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How Criminal Charges Can Affect Your Professional Medical License

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Every health care provider knows that their license to practice can be disciplined for misconduct on the job. However, many are surprised to learn that they can also be disciplined for actions including criminal charges that occur outside their professional lives.  A criminal conviction for a felony or misdemeanor that is not directly related to their profession can still result in discipline.

Criminal Charges Do Impact Professional Licenses.

Licensing authorities are charged with protecting the general public, not the individuals they regulate. Most health care practitioner practice acts include criminal convictions as one of the grounds for the denial or discipline of a professional license. Some of those acts (for example, Florida) allow the disciplinary authority to impose discipline upon a conviction even when adjudication is withheld.

These authorities can and do impose discipline based upon the facts underlying a conviction, even when the conviction itself is not directly related to the practice of a profession.  For example, a conviction for driving under the influence (DUI) or reckless driving can raise the question of whether the practitioner could be impaired or reckless while providing patient care.  The licensing authority will most likely investigate these matters and the facts underlying the offense to determine if the practitioner poses a threat to the public.

Therefore, if you have been arrested for DUI, disorderly conduct, assault, or any other misdemeanor, you can anticipate that the state, the Department of Health (DOH) or the Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs will start an investigation. It is imperative that you retain an attorney who can immediately defend your freedom during your criminal case and also protect your livelihood during licensing proceedings.


Conviction of Felony or Misdemeanor Charges May Lead to Suspension of Professional License.

In the event of a conviction, in many cases, this may trigger a report to the state licensing board.  In Florida, for example, a physician or other licensed health professional who is required to have a practitioner profile must update that profile with the information about the conviction within 15 days.  In Florida, a physician or other licensed health professional must also notify his or her licensing board for the Department of Health (when there is no board), in writing, within 30 days.

If you are facing felony or misdemeanor charges, it is imperative that you seek the advice and experience of an attorney who can navigate the criminal and administrative courts and get you the best possible result to protect your freedom and livelihood. Remember, your profession is often your only means of support.

Practitioners who have been arrested generally want their criminal cases resolved as quickly and quietly as possible.  Unfortunately, they may inadvertently accept a plea arrangement that results in severe discipline or revocation of their license.  All health care providers and their criminal attorneys should consider the consequences to the practitioner’s license before accepting a plea arrangement and should consult with an experienced health law attorney. Click here to read one of our prior blogs for more information on this.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Handling Licensure Matter and Disciplinary Matters.

If you have been arrested, it is strongly recommended that you retain an experienced health care attorney who can advise you and your criminal counsel as to the effects a potential outcome could have on your license.

The Health Law Firm routinely represents physicians, pharmacists, nurses, and other healthcare practitioners in licensure matters.  We frequently consult with criminal defense attorneys regarding defense strategies tailored to minimizing criminal sanctions while at the same time preserving the practitioner’s license.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

KeyWords: Health care license defense representation, professional licensure defense, representation for professional license suspension, reporting physician arrests and convictions, health care licensure defense attorney, medical license defense attorney, physician defense lawyer, representation for physician criminal charges, representation for nurse criminal charges, representation for dentist criminal charges, Department of Health (DOH) conviction, misdemeanor offenses physicians, legal representation for Supersedeas Relief, Department of Health (DOH) investigation, DOH representation, DOH attorney, DOH investigation representation, DOH defense lawyer, representation for license suspension, license revocation attorney, representation for license revocation, health care license defense attorney, representation for health care license, representation for health care professionals, representation for administrative hearings, representation for administrative appeals, The Health Law Firm reviews, reviews of The Health Law Firm attorneys, Florida health law defense attorney

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999. Copyright © 2018 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Massage Therapists: Please DON’T Talk to the DOH Investigator Before Your Attorney!

Headshot of The Health Law Firm's attorney George F. Indest IIIBy George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Massage therapists, I beg you: please do not talk to a Department of Health (DOH) investigator until you have talked to a health lawyer who is experienced with DOH investigations and board licensing complaints. Do not answer or respond to even the most basic questions about where you work now, what your address is or if you know the patient.

Admitting to the Simplest Fact May Harm Your Career.

We are routinely consulted by massage therapists and other healthcare providers for representation for DOH investigations. Unfortunately, often times it is after they have already discussed the case and after it is too late to undo the damage they have caused to themselves. Often they do not understand the seriousness of the matter or the possible consequences until it’s too late. Admitting to even the most basic facts causes damage to any possible defense.

