What to do if You Receive a Medicaid Fraud Control Unit Investigative Subpoena

The Medicaid Fraud Control Unit is charged with investigating and prosecuting health care providers suspected of defrauding the state’s Medicaid program. It is a division of the Florida Office of the Attorney General .When the unit opens a case against a provider, the first step is usually the issuance of an investigative subpoena, requesting specific patient records. The practice tips below were prepared to assist a health care provider in properly responding to and defending against such a subpoena.

1. Immediately contact an attorney knowledgeable in Medicaid fraud and abuse prior to responding to the government’s requests.

The Medicaid Fraud Control Unit does not issue a subpoena without reason. An investigation by the Medicaid Fraud Control Unit is a very serious matter that can lead to both the recoupment of Medicaid reimbursements and criminal charges. It is essential that you immediately retain an attorney experienced in Medicaid fraud and abuse claims when served with such a subpoena. If retained early, an experienced health care attorney can review the requested records and determine what concerns the government may have and how best to defend against them. An experienced attorney can also determine if the subpoena has been properly served and what documents will be most responsive to the government’s requests.

2. The Medicaid Fraud Control Unit can only subpoena and seize the records of Medicaid patients.

The Medicaid Fraud Control Unit has the right to subpoena and review the patient records for Medicaid patients only. The records of a non-Medicaid patient may not be reviewed by the government without the patients’s prior written consent.

3. The government investigator is not on your side.

It is not uncommon for a government investigator to notify you that the subpoena you have been served with is a routine matter and that there is nothing to fear. The investigator may also tell you that your practice is not the subject of the investigation and that retaining counsel is unnecessary. A subpoena issued by the Medicaid Fraud Control Unit is always a very serious matter and should be treated as such. Remember, the investigator’s job is to build a case against you and, in our experience, they will use whatever tactics are at their disposal to do so.

4. DO NOT provide the Medicaid Fraud Control Unit with more documents than have been requested.

It is almost never advisable to provide the Medicaid Fraud Control Unit with more documents than requested in the subpoena. Providing the government investigator with additional information beyond what was requested will only provide the government with more evidence to use against you at a later date.

5. DO NOT provide the Medicaid Fraud Control Unit with your original records.

Unless required by the government, do not provide the Medicaid Fraud Control Unit with your original records. These investigations can often taken years to reach a final resolution and once the original records have been produced it is very difficult to get them back. In most cases, if the government is provided with an organized bates stamped copy of the requested records, they will not require you to produce the originals.

6. If proper and lawful, you must respond to the subpoena.


If the Medicaid Fraud Control Unit properly serves you with a lawful subpoena, you must produce the written records within the time prescribed. If the subpoena is not obeyed, the government will petition the court to compel compliance, and you will likely have to pay the government’s attorney’s fees and costs associated with enforcing the investigative subpoena.


7. Your employees are not required to speak with government investigators unless subpoenaed.


After your records have been produced, it is important to remember that neither you nor your employees are required to speak with government investigators, absent a subpoena. As noted above, it is rarely advisable to volunteer information to the Medicaid Fraud Control Unit, and in most cases, this information will be used to build a case against you.

8. Remain patient after complying with the subpoena.

Finally, it is important to remain patient after you have submitted your records to the government for review. The Medicaid Fraud Control Unit investigates hundreds of cases each year, involving thousands of records, and it is not uncommon for an investigation to go years without a final determination. Legal representation is extremely important at this time, as the communications between the your counsel and the government can make the difference between a civil penalty and criminal charges.

For more information on the Medicaid Fraud Control Unit and Medicaid audits, please visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Supreme Court Rules that Government Regulators Can Sue Over Pay-for-Delay Agreements Between Brand and Generic Drug Manufacturers

George F. Indest III, Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

George F. Indest III, Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled on June 17, 2013, that pay-for-delay agreements between brand name and generic drug manufacturers are subject to anti-trust scrutiny. These pay-for-delay agreements, or reverse payments, are usually a form of settlement between the two manufacturers in patent litigation. The Supreme Court decided that each instance must be considered on a case-by-case basis. This verdict rewrites the rules governing the release of generic drugs. It is likely to increase the number of generic drugs in the marketplace and reduce the price of generic drugs.

To read a previous blog on pay-for-delay agreements, click here.

What is a Pay-for-Delay Agreement?

