legal representation for medical residents, legal dispute with medical school, medical students legal counsel, disruptive physician attorney, impaired medical student legal counsel, impaired resident legal defense attorney, United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) defense lawyer, USMLE defense attorney, National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) defense counsel, Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) defense lawyer, ECFMG defense attorney, legal representation for USMLE investigations, legal representation for NBME investigations, legal representation for irregular behavior, irregular behavior defense attorney, irregular behavior defense counsel, health law attorney, The Health Law Firm reviews, reviews of The Health Law Firm attorneys, Philadelphia attorney for ECFMG hearing, Philadelphia lawyer for NBME hearing, Philadelphia legal counsel for USMLE hearing

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name and a registered service mark of The Health Law Firm, P.A., a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 2019 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

ECFMG Hearing on Irregular Behavior? Tips on Protecting Your Rights and Preparing

George Indest HeadshotBy George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

If you are one of those unlucky individuals who have been accused of irregular behavior by the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG), then it is extremely important for you to know this information.

ECFMG hearings on irregular behavior are almost always held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania before a large committee appointed to hear such cases. The committee is composed of doctors, medical school administrators, members of various medical specialty associations, and others. The hearings are usually held in a conference room of a large hotel, in closed session (not open to the public).

Since live witnesses (other than yourself) are not permitted, it is very important that any witness testimony of any kind be reduced to writing, preferably in the form of an affidavit, and submitted prior to the deadline you are provided.

Although it is our best advice that you retain the services of an experienced health lawyer, specifically one experienced in dealing with the ECFMG and in representing applicants in ECFMG hearings on irregular behavior, below we have listed helpful tips we have gathered through our years of experience.

The following are some tips to assist in ensuring your rights are protected.

1. Be sure to request a complete copy of the ECFMG’s file and work case, including any investigation, incident reports, videos, or other materials, before you file a response.

2. Be sure that you file your statement, explanation, or other appropriate documents (depending on the facts and circumstances of your case) prior to the deadline given in the initial letter to you. Document its transition and receipt.

3. If you need an extension of time, request this in writing prior to the expiration of the deadline given to you in the original letter. Do this in writing and keep a copy.

4. Be sure that you request in writing a hearing and to appear in person at the hearing prior to the deadline given in the initial letter to you.

5. If you are unable to appear in person at the hearing in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on the date provided in the initial letter, ask that your hearing be postponed until the next available date, and provide good, sufficient reasons why you are unable to attend on the original date given.

6. Be very careful and deliberate about what you state in writing. Any statement you make should be well-organized, professionally prepared, and supported by adequate, relevant, affidavits and documents. This is another reason why you should have an attorney preparing and submitting this for you.

7. In some cases, we recommend hiring an expert to review the case and provide us an expert affidavit to submit. This may be the case when confronted with charges based on statistical analysis, computer systems issue, testing procedures, questionable documents, or other technical matters.

8. Your statement and presentation should directly address the allegations made against you. You are strongly encouraged to review the blog I previously wrote on preparing professional correspondence.

9. Never lie or submit any false information or documents. The ECFMG will thoroughly investigate any suspicious or questionable facts or materials you submit. This can extend to the use of private investigators to locate and interview witnesses, the use of questioned document examiners to analyze documents submitted, and other such methods.

10. Get prepared for your hearing. Think about and rehearse what you will say. You will be under a lot of stress, in front of about 20 people, most of whom will be asking questions to you. If you are not ready for this, it will be to your detriment.

11. Expect the usual questions. But then, also expect the unusual questions that you may be asked. Plan for what questions may be asked by the Committee members. We always prepare our clients to testify and to be prepared to answer various questions that we know are likely to be asked.

12. Remember that you will be in an alien situation, one which you have probably never experienced before. Plan for this. Obtain as much information about the situation as you can. If you are not used to attending contentious hearings and being cross-examined and interrogated (which 99.9% of doctors are not), then you need to have an experienced attorney sitting next to you.

These are important matters that will affect your future career as a physician. Consider how much time you have spent and how much in tuition, fees and student loans you have incurred to get this far. Is it smart to scrimp at this point in time and take the cheap way out by either trying to represent yourself or finding a cheap, inexperienced attorney to represent you?