Administrative Licensure Investigations Such as These are Considered “Quasi-Criminal.”

The vast majority of massage therapists and even most attorneys do not realize that DOH investigations concerning complaints against a massage therapist’s license are considered to be “penal” or “quasi-criminal” proceedings. This means the same laws and constitutional rights apply to them as apply to criminal investigations. However, since they are also administrative proceedings and not strictly criminal proceedings, investigators do not need to advise you of your Miranda rights or tell you that you have the right to remain silent, the right to an attorney, etc.

In any criminal investigation, a good criminal defense attorney would always tell you “Do not talk to the investigator” and “Tell the investigator you have a lawyer.”

Investigators’ Techniques Include Trying to Persuade You to Not Consult a Lawyer.

DOH investigators, police investigators, FBI investigators, and other law enforcement officers, are well trained in investigative techniques and how to get information out of suspects. Often the approach used is to catch you by surprise before you even know there is an investigation and the investigation is of you. Another technique used is to lull you into a false sense of security that the investigation is about someone or something else and not you. Another investigative technique is to convince you that you need to “Tell your side of the story” so that the investigation is accurate. Yet another is that “Things will go much better for you if you cooperate.” None of these things are true.

However, if it is truly in your best interest to cooperate or to make a statement after you consult with your attorney, your legal counsel will surely advise you to do this. The investigator should not mind waiting until you consult your attorney. However, many will go to extremes to convince you that you don’t need an attorney and shouldn’t get an attorney.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in the Representation of Massage Therapists.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm provide legal representation to massage therapists in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, licensing matters and other types of investigations of health professionals and providers. We have represented a number of massage therapists who have had summary actions initiated against their massage therapy licenses by the Department of Health (DOH).

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

Disclaimer: Please note that this article represents our opinions based on our many years of practice and experience in this area of health law. You may have a different opinion; you are welcome to it. This one is mine.

Note: This article is for informational purposes only; it is not legal advice.

Keywords: Massage therapy representation, representation for massage therapy, massage therapy defense, massage therapy attorney, massage therapy lawyer, representation for massage therapy investigations, massage therapy licensing investigations, representation for DOH investigations, DOH lawyer, DOH attorney, DOH defense lawyer, DOH investigation representation, representation for DOH investigations, investigation of massage therapist, Florida massage laws, board licensing complaints, representation for board licencing complaints, board licencing defense lawyer, massage therapy licensure defense,  representation for administrative complaint, administrative licensure investigation attorney, administrative hearing representation, Florida health law attorney, health care attorney, The Health Law Firm reviews

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of and a registered service mark of The Health Law Firm, P.A., a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 2019 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Florida Woman Accused of Operating Illegal Dental Practice Out of Her Garage

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

On November 16, 2018, a Florida woman was accused of practicing as an unlicensed dentist, operating out of her home garage. After receiving an anonymous tip, Palm Beach County Sheriff’s deputies arrested Alexandra Gallego after a month-long investigation into the illegal practice.

She is facing charges of Practicing Dentistry without a License, and Unlawful Use and Control of Dental Equipment.

Practicing Without a License.

In addition to running an illegal practice, Gallego is accused of offering discounted rates to patients who paid in cash, couldn’t afford insurance or did not have the proper documents to legally be in the United States. When investigators searched the home, they found a makeshift dental office, including X-rays, medications and payment receipts located in the garage.

She told authorities she would see about 160 patients a month and made about $20,000 from those appointments. She funneled the money through a cleaning company that she legally owned so that she would be paying taxes on the income. She admitted to authorities that she knew she was legally not allowed to practice dentistry in Florida without a license.

Practicing Without a License Is a Crime.

Practicing medicine without a license is a crime! Additionally, so is helping someone practice medicine without a license. As a practitioner, you may be asked to supervise or join a practice. Remember, your license may be at stake with any wrongdoing by your subordinates. Before you join a practice or agree to supervise others, check first with the DOH that the other providers are legitimate. You can check current medical and dentistry licenses in the state of Florida here.

Remember, a license to practice medicine in Venezuela, Cuba, or anywhere else, is just that: a license to practice in that country. It does not allow a person to practice medicine in the United States.

Click here to read one of my prior blogs on a similar case of a Floridian posing as a doctor.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Health Care Providers Licensure and Regulatory Matters and in DOH Cases.