Pay-for-delay agreements came as the result of the Drug Price Competition and Patent Term Restoration Act of 1984, also known as the Hatch-Waxman Act. The Hatch-Waxman Act gives generic drug manufacturers an incentive to challenge brand name drug patents because the first generic drug manufacturer to received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval to launch a generic copy of a brand name drug can receive a 180-day marketing exclusivity period for the product. The FDA cannot approve any other generic applications for the same drug until the first-to-file generic manufacturer has sold its product for 180 days or has given up its exclusivity period. Click here to read the Hatch-Waxman Act.

Brand name manufacturers often challenge generic drug manufacturers who try to sell their product prior to patent expiration. This results in litigation to determine whether the generic manufacturer is violating the brand name manufacturer’s patents.

Instead of going to court over this, brand name manufacturers often choose to pay a settlement to the generic drug manufacturers for agreeing to delay the launch of its competing product.

Why the Supreme Court Overruled Court of Appeals Decision.

The 5-3 vote overruled the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals decision that said pharmaceutical companies can’t be sued unless the patent litigation is a sham or a generic drug maker agrees to delay introduction of a generic drug into the market even after the patent has expired.

A Med Page Today article lists the Supreme Court’s five reasons why the appellate court made a mistake in giving blanket immunity to pay-for-delay agreements from the decision written by Justice Stephen Breyer:

–  “A reverse payment, where large and unjustified, can bring with it the risk of significant anticompetitive effects.”

–  “One who makes such a payment may be unable to explain and to justify it.”

–  “Such a firm or individual may well possess market power derived from the patent.”

–  “A court, by examining the size of the payment, may well be able to assess its likely anticompetitive effects along with its potential justifications without litigating the validity of the patent.”

–  “Parties may well find ways to settle patent disputes without the use of reverse payments.”

Click here to read the entire Med Page Today article.

Pay-for-Delay Agreements Allegedly Cost Patients Millions of Dollars a Year.

According to Bloomberg, the high court’s decision may discourage brand name and generic pharmaceutical companies from reaching settlements. It’s been found that pay-for-delay agreements can delay a generic drug almost 17 months before it can be put on the market. In the meantime, patients must pay higher prices for the brand name version. This also impacts Medicare and Medicaid programs. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) claims pay-for-delay agreements cost consumers $3.5 billion a year in the form of higher drug prices.

To read the Bloomberg article, click here.

The Case of the FTC v. Solvay Pharmaceuticals.

The Supreme Court case center around AndroGel, a treatment for low testosterone in men, made by Solvay Pharmaceuticals, Inc. The FTC sued Solvay and three generic drug companies. According to Bloomberg, the FTC said that a payment made by Solvay, the holder of a patent on AndroGel, to the generic drug manufacturers represented an unlawful restraint of trade because it was intended to keep cheaper, generic versions of AndroGel off the market until 2020.

FTC Enthusiastic About the Decision.

In a statement, the FTC Chairwoman said the Supreme Court’s decision is a “significant victory for American consumers, American taxpayers and free market.” She also stated, “The court made it clear that pay-for-delay agreements are subject to antitrust scrutiny.”

Click here to read the full statement from the FTC.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Pharmacies and Pharmacists.

The Health Law Firm represents pharmacists and pharmacies in investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, inspections and audits. The firm’s attorneys include those who are board certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law as well as licensed health professionals who are also attorneys.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

What do you think of the Supreme Court’s ruling? Do you agree or disagree? What effect do you think it will have on the pharmaceutical industry? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Stohn, Greg. “Drugmakers Opened to ‘Pay for Delay’ Suits by High Court.” Bloomberg. (June 17, 2013). From: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-06-17/drugmakers-opened-to-pay-for-delay-suits-by-high-court.html

Frieden, Joyce. “Supreme Court Split on Pharma ‘Pay for Delay’ Deals.” Med Page Today. (June 17, 2013). From: http://bit.ly/18SfhKb

Kaplan, Peter. “Statement of FTC Chairwoman Edith Ramirez of the U.S. Supreme Court’s Decision in FTC v. Actavis, Inc.” (June 17,2 013). From: http://www.ftc.gov/opa/2013/06/actavis.shtm

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

A New Year Means New Audits and Site Visits for Assisted Living Facilities – Protect Yourself Now

00011_RT8By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

For Assisted Living Facilities (ALFs) in Florida, it’s time to do a little brushing up on your compliance material.