Contact a Health Care Attorney Experienced in the Representation of Medical Students, Interns, Residents and Applicants, Fellows and Those Involved in Graduate Medical Education, and those being challenged by the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME), the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Secretariat, and the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG)

The Health Law Firm and its attorneys represent interns, residents, fellows and medical school students in disputes with their medical schools, supervisors, residency programs and in dismissal hearings. We have experience representing such individuals and those in graduate medical education programs in various disputes regarding their academic and clinical performance, allegations of substance abuse, failure to complete integral parts training, alleged false or incomplete statements on applications, allegations of impairment (because of abuse or addiction to drugs or alcohol or because of mental or physical issues), because of discrimination due to race, sex, national origin, sexual orientation and any other matters. We routinely help those who have disputes with the National Board fo Medical Examiners (NBME), the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Secretariat , and the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG), including on hearings and appeals concerning “Irregular Behavior,” “unprofessionalism,” and “Irregular Conduct.”

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620

KeyWords: Irregular behavior defense lawyer, irregular conduct legal representation, graduate medical education (GME) defense attorney, international medical graduate attorney, graduate medical education defense lawyer, lawyer for medical students, medical resident physician attorney, residency program legal dispute, residency program litigation, medical school litigation, legal representation for medical residents, legal dispute with medical school, medical students legal counsel, disruptive physician attorney, impaired medical student legal counsel, impaired resident legal defense attorney, United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) defense lawyer, USMLE defense attorney, National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) defense counsel, Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) defense lawyer, ECFMG defense attorney, legal representation for USMLE investigations, legal representation for NBME investigations, legal representation for irregular behavior, irregular behavior defense attorney, irregular behavior defense counsel, health law attorney, The Health Law Firm reviews, reviews of The Health Law Firm attorneys, Philadelphia attorney for ECFMG hearing, Philadelphia lawyer for NBME hearing, Philadelphia legal counsel for USMLE hearing

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name and a registered service mark of The Health Law Firm, P.A., a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 2019 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

C:\Users\katie\Downloads\ECFMG Hearings.wpd

Here Are Some Common Sense Tips for Taking Your USMLE Step Exams and Scoring Higher

George Indest HeadshotBy George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Here are some common-sense tips you should be sure you follow that may help you to reduce stress and score higher when you take your United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step examinations. You should be doing everything within your control to minimize your stress and the risk of being late for the examination. Again, these are common sense and if you have taken a lot of standardized examinations, you may already be aware of these.

1. Do not plan on driving to the test site from your home the morning of the examination even if you leave in the same city as the testing center.

a. Unexpected car problems could occur.
b. Traffic backups and delays always occur.
c. Accidents always happen.
d. Road problems, construction delays, and detours are common.

Eliminate these unnecessary risks.

2. Find the hotel closest to the testing center and stay there the night before the test. Hopefully, this will be within walking distance of the test site if it is necessary to walk there.

3. Read all of the applicable testing procedures, the applicable USMLE and/or Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates ( ECFMG) Handbook, Guidelines and Procedures again the day before the examination you are taking. You signed an agreement to be bound by these and you are expected to know these for the examination. Be sure you understand how scheduled and unscheduled breaks work, how the time is accounted and what you are allowed to do and prohibited from doing on breaks.

4. Make sure you know ahead of time exactly how much time you will be given for each part of the examination and for breaks, Be sure you have calculated how much time you have for each question on each section of the examination, answer within the times you have calculated and move on through the examination in a timely manner.

5. Do not let other occurrences and disturbances in the testing center upset you or distract you.

6. If some extremely disruptive event occurs, for example, fire alarms and evacuations taking place, other examination takers having seizures and being removed by paramedics, etc., consider leaving and taking an incomplete on this examination. Be sure to ask the test center monitors/proctors to file an incident report on what occurred at the test center, Then, within 24 hours, write to the USMLE and ECFMG and advise the organization of exactly what happened and why you had to leave.

7. Bring your own lunch, snacks, and beverages, including something like energy bars or chocolate bars, to provide needed sustenance. Do not leave the testing center for lunch unless you absolutely have to, and then, stay local and on foot. Do not take the risk of driving someplace and back.

8. If a certain testing center has a bad reputation for being a poor testing site or having frequent computer failures, schedule to take the test at a site in another city or state. Travel there and stay at a hotel within walking distance of the test site, perhaps a few days before the examination date. You can then use the additional time and isolation for additional studying and test preparation.

9. Do not refer to or use any cell phone, tablet or personal device while the test is still underway. Be sure you are familiar with all test-taking procedures.