The Health Law Firm represents dentists, pharmacists, pharmacies, physicians, nurses, and other health providers in investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, inspections and audits involving the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), Department of Health (DOH), and other law enforcement agencies.

If you are aware of an investigation of you or your practice, or if you have been contacted by the DEA or DOH, contact an experienced health law attorney immediately.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources:

Detman, Gary. “Woman practiced dentistry out of garage, deputies say.” CBS 12News. (November 16, 2018). Web.

“Royal Palm Beach woman charged with practicing dental hygiene without license.” WPTV. (November 16, 2018). Web.

Hitchcock, Olivia. “Royal Palm woman accused of running illegal dental practice, making about $20K a month.” The Palm Beach Post. (November 16, 2018). Web.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

KeyWords: licensure defense attorney, representation for professional license, representation for professional licensure matters, DOH attorney, representation for DOH investigations, representation for board representation, representation for dentists, dentist lawyer, representation for dentistry matters, dentist defense lawyer, legal representation for health care professionals, legal representation for licensed health care professionals, licensed health care defense attorney, health law defense attorney, Florida health law attorney, health care fraud defense attorney, legal representation for health care fraud, legal representation for health care fraud investigations, health care fraud investigation representation, legal representation for U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) investigations, DOJ investigation representation, review of The Health Law Firm attorneys, The Health Law Firm reviews

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of and a registered service mark of The Health Law Firm, P.A., a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 2018 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Recall Alert: FDA Warns Steroid Injections Compounded by Tennessee Pharmacy May Be Contaminated

6 Indest-2008-3By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) sent out a warning to health care professionals that steroid injections compounded by Main Street Family Pharmacy, LLC, in Tennessee, may be contaminated. The announcement came on May 24, 2013. So far, seven patients have allegedly suffered adverse reactions from the medications. The FDA says it is working with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Tennessee Board of Pharmacy to investigate. The steroid injections were allegedly sent to 13 states, including Florida.

To read the press release from the FDA, click here.

Steroid Injections Recalled.

According to an article in the Associated Press, officials have not yet confirmed the products are contaminated. The FDA is treating all sterile products from Main Street Family Pharmacy as if they were contaminated as a precaution. The pharmacy has agreed to recall all of its sterile products. Click here to read the Associated Press article.

The injections in question allegedly contain the same drug at the center of the October 2012, deadly fungal meningitis outbreak. More than 55 people, including five in Florida were killed and 740 others were sickened after receiving contaminated injections from a Massachusetts compounding pharmacy. I previously blogged about that outbreak. To read more, click here.

Patients in North Carolina and Illinois Allegedly Reacted to Injections.

Federal authorities have allegedly identified seven cases of patients who have suffered complications after being injected with the potentially contaminated medications. There are five cases in Illinois and two cases in North Carolina. The Illinois patients supposedly have skin infections and one patient in North Carolina allegedly suffered from a fungal infection.

Florida Department of Health Working to Contain Allegedly Tainted Injections Statewide.

According to the Florida Department of Health (DOH), at least three Florida facilities received the drugs under investigation. Two of the facilities are in Melbourne, Florida, and one is in Chipley, Florida. The Florida DOH says it is not aware of any local cases of infections from these drugs.

To read the press release from the Florida DOH, click here.

Previous Florida Case of Contaminated Medication.

We have previously blogged about the problems encountered by Franck’s pharmacy in Ocala, Florida. It has been accused of distributing eye medications that contained a fungal infection. Click here for the first blog and here for the second blog on this.

Congress Debating on Giving Authority Over Compounding Pharmacies to FDA.

Currently, compounding pharmacies are regulated by state pharmacy boards. There is currently legislation moving through Congress that would give the FDA direct authority over the compounding manufacturers. The goal is to prevent any national outbreaks tied to compounded medications.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Pharmacies and Pharmacists.

The Health Law Firm represents pharmacists and pharmacies in investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, inspections and audits. The firm’s attorneys include those who are board certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law as well as licensed health professionals who are also attorneys.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sound Off.