Beginning in January 2015, the Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA), Office of Inspector General (OIG), Bureau of Medicaid Program Integrity (MPI), will conduct site visits to determine compliance with the Florida Medicaid Provider General Handbook and the Assistive Care Services Coverage and Limitations Handbook. This is just one of several initiatives aimed at ALFs to curtail fraud, waste, and abuse in the Florida Medicaid program.

Be Prepared.

The goal of a site visit is to determine if providers are rendering and documenting required services; to determine if assistive care services are being rendered by qualified and properly trained staff; to identify quality of care/environmental issues; and, to document and report ALF providers’ deficiencies to any managed care organizations with which the ALF is contracted.

According to the Florida Assisted Living Association (FALA), the majority of MPI sanctions concerning these fines are associated with the failure to have the following completed forms on file for each resident:

1. AHCA Form 1823 – The Health Assessment
2. AHCA Form 035 – The Certification of Medical Necessity
3. AHCA Form 036 – Medicaid Service Plan

Knowing is Half the Battle.

This announcement shows that the government will continue rigorous and thorough enforcement efforts this year. ALFs should consider this a fair warning to get supporting documentation in order. If you’re worried your ALF may not be in compliance, we suggest getting a compliance assessment. If your ALF is being audited we always suggest contacting an experienced health law attorney immediately. For general tips on how to respond to a Medicaid audit, click here for a previous blog.

Comments?

Did you know about these anti-fraud initiatives? Do you feel like your ALF is prepared for a site visit? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Assisted Living Facilities.

The Health Law Firm and its attorneys represent assisted living facilities (ALFs) and ALF employees in a number of different matters including incorporation, preparing contracts, defending the facility against malpractice claims, licensing and regulatory matters, administrative hearings, and routine legal advice.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

 

The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.

Copyright © 1999-2015 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

$24 Million Medicaid Fraud Scheme Alleged by Connecticut Attorney General

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Connecticut’s Attorney General, George Jepsen, alleges that 28 individuals, dental practices and corporations were involved in a $24 million Medicaid fraud scheme. He filed a civil action  on May 31, 2012. It is the first case the state has initiated under the Connecticut False Claims Act. The Connecticut False Claims Act gives the state the ability to seek compensation for taxpayers from those who submit false claims for reimbursements they are not eligible to receive. To view the Connecticut False Claims Act, click here.

The complaint seeks restitution, treble damages and civil penalties as well as a permanent injunction against the unlawful acts and practices alleged in the complaint. To view the complaint, click here.

Accused Individual Allegedly Found Ways to Bill Medicaid for Services, Despite Being Excluded from Medicare and Medicaid Programs.

According to the complaint, one of the individuals involved in the alleged fraud scheme was previously convicted of a felony in another state for submitting false health care claims. He was then permanently excluded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) from participation in Medicare and Medicaid, as a result of his conviction. Any entity with which he serves as an employee, administrator, operator or in any other capacity, were also excluded from state healthcare programs.

The state alleges that, despite the exclusion, he established a number of dental practices in Connecticut that were operated by practicing dentists who billed Medicaid for services.

Allegedly, the excluded individual was actively involved in managing the practices and received millions of dollars in Medicaid reimbursements. The dental providers allegedly knew of the exclusion and did not disclose it on enrollment and re-enrollment forms for the Connecticut Medical Assistance Program.

Florida Has Similar False Claims Act.

Florida has a Medicaid False Claims Act similar to the one that Connecticut has. Florida’s Medicaid False Claims Act can be found here. However, in Florida, a separate provision of the state’s Medicaid law provides an award to a whistle-blower of up to 25% of any recovery. This is in Section 409.9203, Florida Statutes. In addition, Florida has a law that allows civil recovery for criminal acts such as Medicaid fraud, which is sometimes used by the Florida Attorney General and private individuals to recover money lost as a result of certain criminal conduct. For the Florida Civil Remedies for Criminal Actions law, click here.