10. To avoid any risks of misunderstandings, do not write down anything during the examination or about the examination at the testing center. Outside during lunch, may be okay; otherwise, wait till you get back home.

Although common sense, you would be surprised at how many test-takers violate these common-sense tips and then suffer from the consequences.

Plan for and have as stress-free of an examination as you can. Control the controllable.

For more helpful tips and to learn more about examples of “Irregular Behavior,” click here to read my prior blog.

Additionally, click here to view one of our blogs on our experience with the USMLE, ECFMG, and NBME, and Hearings on “Irregular Behavior.”

Contact a Health Care Attorney Experienced in the Representation of Medical Students, Interns, Residents and Applicants, Fellows and Those Involved in Graduate Medical Education, and those being challenged by the National Board fo Medical Examiners (NBME), the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Secretariat , and the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG)

The Health Law Firm and its attorneys represent interns, residents, fellows and medical school students in disputes with their medical schools, supervisors, residency programs and in dismissal hearings. We have experience representing such individuals and those in graduate medical education programs in various disputes regarding their academic and clinical performance, allegations of substance abuse, failure to complete integral parts training, alleged false or incomplete statements on applications, allegations of impairment (because of abuse or addiction to drugs or alcohol or because of mental or physical issues), because of discrimination due to race, sex, national origin, sexual orientation and any other matters. We routinely help those who have disputes with the National Board fo Medical Examiners (NBME), the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Secretariat , and the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG), including on hearings and appeals concerning “Irregular Behavior,” “unprofessionalism,” and “Irregular Conduct.”

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620

KeyWords: Irregular behavior defense lawyer, irregular conduct legal representation, graduate medical education (GME) defense attorney, international medical graduate attorney, graduate medical education defense lawyer, lawyer for medical students, medical resident physician attorney, residency program legal dispute, residency program litigation, medical school litigation, legal representation for medical residents, legal dispute with medical school, medical students legal counsel, disruptive physician attorney, impaired medical student legal counsel, impaired resident legal defense attorney, United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) defense lawyer, USMLE defense attorney, National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) defense counsel, Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) defense lawyer, ECFMG defense attorney, legal representation for USMLE investigations, legal representation for NBME investigations, legal representation for irregular behavior, irregular behavior defense attorney, irregular behavior defense counsel, health law attorney, The Health Law Firm reviews, reviews of The Health Law Firm attorneys, Philadelphia attorney for ECFMG hearing, Philadelphia lawyer for NBME hearing, Philadelphia legal counsel for USMLE hearing

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of and a registered service mark of The Health Law Firm, P.A., a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 2019 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Many Actions Can Result in Allegations of Irregular Behavior or Irregular Conduct

George Indest headshotBy George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

I have written many blogs in the past, on allegations of irregular behavior being brought against medical students, foreign medical graduates and others applying to take examinations to qualify for a medical license in the United States. These have previously focused on charges made by the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Secretariat (an affiliate of the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME)) and the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG). In this blog, I will discuss similar allegations made by the National Osteopathic Board of Medical Examiners (NBOME) and the types of actions that are considered “irregular conduct.”

To read several of my prior blogs on these topics, click here to read one on common mistakes made on the USMLE exam or click here to read one on what to do if you receive an inquiry from the USMLE, ECFMG, or NBME.

Charges of “Irregular Behavior” or “Irregular Conduct” Are Similar No Matter What Organization Made Them.

The NBOME is the organization that confirms credentials, tests and regulates osteopathic physicians applying for licenses in the United States.

Like the other organizations mentioned above, it has certain types of conduct (or misconduct) it prohibits that can result in adverse actions being taken against the applicant. The USMLE and the ECFMG refer to these as “Irregular Behavior.” The NBOME refers to these as “Irregular Conduct.” They include, for example, actions that could be termed “cheating” or attempting to gain an unfair advantage on an examination or providing false information on an application.

Irregular Conduct: Definition.

The NBOME defines the term “Irregular Conduct” to include:

any behavior on the part of any candidate [applicant] that violates the integrity or security of the examination, behavior that is disruptive to administration of the examination, or behavior deemed by the NBOME in its sole discretion to be inappropriate in connection with the application, registration, taking, administration, integrity, and security of any NBOME examination.

The key part to this definition is that the NBOME reserves the right to make such determinations “in its sole discretion,” which is a subjective standard that is usually not subject to being second-guessed by a court or other agency.

Examples of “Irregular Conduct.”