Do you think each state should be responsible for regulating compounding pharmacies, or do you think the FDA should be responsible? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Gentry, Carol. “FL Got Drugs Linked to New Outbreak.” Health News Florida. (May 24, 2013). From: http://health.wusf.usf.edu/post/fl-got-drugs-linked-new-outbreak

Kelly, Christopher. “FDA Alerts Health Care Providers of Adverse Reactions Associated with Steroid Injections from Main Street Family Pharmacy in Tennessee.” Food and Drug Administration (May 24, 2013). From: http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm353941.htm

Stobbe, Mike and Loller, Travis. “FDA Warns of Infections Tied to Tennessee Pharmacy.” The Associated Press. (May 24, 2013). From: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=186473297

Florida Department of Health. “The Florida Department of Health Partners with Federal and State Health Organizations to Ward of Adverse Reactions Associated with Steroid Injections.” Florida Department of Health. (May 24, 2013). From: http://newsroom.doh.state.fl.us/wp-content/uploads/newsroom/2013/05/052413CDCinfection.pdf

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.
“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999. 

Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

The 20 Major Mistakes Physicians Make After Being Notified of a Department of Health Investigation

6 Indest-2008-3By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

The investigation of a complaint which could lead to the revocation of a physician’s license to practice, usually starts with a simple letter from the Department of Health (DOH). This is a very serious legal matter and it should be treated as such by the physician who receives it. Yet, in many cases, attorneys are consulted by physicians after the entire investigation is over and the damage is already done. Often, the mistakes that have been made severely compromise an attorney’s ability to achieve a favorable result for the physician.

These are the ten biggest mistakes we see in the physician cases we are called upon to defend after a Department of Health investigation of them is commenced:

1. Contacting the Department of Health (DOH) investigator and providing him/her an oral statement or oral interview.

2. Making a written statement in response to the “invitation” extended by the DOH investigator to do so.

3. Providing a copy of their curriculum vitae (CV) or resume to the investigator because the investigator requested them to do so.

4. Believing that if they “just explain it” the investigation will be closed and the case dropped.

5. Failing to submit a timely objection to a DOH subpoena, when there is a subpoena, and there are valid grounds to do so (e.g., patient does not want records released, patient privacy).

6. Failing to forward a complete copy of the patient medical record when subpoenaed by the DOH investigator as part of the investigation, when no objection is going to be filed.

7. Delegating the task of providing a complete copy of the patient medical record to office staff, resulting in an incomplete or partial copy being provided.

8. Failing to keep an exact copy of any document, letter or statement provided to the investigator.

9. Believing that the investigator has knowledge or experience in the medical or health care matters being investigated.

10. Believing that the investigator is merely attempting to ascertain the truth of the matter and, if the truth is known, this will result in the matter being dismissed.

11. Failing to check to see if their medical malpractice insurance carrier will pay the legal fees to defend them in this investigation.

12. Believing that because they haven’t heard anything for six or eight months (or even years in some instances) that the matter has “gone away.”

13. Believing that the case is indefensible so there is no reason to even try to advocate for getting it dismissed.

14. Failing to submit a written request to the investigator at the beginning of the investigation for a copy of the complete investigation report and file and then following up with additional requests until it is received.

15. Failing to exercise the right of submitting documents, statements, and expert opinions to rebut the findings made in the investigation report before the case is submitted to the Probable Cause Panel of the Board of Medicine for a decision.

16. Taking legal advice from their non-lawyer colleagues regarding what they should do in defending themselves in the investigation.

17. Attempting to defend themselves without the assistance of an attorney.

18. Believing that, because they know someone on (or previously on) the Board of Medicine, with the Department of Health or a state legislator, that influence can be exerted to have the case dismissed.

19. Providing copies of medical records to the DOH Investigator and signing a “Certificate of Completeness” so that the DOH can use these against them in its future disciplinary proceedings against them.

20. Failing to immediately retain the services of a health care attorney who is experienced in such matters to represent them and to communicate with the DOH investigator for them.

The key to a successful outcome in all of these cases is to obtain the assistance of a health care lawyer who is experienced in appearing before the Board of Medicine in such cases and does so on a regular basis.