As a general rule state false claims acts are modeled after the federal False Claims Act used to pursue Medicare fraud. For the federal Medicare Fraud False Claims Act, 31 U.S.C. § 3729, click here.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Handling Medicaid and Medicare Fraud Cases.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent physicians, dentists, nurses, medical groups, clinics, pharmacies, durable medical equipment (DME) suppliers, home health agencies, nursing homes and other healthcare providers in Medicaid and Medicare investigations, audits, hearings and recovery actions. In addition The Health Law Firm represents health providers in Medicare exclusion actions and in being reinstated to the Medicare Program or being removed from the exclusion list.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources:

Rees, Nick. “Jepsen alleges $24M Medicaid fraud.” Legal Newsline. (June 4, 2012). From: http://www.legalnewsline.com/news/contentview.asp?c=236342

About the Author:  George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

Medicaid Fraud Control Unit Arrests Three Florida Women for Allegedly Bilking Medicaid Out of $27,000

Lance Leider headshotBy Lance Leider, J.D., The Health Law Firm

Three Central Florida women were arrested by the Attorney General’s (AG) Medicaid Fraud Control Unit (MFCU) on July 18, 2013, for allegedly defrauding Medicaid out of $27,000. According to the AG, the owner and two managers of Destiny TCM Corporation are accused of billing Medicaid for services never rendered and also bribing people in order to obtain their Medicaid recipient numbers.

To read the press release from the AG’s office, click here.

Violated Medicaid Fraud Kickback Statute.

An article in the Orlando Sentinel states that the Destiny TCM Corporation was supposed to provide targeted case-management services and link Medicaid recipients with mental health service providers. Allegedly, the business was billing for services never rendered to Medicaid recipients, which included claims for infants. The owner of Destiny TCM Corporation is also accused of paying kickbacks to people in order to access Medicaid numbers for billing, according to the Orlando Sentinel. This act violates the Medicaid fraud kickback statute, Section 409.920(2)(a)(5), Florida Statutes.

The three alleged Medicaid abusers are each charged with one count of Medicaid provider fraud. The owner was also charged for allegedly paying kickbacks for Medicaid numbers. If convicted, they all face prison time and hefty fines, according to the Orlando Sentinel.

Click here to read the entire article from the Orlando Sentinel.

Tips for Responding to a Medicaid Fraud Control Unit Investigative Subpoena.

The MFCU is in charge of investigating and prosecuting health care providers suspected of defrauding the state’s Medicaid program.  When the unit opens a case against a provider, the first step is usually the issuance of an investigative subpoena, requesting specific patient records. It is important to remember that the MFCU would not be involved unless criminal fraud was suspected. This is not a routine audit. Click here to read practice tips on how to properly respond to an MFCU subpoena.

Defend Yourself from Fraud Charges.

We have been consulted by many individuals similar to the subjects of this story, both before and after criminal convictions for fraud or related offenses. In many instances, we are convinced that the person is actually not guilty of fraud. However, in many cases those subject to Medicaid or Medicare fraud audits and investigations refuse to acknowledge the seriousness of the matter or they decide not to spend the money required for a top quality attorney to defend them.

If you are accused of Medicare or Medicaid fraud, realize that you are in the fight of your life. Your liberty, life and profession are at stake. You need to sell everything you own, borrow everything you can and hire the absolute best criminal defense attorney available who has experience in defending such cases to represent you.

If you win and are acquitted, at least you still have a professional license and can start over. However, if you lose, you will most probably be in prison for years. You will lose your license. You will be excluded from Medicare. You will be a convicted felon. You will have nothing and will have no way of starting over successfully.

Do not delude yourself. This is extremely serious. Be prepared to give up whatever you have if you can avoid a conviction.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Handling Medicaid Audits, Investigations and other Legal Proceedings.

Medicaid fraud is a serious crime and is vigorously investigated by the state MFCU, the Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA), the Zone Program Integrity Contractors (ZPICs), the FBI, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). Often other state and federal agencies, including the U.S. Postal Service (USPS), and other law enforcement agencies participate. Don’t wait until it’s too late. If you are concerned of any possible violations and would like a confidential consultation, contact a qualified health attorney familiar with medical billing and audits today. Often Medicaid fraud criminal charges arise out of routine Medicaid audits, probe audits, or patient complaints.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent case managers, nurses, physicians, dentists, orthodontists, medical groups, clinics, pharmacies, assisted living facilities (AFLs), home health agencies, nursing homes, group homes, medical directors, nursing directors and other healthcare providers in Medicaid and Medicare investigations, audits and recovery actions.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