The Bulletin of the NBOME provides the following as examples of Irregular Conduct:

1. Copying, fraud, deceit, or other dishonest conduct.

2. Refusal to provide a proper ID or permit photo documentation or other identification for ID verification at any time. Providing false or forged identification upon presentation for testing at a test center. It should be noted that this is to ensure the test-taker is the correct individual and that a “ringer” is not being used.

3. Communication or attempts to communicate with others during the examination other than authorized test center professional staff.

4. Removal of or attempts to remove any test material, scrap paper, or whiteboard from the assigned test area. These organizations are very serious about protecting the integrity of the examination questions and answers, so they go overboard to protect them.

5. Non-compliance with test center rules and regulations and security requirements, including operating test center equipment without reasonable care. This is self-explanatory.

6. Providing or receiving unauthorized information about the content of an examination. We have seen numerous cases of this occurring (or at least being charged against applicants) as a result in participation in Internet listervs and forums on these examinations. Even asking for “cases,” “questions,” or “subjects” from an examination may result in an allegation of irregular conduct.

7. Violation of the NBOME’s non-disclosure or confidentiality policies or the candidate’s non-disclosure agreement.

8. Communication or attempts to communicate about the content, format, or specific test items with another candidate or with any outside source or party (including use of telephones, personal computers, internet access, test review companies, or any other means) at any time, either before, during, or after an examination. See the comments directly above. Posting, downloading or requesting such materials from others has been charged as irregular conduct.

9. Using or having available or access to any unauthorized device, text, notes, or other material that could assist the candidate in taking the examination. Bringing personal property into the test area is considered by the NBOME to violate the security of the examination. This would include, for example, an iPad, smartphone, smartwatch or other types of electronic devices that can access the Internet or notes, “crib sheets,” outlines, or any other type of written assistance.

10. Providing false admittance information or altering applications, score reports, transcripts, or certificates. We have seen an example where an applicant who passed an examination altered his test report to show a higher grade. He was caught, as is usually the case, and received an adverse finding and this was noted on his permanent record with the testing organization.

11. Disrupting another candidate or candidates. This can include, for example, pulling a fire alarm during an examination, setting a fire in the building where the examination is being administered, talking to someone else or any type of noisy or disruptive conduct.

12. At any time (i.e., before, during, or after any examination) verbally or physically harming or threatening to harm the test center professional staff, other examinees, test center employees, or NBOME personnel, representatives or agents, including telephone and in-person encounters regarding scheduling, scores, or score reporting. Although we have never heard of actual cases of most of these types of conduct, we understand that sometimes angry applicants have threatened staff members and personnel. Therefore, one should always be courteous and respectful in all dealings with test center and NBOME staff and personnel.

13. “Unprofessional Conduct” which we will discuss in Part 2 of this blog.

14. Other behavior deemed by the NBOME to be unethical or unprofessional. This is, of course, a “catch-all” provision that allows the NBOME to charge an applicant with just about anything that it believes is irregular conduct.

Unprofessional Conduct and Actions that NBOME can Take.

In Parts 2 and 3 of this blog, I will discuss what the NBOME deems to be “unprofessional conduct” as well as the actions it may take and procedures that apply to an applicant facing such allegations.

Stay tuned for part 2 and part 3!

View Our Other Blogs on Our Experience with the USMLE, ECFMG, and NBME, and Hearings on “Irregular Behavior.”

Our law firm is had a great deal of experience representing students and graduates in disputes with and defending charges of “irregular behavior” against the USMLE, ECFMG and the NBME.

To learn more, read two of my prior helpful blogs here titled, “Medical Students, Interns & Residents Beware: A Finding of “Irregular Behavior” Can Ruin Your Medical Career Before it Starts,” and  “USMLE Hearing? Organization, Timing, and Evidence are Crucial.”

Contact a Health Care Attorney Experienced in the Representation of Medical Students, Interns, Residents and Applicants, Fellows and Those Involved in Graduate Medical Education.

The Health Law Firm and its attorneys represent interns, residents, fellows and medical school students in disputes with their medical schools, supervisors, residency programs and in dismissal hearings. We have experience representing such individuals and those in graduate medical education programs in various disputes regarding their academic and clinical performance, allegations of substance abuse, failure to complete integral parts training, alleged false or incomplete statements on applications, allegations of impairment (because of abuse or addiction to drugs or alcohol or because of mental or physical issues), because of discrimination due to race, sex, national origin, sexual orientation and any other matters.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620

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