To learn more about how The Health Law Firm can assist you if you are being investigated by the DOH, click here.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced with Department of Health Investigations of Physicians.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm provide legal representation to osteopathic physicians in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) investigations, FBI investigations and other types of investigations of health professionals and providers.  To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

KeyWords: Legal representation for Department of Health (DOH) investigations, DOH attorney, DOH investigation attorney, DOH defense attorney, Legal representation for DOH complaints, legal representation for licensure issues, legal representation for health care professionals, DOH complaint attorney, legal representation for Board of Medicine investigations, Board of Medicine attorney, Board of Medicine investigation attorney, Board of Medicine defense attorney, legal representation for Board of Medicine complaints, legal representation for licensure issues, legal representation for physicians, Board of Medicine complaint attorney, health law attorney, health law defense attorney, legal representation for physicians, doctor attorney, legal representation for complaints against physicians, The Health Law Firm, Florida health law defense attorney, reviews of The Health Law Firm, The Health Law Firm attorney reviews

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of and a registered service mark of The Health Law Firm, P.A., a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.Copyright © 2017 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

The 20 Major Mistakes Physicians Make After Being Notified of a Department of Health Investigation

6 Indest-2008-3By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

The investigation of a complaint which could lead to the revocation of a physician’s license to practice, usually starts with a simple letter from the Department of Health (DOH). This is a very serious legal matter and it should be treated as such by the physician who receives it. Yet, in many cases, attorneys are consulted by physicians after the entire investigation is over and the damage is already done. Often, the mistakes that have been made severely compromise an attorney’s ability to achieve a favorable result for the physician.

These are the ten biggest mistakes we see in the physician cases we are called upon to defend after a Department of Health investigation of them is commenced:

1. Contacting the Department of Health (DOH) investigator and providing him/her an oral statement or oral interview.

2. Making a written statement in response to the “invitation” extended by the DOH investigator to do so.

3. Providing a copy of their curriculum vitae (CV) or resume to the investigator because the investigator requested them to do so.

4. Believing that if they “just explain it” the investigation will be closed and the case dropped.

5. Failing to submit a timely objection to a DOH subpoena, when there is a subpoena, and there are valid grounds to do so (e.g., patient does not want records released, patient privacy).

6. Failing to forward a complete copy of the patient medical record when subpoenaed by the DOH investigator as part of the investigation, when no objection is going to be filed.

7. Delegating the task of providing a complete copy of the patient medical record to office staff, resulting in an incomplete or partial copy being provided.

8. Failing to keep an exact copy of any document, letter or statement provided to the investigator.

9. Believing that the investigator has knowledge or experience in the medical or health care matters being investigated.

10. Believing that the investigator is merely attempting to ascertain the truth of the matter and, if the truth is known, this will result in the matter being dismissed.

11. Failing to check to see if their medical malpractice insurance carrier will pay the legal fees to defend them in this investigation.

12. Believing that because they haven’t heard anything for six or eight months (or even years in some instances) that the matter has “gone away.”

13. Believing that the case is indefensible so there is no reason to even try to advocate for getting it dismissed.

14. Failing to submit a written request to the investigator at the beginning of the investigation for a copy of the complete investigation report and file and then following up with additional requests until it is received.

15. Failing to exercise the right of submitting documents, statements, and expert opinions to rebut the findings made in the investigation report before the case is submitted to the Probable Cause Panel of the Board of Medicine for a decision.

16. Taking legal advice from their non-lawyer colleagues regarding what they should do in defending themselves in the investigation.

17. Attempting to defend themselves without the assistance of an attorney.

18. Believing that, because they know someone on (or previously on) the Board of Medicine, with the Department of Health or a state legislator, that influence can be exerted to have the case dismissed.

19. Providing copies of medical records to the DOH Investigator and signing a “Certificate of Completeness” so that the DOH can use these against them in its future disciplinary proceedings against them.

20. Failing to immediately retain the services of a health care attorney who is experienced in such matters to represent them and to communicate with the DOH investigator for them.

The key to a successful outcome in all of these cases is to obtain the assistance of a health care lawyer who is experienced in appearing before the Board of Medicine in such cases and does so on a regular basis.

To learn more about how The Health Law Firm can assist you if you are being investigated by the DOH, click here.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced with Department of Health Investigations of Physicians.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm provide legal representation to osteopathic physicians in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) investigations, FBI investigations and other types of investigations of health professionals and providers.  To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

KeyWords: Legal representation for Department of Health (DOH) investigations, DOH attorney, DOH investigation attorney, DOH defense attorney, Legal representation for DOH complaints, legal representation for licensure issues, legal representation for health care professionals, DOH complaint attorney, legal representation for Board of Medicine investigations, Board of Medicine attorney, Board of Medicine investigation attorney, Board of Medicine defense attorney, legal representation for Board of Medicine complaints, legal representation for licensure issues, legal representation for physicians, Board of Medicine complaint attorney, health law attorney, health law defense attorney, legal representation for physicians, doctor attorney, legal representation for complaints against physicians, The Health Law Firm, Florida health law defense attorney, reviews of The Health Law Firm, The Health Law Firm attorney reviews