Have you noticed an increase in activity by the Medicaid Fraud Control Unit (MFCU)? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Pavuk, Amy. “Three Women Charged in $27,000 Medicaid-Fraud Scheme, Officials Say.” Orlando Sentinel. (July 18, 2013). From: http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/local/breakingnews/os-medicaid-fraud-arrests-20130718,0,7659716.story

Meale, Jenn. “Attorney General Bondi’s Medicaid Fraud Control Unit Arrests Three People for $27,000 of Medicaid Fraud.” Florida Office of the Attorney General. (July 18, 2013). From: http://www.myfloridalegal.com/newsrel.nsf/newsreleases/D234C9D525CAAC1E85257BAC005D8AF2

About the Author: Lance O. Leider is an attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Avenue, Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Federal Health Officials Propose Medicare Paying Doctors to Discuss End-of-Life Issues

4 Indest-2009-3By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released a new plan for doctors to discuss end-of-life issues with their patients. The plan is part of the CMS annual Medicare physician payment rule. This comes six years after the original controversy when President Obama first announced his health care legislation.

Doctors Will Be Paid for Discussing Treatment Options with Elderly Patients.

In what can only be described as welcomed and needed relief, the rule would reimburse doctors for discussing living wills and end-of-life medical treatment options with older patients. The medical discussions include long-term treatment options, like heart transplants. It also handles advance care planning, including a patient who desires treatment for a condition that affects his or her decision-making. These are conversations already taking place, but physicians are not currently paid for them.

The Pressure is on Medicare.

Medicare reimbursement is extremely important for elderly and disabled persons. As the second-largest insurer, many private insurers also follow the same rules Medicare adopts. Their place in the end-of-life care has long been debated. Whether or not health care professionals should be reimbursed for hospice and end-of-life treatment talks has been the center of debate. Physician groups and patient advocates have been pushing the health program to pay doctors for these consultations.

Many advocacy groups, including the American Medical Association (AMA), support the proposal. The AMA believes it’s the patient’s choice to plan advance-care decisions. Research has shown that there are great benefits to elders in advance-care planning and having their end-of-life wishes known to others. Receiving timely knowledge from physicians and health professionals can result in better decisions and ease of mind.

Rules Previously Criticized as “Death Panels” by Ignoramuses.

Sarah Palin, the towering mountain of medical knowledge and intellectual analysis, who dragged down John McCain into defeat during the elections of 2008, previously denounced similar payment provisions in the past. Sparking a great deal of unnecessary controversy, Palin claimed the health care reform legislation would create “death panels.” As a result of these and other similar accusations, the provision was removed from the final Affordable Care Act legislation. This deprived elders of useful knowledge and deprived health care providers of payment for their services. To read more about the “death panel” controversy, click here.

Comments?

What do you think of end-of-life discussions? Do you think they should be in place? Should physicians be reimbursed?  Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Grier, Peter. “ ‘Death Panel’ Controversy Very Much Alive.” The Christian Science Monitor. (Aug. 21, 2009). From: http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Politics/2009/0821/death-panel-controversy-remains-very-much-alive

Sun, Lena H. “Medicare Proposes to Pay Doctors to Have End-of-Life Care Discussions.” The Washington Post. (July 8, 2015). From:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/medicare-proposes-to-pay-doctors-to-have-end-of-life-care-discussions/2015/07/08/1d7bb436-25a7-11e5-aae2-6c4f59b050aa_story.html

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.


About the author:
George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

KeyWords: Medicare, federal health, health law, health law attorney, health law lawyer, end-of-life issues, The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), CMS, Medicaid, healthcare, health care, health care attorney, health care lawyer, physicians, physician attorney, health care legislation, Affordable Care Act, ACA, medicine, the health law firm, death panel, death panel controversy, Medicare investigations, Medicaid investigations, elderly healthcare, senior health care, American Medical Association

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2015 The Health Law firm. All rights reserved.

Walgreens Reaches Settlement in False Claims Act Case

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Walgreens has reached a $7.9 million settlement with the United States and participating states that resolves allegations that Walgreens violated the False Claims Act. The DOJ announced the settlement on April 20, 2012. To view the DOJ’s press release concerning the settlement with Walgreens, click here. To view the False Claims Act, click here.

Walgreens Allegedly Offered Illegal Inducements to Medicare and Medicaid Beneficiaries.