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of and a registered service mark of The Health Law Firm, P.A., a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.Copyright © 2017 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

The 20 Major Mistakes Physicians Make After Being Notified of a Department of Health Investigation

6 Indest-2008-3By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

The investigation of a complaint which could lead to the revocation of a physician’s license to practice, usually starts with a simple letter from the Department of Health (DOH). This is a very serious legal matter and it should be treated as such by the physician who receives it. Yet, in many cases, attorneys are consulted by physicians after the entire investigation is over and the damage is already done. Often, the mistakes that have been made severely compromise an attorney’s ability to achieve a favorable result for the physician.

These are the ten biggest mistakes we see in the physician cases we are called upon to defend after a Department of Health investigation of them is commenced:

1. Contacting the Department of Health (DOH) investigator and providing him/her an oral statement or oral interview.

2. Making a written statement in response to the “invitation” extended by the DOH investigator to do so.

3. Providing a copy of their curriculum vitae (CV) or resume to the investigator because the investigator requested them to do so.

4. Believing that if they “just explain it” the investigation will be closed and the case dropped.

5. Failing to submit a timely objection to a DOH subpoena, when there is a subpoena, and there are valid grounds to do so (e.g., patient does not want records released, patient privacy).

6. Failing to forward a complete copy of the patient medical record when subpoenaed by the DOH investigator as part of the investigation, when no objection is going to be filed.

7. Delegating the task of providing a complete copy of the patient medical record to office staff, resulting in an incomplete or partial copy being provided.

8. Failing to keep an exact copy of any document, letter or statement provided to the investigator.

9. Believing that the investigator has knowledge or experience in the medical or health care matters being investigated.

10. Believing that the investigator is merely attempting to ascertain the truth of the matter and, if the truth is known, this will result in the matter being dismissed.

11. Failing to check to see if their medical malpractice insurance carrier will pay the legal fees to defend them in this investigation.

12. Believing that because they haven’t heard anything for six or eight months (or even years in some instances) that the matter has “gone away.”

13. Believing that the case is indefensible so there is no reason to even try to advocate for getting it dismissed.

14. Failing to submit a written request to the investigator at the beginning of the investigation for a copy of the complete investigation report and file and then following up with additional requests until it is received.

15. Failing to exercise the right of submitting documents, statements, and expert opinions to rebut the findings made in the investigation report before the case is submitted to the Probable Cause Panel of the Board of Medicine for a decision.

16. Taking legal advice from their non-lawyer colleagues regarding what they should do in defending themselves in the investigation.

17. Attempting to defend themselves without the assistance of an attorney.

18. Believing that, because they know someone on (or previously on) the Board of Medicine, with the Department of Health or a state legislator, that influence can be exerted to have the case dismissed.

19. Providing copies of medical records to the DOH Investigator and signing a “Certificate of Completeness” so that the DOH can use these against them in its future disciplinary proceedings against them.

20. Failing to immediately retain the services of a health care attorney who is experienced in such matters to represent them and to communicate with the DOH investigator for them.

The key to a successful outcome in all of these cases is to obtain the assistance of a health care lawyer who is experienced in appearing before the Board of Medicine in such cases and does so on a regular basis.

To learn more about how The Health Law Firm can assist you if you are being investigated by the DOH, click here.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced with Department of Health Investigations of Physicians.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm provide legal representation to osteopathic physicians in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) investigations, FBI investigations and other types of investigations of health professionals and providers.  To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

KeyWords: Legal representation for Department of Health (DOH) investigations, DOH attorney, DOH investigation attorney, DOH defense attorney, Legal representation for DOH complaints, legal representation for licensure issues, legal representation for health care professionals, DOH complaint attorney, legal representation for Board of Medicine investigations, Board of Medicine attorney, Board of Medicine investigation attorney, Board of Medicine defense attorney, legal representation for Board of Medicine complaints, legal representation for licensure issues, legal representation for physicians, Board of Medicine complaint attorney, health law attorney, health law defense attorney, legal representation for physicians, doctor attorney, legal representation for complaints against physicians, The Health Law Firm, Florida health law defense attorney, reviews of The Health Law Firm, The Health Law Firm attorney reviews