The settlement was reached after Walgreens was accused of offering illegal inducements to beneficiaries of government health programs (Medicare, Medicaid, the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program (FEHBP), and TRICARE ). Walgreens allegedly offered gift cards to government health program beneficiaries when they transferred a prescription from another pharmacy to Walgreens. The government maintains that such inducements are a violation of state and federal laws.

Walgreens Pays Back Individual State Medicaid Programs.

Since the initial settlement was announced by the DOJ, Walgreens has begun to pay back individual state Medicaid programs that were impacted by the alleged inducements. State and federal laws prohibit such inducements to buy services and goods provided under Medicaid. Walgreens is now paying the states for prescription claims it submitted for reimbursement to Medicaid that were a result of the alleged inducements. Some of the states involved include California, Indiana, Michigan, and Missouri.

Whistleblowers Initiated Government Investigation of Walgreens’ Gift Card Inducements.

The allegations were brought to the government by two whistleblowers. Two separate whistleblower lawsuits were filed under the qui tam, or whistleblower, provisions of the False Claims Act and state False Claims Act statutes. The whistleblowers will receive $1,277,172 from the United States for their role in filing the qui tam actions.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced with False Act Claims Cases.

The Health Law Firm represents physicians, medical practices, pharmacists, pharmacies, and other health provider in investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, inspections and audits involving government health programs (Medicare, Medicaid, TRICARE). The Health Law Firm also represents health providers in False Claims Act cases.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources Include:

Cohen, Bryan. “Whistleblower Lawsuits Against Walgreens Settled.” LegalNewsline. (June 12, 2012). From: http://www.legalnewsline.com/news/236427-whistleblower-lawsuits-against-walgreens-settled

Department of Justice, Office of Public Affairs. “Walgreens Pharmacy Chain Pays $7.9 Million to Resolve False Prescription Billing Case.” Department of Justice. (April 20, 2012). Press Release. From: http://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/2012/April/12-civ-505.html

About the Author:  George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

CMS Fights Medicare Fraud With Ban on New Home Health Agencies and Ambulance Suppliers in Three Cities

LOL Blog Label 2

By Lance O. Leider, J.D., The Health Law Firm and George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced it will temporarily ban new home health providers and ambulance suppliers from enrolling in Medicare, Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) in three fraud “hot spots.” According to CMS, the six-month moratorium begins July 30, 2013. It applies to newly enrolling home health agencies (HHAs) in Miami, Florida, and Chicago, Illinois. It also applies to newly enrolling ambulance suppliers in Houston, Texas. Existing providers and suppliers can continue to deliver and bill for services. The goal of the ban is to fight healthcare fraud.

Click here to read the press release from CMS.

Authority to impose a moratorium was included in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA). According to a summary of the anti-fraud provisions in the Affordable Care Act, the Act allows CMS to prohibit new providers from joining the program where necessary to prevent or fight fraud, waste or abuse in certain geographic areas or for certain categories of services. This is the first time CMS is exercising its authority.

Why Moratorium Was Imposed in These Areas.

According to CMS, the decision to impose the moratorium was based on a number of factors, including a disproportional number of providers and suppliers relative to beneficiaries, a quick increase in enrollment applications from providers and suppliers, and extremely high utilization in these areas.

Miami Area a Hot Bed for Healthcare Fraud and Abuse.

The Miami area has stood out as one of the nation’s hubs of Medicare fraud, according to CMS. For example, in May 2013, a Miami patient recruiter for an HHA was sentenced to 37 months in prison for participating in a $20 million Medicare fraud scheme. Click here to read a previous blog. In that same month, workers from a Miami-area HHA were accused of bribing Medicare beneficiaries for their Medicare information, which was used to bill for home health services that were never rendered or not medically necessary. To read more, click here.

According to the Miami Herald, with a large number of elderly Medicare beneficiaries living in Miami, it’s not a surprise that healthcare fraud is so prevalent. South Florida allegedly accounts for one-third (1/3) of all healthcare fraud prosecutions in the nation. Click here to read the entire Miami Herald article.

The Affordable Care Act Offers the Government New Tools to Fight Healthcare Fraud.

In 2011 and 2012, the government reported recovery of $14.9 billion in healthcare fraud judgments, settlements and administrative impositions, according to CMS. In addition, CMS has revoked 14,663 providers and suppliers’ ability to bill the Medicare Program since 2011. The Affordable Care Act seeks to improve anti-fraud and abuse measures by focusing on prevention rather than the traditional “pay-and-chase” model of catching crooks after they have committed fraud. Click here to read a blog on the Affordable Care Act’s other fraud fighting tools.