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of and a registered service mark of The Health Law Firm, P.A., a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.Copyright © 2017 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

The 20 Major Mistakes Physicians Make After Being Notified of a Department of Health Investigation

6 Indest-2008-3By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

The investigation of a complaint which could lead to the revocation of a physician’s license to practice, usually starts with a simple letter from the Department of Health (DOH). This is a very serious legal matter and it should be treated as such by the physician who receives it. Yet, in many cases, attorneys are consulted by physicians after the entire investigation is over and the damage is already done. Often, the mistakes that have been made severely compromise an attorney’s ability to achieve a favorable result for the physician.

These are the ten biggest mistakes we see in the physician cases we are called upon to defend after a Department of Health investigation of them is commenced:

1. Contacting the Department of Health (DOH) investigator and providing him/her an oral statement or oral interview.

2. Making a written statement in response to the “invitation” extended by the DOH investigator to do so.

3. Providing a copy of their curriculum vitae (CV) or resume to the investigator because the investigator requested them to do so.

4. Believing that if they “just explain it” the investigation will be closed and the case dropped.

5. Failing to submit a timely objection to a DOH subpoena, when there is a subpoena, and there are valid grounds to do so (e.g., patient does not want records released, patient privacy).

6. Failing to forward a complete copy of the patient medical record when subpoenaed by the DOH investigator as part of the investigation, when no objection is going to be filed.

7. Delegating the task of providing a complete copy of the patient medical record to office staff, resulting in an incomplete or partial copy being provided.

8. Failing to keep an exact copy of any document, letter or statement provided to the investigator.

9. Believing that the investigator has knowledge or experience in the medical or health care matters being investigated.

10. Believing that the investigator is merely attempting to ascertain the truth of the matter and, if the truth is known, this will result in the matter being dismissed.

11. Failing to check to see if their medical malpractice insurance carrier will pay the legal fees to defend them in this investigation.

12. Believing that because they haven’t heard anything for six or eight months (or even years in some instances) that the matter has “gone away.”

13. Believing that the case is indefensible so there is no reason to even try to advocate for getting it dismissed.

14. Failing to submit a written request to the investigator at the beginning of the investigation for a copy of the complete investigation report and file and then following up with additional requests until it is received.

15. Failing to exercise the right of submitting documents, statements, and expert opinions to rebut the findings made in the investigation report before the case is submitted to the Probable Cause Panel of the Board of Medicine for a decision.

16. Taking legal advice from their non-lawyer colleagues regarding what they should do in defending themselves in the investigation.

17. Attempting to defend themselves without the assistance of an attorney.

18. Believing that, because they know someone on (or previously on) the Board of Medicine, with the Department of Health or a state legislator, that influence can be exerted to have the case dismissed.

19. Providing copies of medical records to the DOH Investigator and signing a “Certificate of Completeness” so that the DOH can use these against them in its future disciplinary proceedings against them.

20. Failing to immediately retain the services of a health care attorney who is experienced in such matters to represent them and to communicate with the DOH investigator for them.

The key to a successful outcome in all of these cases is to obtain the assistance of a health care lawyer who is experienced in appearing before the Board of Medicine in such cases and does so on a regular basis.

To learn more about how The Health Law Firm can assist you if you are being investigated by the DOH, click here.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced with Department of Health Investigations of Physicians.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm provide legal representation to osteopathic physicians in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) investigations, FBI investigations and other types of investigations of health professionals and providers.  To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

KeyWords: Legal representation for Department of Health (DOH) investigations, DOH attorney, DOH investigation attorney, DOH defense attorney, Legal representation for DOH complaints, legal representation for licensure issues, legal representation for health care professionals, DOH complaint attorney, legal representation for Board of Medicine investigations, Board of Medicine attorney, Board of Medicine investigation attorney, Board of Medicine defense attorney, legal representation for Board of Medicine complaints, legal representation for licensure issues, legal representation for physicians, Board of Medicine complaint attorney, health law attorney, health law defense attorney, legal representation for physicians, doctor attorney, legal representation for complaints against physicians, The Health Law Firm, Florida health law defense attorney, reviews of The Health Law Firm, The Health Law Firm attorney reviews

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of and a registered service mark of The Health Law Firm, P.A., a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.Copyright © 2017 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.