What This Means for Health Care Professionals and Providers.

By knowing the government is beefing up measures to fight healthcare fraud, providers can attempt to avoid practices that are likely to lead to Zone Program Integrity Contractor (ZPIC) or Recovery Audit Contractor (RAC) audits. Additionally, a provider can be prepared for potential audits by increasing its documentation and compliance efforts.

Don’t Wait Until It’s Too Late; Consult with a Health Law Attorney Experienced in Medicare and Medicaid Issues Now.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm represent healthcare providers in Medicare audits, ZPIC audits and RAC audits throughout Florida and across the U.S. They also represent physicians, medical groups, nursing homes, home health agencies, pharmacies, hospitals and other healthcare providers and institutions in Medicare and Medicaid investigations, audits, recovery actions and termination from the Medicare or Medicaid Program.
For more information please visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com or call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001.

Comments?

What do you think of CMS’ decision to invoke the moratorium? Do you think this should have been done sooner? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. “CMS Imposes First Affordable Care Act Enrollment Moratoria to Combat Fraud.” CMS.gov. (July 26, 2013). From: http://www.cms.gov/Newsroom/MediaReleaseDatabase/Press-Releases/2013-Press-Releases-Items/2013-07-26.html

Chang, Daniel. “Feds Ban New Home Healthcare Agencies in Miami to Fight Medicare Fraud.” Miami Herald. (July 26, 2013). From: http://www.miamiherald.com/2013/07/26/3524612/feds-ban-new-home-healthcare-agencies.html

Beasley, Deena. “U.S. Bans New Home Health, Ambulance Providers in Three Regions.” Miami Herald. (July 26, 2013). From: http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/07/26/us-medicare-moratoria-idUSBRE96P14P20130726

About the Authors: Lance O. Leider is an attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Avenue, Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

 

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Apopka Woman to Serve 18-Month Prison Sentence After $47K Medicaid Scam

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

IndestAn Apopka businesswoman was recently sentenced to 18 months in prison after she was found guilty of a Medicaid scam. According to the Florida Attorney General’s Office, Shanqual Marshall-Gunn was arrested in September on suspicion of submitting more than $47,000 in fraudulent Medicaid claims.

Company Provided Targeted Case Management Services (TCMs).

Marshall-Gunn owned Second Chances TCM, Inc. TCMs are intended to provide Medicaid recipients who have mental-health disorders with connections to resources in their community, and to assist them in leading a more normal life. Prosecutors said Marshall-Gunn gave employees and clients kickbacks when they submitted referrals to her company.

Three of her employees were also arrested in September 2014 for billing Medicaid for targeted case management services that were fraudulent or not authorized.

Marshall-Gunn Entered a No Contest Plea.

Media reported that court records show Marshall-Gunn entered a no contest (or “nolo contendere”) plea and was found guilty of Medicare fraud, a second-degree felony. Circuit Court Judge Jenifer Davis sentenced Marshall-Gunn on July 2. Davis also ordered Marshall-Gunn to serve five years of probation.

In addition, she cannot work for any Medicaid provider and must pay more than $47,000 in restitution.

The Investigation Was Conducted by the Medicaid Fraud Control Unit.

The investigation was conducted by Attorney General Pam Bondi’s Medicaid Fraud Control Unit (MFCU). And it was prosecuted by the Attorney General’s Office of Statewide Prosecution.

Bondi’s MFCU investigates and prosecutes providers that intentionally defraud Florida’s Medicaid program. According to Bondi’s MFCU press release in this case: “From January 2011 to August 2014, Attorney General Bondi’s MFCU has obtained more than $460 million in settlements and judgments.”

To read the press release, click here.

To read more about the MFCU, click here.

Comments?

Have you ever been a victim or suspect of Medicaid fraud? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Handling Medicaid Audits, Investigations and other Legal Proceedings.

Medicaid fraud is a serious crime and is vigorously investigated by the state MFCU, the Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA), the Zone Program Integrity Contractors (ZPICs), the FBI, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). Often other state and federal agencies, including the U.S. Postal Service (USPS), and other law enforcement agencies participate. Don’t wait until it’s too late. If you are concerned of any possible violations and would like a confidential consultation, contact a qualified health attorney familiar with medical billing and audits today. Often Medicaid fraud criminal charges arise out of routine Medicaid audits, probe audits, or patient complaints.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent physicians, dentists, orthodontists, medical groups, clinics, pharmacies, assisted living facilities (ALFs), home health care agencies, nursing homes, group homes and other healthcare providers in Medicaid and Medicare investigations, audits and recovery actions.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources:

Attorney General’s Press Office. “Four Central Florida Residents Arrested for Medicaid Fraud.” (Sept. 5, 2014). WCTV. From: http://www.wctv.tv/home/headlines/Four-Central-Florida-Residents-Arrested-for-Medicaid-Fraud-274154191.html

Connolly, Kevin P. “Apopka woman sentenced to prison for 18 months after Medicaid scam.” Orlando Sentinel. Print.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

KeyWords: Medicaid, Medicaid fraud, defense attorney, Medicaid investigation, defense lawyer, defense counsel, Medicaid claims, fraudulent claims, home health care, criminal defense, health law criminal defense, health law criminal representation, criminal representation, Medicaid Fraud Control Unit, MFCU, targeted case management provider, TCM, Florida’s Medicaid program, overbill Medicaid, Medicaid scam, Medicaid fraud defense attorney, Medicaid fraud defense lawyer, Medicare, Medicare fraud, Medicare Investigation, overbill Medicare, health care fraud, Florida Attorney General, The Health Law Firm

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2015 The Health Law firm. All rights reserved.

WellCare Health Plans Reaches Settlement in False Claims Act Case

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

WellCare Health Plans Inc.(WellCare) has reached a $137.5 million settlement with the federal government and nine states. The settlement resolves four lawsuits alleging violations of the False Claims Act.

WellCare is based in Tampa, Florida. The company provides managed health care services for approximately 2.6 million Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries across the United States.

Lawsuits Allege WellCare Submitted False Claims to Medicare, Medicaid Programs.

The lawsuits allege that WellCare submitted false claims to Medicare and Medicaid programs. WellCare allegedly falsely inflated the amount it claimed to be spending on medical care. Allegedly, this was done in order to avoid returning money to Medicaid and other programs in various states, including the Florida Medicaid program and Florida Healthy Kids program. WellCare also allegedly knowingly retained overpayments it had received from Florida Medicaid for infant care. Furthermore, WellCare allegedly falsified data that misrepresented the medical conditions of patients and the treatments they received.

WellCare to Pay the United States and Nine Individual States in Settlement.

WellCare’s settlement requires the company to pay the United States and nine individual states $137.5 million. The nine states are Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, New York, and Ohio. The settlement also requires WellCare to pay an additional $35 million if the company is sold or experiences a change in control within three years of the agreement.

Whistleblowers Share in Settlement.

The four lawsuits against WellCare were filed by whistleblowers under the qui tam provisions of the False Claims Act. The qui tam provisions allow individuals to file lawsuits on behalf of the United States and share in any recovery.

The whistleblower whose qui tam complaint initiated the government’s investigation will receive approximately $20.75 million. The other whistleblowers will share approximately $4.66 million and will also be entitled to receive an additional share of any contingency payment.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in False Claims Act Cases.

The Health Law Firm represents physicians, medical practices, pharmacists, pharmacies, and other health provider in investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, inspections and audits involving government health programs (Medicare, Medicaid, TRICARE). The Health Law Firm also represents health providers in False Claims Act cases.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources Include:

Kutscher, Beth. “WellCare Agrees to Pay Over $137.5 Million in Settlement.” Modern Healthcare. (Apr. 3, 2012). From: http://www.modernhealthcare.com/article/20120403/NEWS/304039975#ixzz1yAklA7rutrk=tynt

U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Public Affairs. “Florida-Based WellCcare Health Plans Agrees to Pay $137.5 Million to Resolve False Claims Act Allegations.” U.S. Department of Justice. (Apr. 3, 2012). From: http://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/2012/April/12-civ-425.html

Voreacos, David. “WellCare to Pay $137.5 Million to Settle False Claims Case.” Bloomberg News. (Apr. 3, 2012). From: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-04-03/wellcare-to-pay-137-5-million-to-settle-false-claims-case-1-.html

About the Author:  George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

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