Licensing issues

Dentists, Talk to an Attorney Before You Talk to an Investigator

6 Indest-2008-3By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

In Florida, You DO NOT Have to Speak to an Investigator!

Despite mailing out hundreds of thousands of postcards and letters to dentists, throughout Florida, we continue to receive calls from new clients and from potential clients, after they have already spoken to and made critical harmful admissions against their own interests to investigators. In Florida, you do not have any duty to cooperate with any investigator who is investigating you. This extends to Department of Health (DOH) investigators (who are sometimes titled “Medical Quality Assurance Investigators” or “Medical Malpractice Investigators”), Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) special agents, police officers, sheriff’s deputies, or criminal investigators of any type.

Investigators are NOT There to Help You.

Let me state this as succinctly and clearly as possible. If you are being investigated, you will not be better off making a statement. You will not be better off explaining your side of the story. The investigator is not your friend. The investigator is not on your side. All you are doing is falling for a trick and helping the government to make a case against you.

Protect Your License and Your Livelihood.

You have a right under the U.S. Constitution to not make any statement that may be used against you. This is so important that in criminal cases government investigators are required to advise you of this by reciting to you your Miranda rights.

However, in cases where you might have your dental license revoked or have your DEA number revoked or lose your Medicare provider status or your Medicaid provider status, the investigator is not required to advise you of your rights.

In a criminal case, there may be ways to have your statement thrown out. However, in a professional licensing case or other administrative case, it may be too late to avoid the damage. You may be the best witness the government has and you may be the only witness the government needs to prove ths case against you.

In the case where you could receive a $100 criminal fine, the investigators are required to read you your constitutional Miranda rights and to be sure that you understand them before you make a statement. However, in a case where you can lose your dental license, where you could lose your livelihood and ability to make a living, where you could lose everything you have worked so hard to obtain, they are not required to do this. You must protect yourself.

Many dentists, when confronted by an investigator, who will usually call at a very inconvenient time (to catch you by surprise) and will usually flash a badge (to intimidate you), will refuse to acknowledge the seriousness of the matter and will fall for the bait to “tell their side of the story.” This can be fatal to your defense and fatal to your license.

If You Anything You Run the Risk of Ruining Your Defense.

In the absence of a statement by the suspect (in this case, let’s assume this is YOU), the government may have a very difficult time of proving that you have committed any offense. It may have other witnesses (who may not be around at the time of any hearing or trial). It may have a lot of physical evidence or documents. But it may be impossible for the government investigators to make any link between you and the evidence, unless you help the investigators do this. You would be surprised at how many dentists believe that they can just talk their way out of the situation; in reality, they are just giving evidence that is used to make the case against them.

Any evidence at all, just admitting that you were there, admitting that the documents are yours, admitting that the patient was yours, admitting that you worked at the clinic, admitting that you wrote the prescription, admitting that the property is yours, admitting that you were on duty at the time, admitting that you have taken a drug, admitting that you signed the form, can be a crucial piece of evidence that could not otherwise be proven without your own testimony.

Remember, this is the investigators’ job and profession. This is what they do full time, every day. And they are very good at it. They are 1,000 times better at getting you to admit the crucial elements of a disciplinary infraction than you are in “talking your way out of it.” They will not be convinced by any excuses you make. They do not have to be. They will not be the ones making the final decision against you. Theirs is the job of putting together the case against you. You will help them by talking to them, explaining why your decisions are correct, explaining why what you did is excusable, etc. It will not work. You will merely be giving them enough rope to hang you with.

Why are You Being Investigated?

Hint: If it is a Medicaid Fraud Control Unit (MFCU) special agent (investigator), you are probably under investigation for Medicaid fraud.

Hint: If it is an “auditor,” “surveyor” or “investigator” from an agency or company with “integrity” or “program integrity” in its name, they are probably investigating you for “lack of integrity,” i.e., false claims or fraud.

Hint: If it is a Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) special agent (investigator) they are probably investigating you to prosecute you or to revoke your DEA registration for drug or prescribing violations.

Hint: If it is an Office of the Inspector General (OIG) special agent (investigator), you are probably under investigation for Medicare fraud or Medicare false claims.

Hint: If it is a Department of Health Quality Assurance Investigator or Medical Malpractice Investigator, they are probably only investigating possible disciplinary action against your license that could result in large administrative fines or revocation of your license.

Talking to the Investigator May Make It Worse.

Do not believe for a second that you are smarter than the investigator. Do not believe for a second that you will convince the investigator (or anyone else) that there is a legal or medical justification for what you did or what they allege. If it were as simple as that, then why would there be an investigation and why would you be the one being investigated?

Additionally, do not believe for a second that you can lie your way out of it, either. Remember, if the government cannot prove the basic offense that it is investigating against you, it may be able to prove that you have committed perjury or lied to an investigator. In the case of a federal official or a federal investigation, merely making a false statement (oral or written) to an investigator is a criminal act. This is what Martha Stewart and many others have served time for in federal prisons.

These investigators are lied to all the time. They are usually better at detecting lies than a polygraph expert is. Furthermore, in most cases, you will be the very last person to be interviewed. Therefore, they will already know just about everything that can be used against you. If your statement contradicts in any way what others have told them, they will know you are the one who is lying. However, knowing something or suspecting something does not mean it will be something that can be proven in court or in an administrative hearing.

Talk to a Lawyer Prior to Making a Statement.

It is much better to make no statement at all. Blame it on your attorney. Tell the investigator that your attorney will kill you if you were to talk to the investigator without your attorney being there ahead of time. “Speak to my attorney.” “My attorney can help you, I can’t.”

All you have to do is state “I must talk to my lawyer before I say anything.” “I will have my lawyer contact you.” “I cannot say anything until I talk to my lawyer.” “I want a lawyer.”

If you are not the one being investigated, then there is no good reason why the investigator would want you to make a statement before you consulted with your attorney. What is the rush?

Then you must also avoid the old trick of the investigator telling you “If you don’t have anything to hide, why would you need a lawyer?” Please don’t fall for this trick, either. This is America. Smart people and rich people spend a lot of money on attorneys and other professionals to represent them and advise them. There is a good reason why they do this.

Far too often the doctor only calls us after he has given a statement. This is usually too late to avoid much of the damage that will have been be caused.

Everything above applies to oral statements or written statements. Do not make either. Contact a lawyer as soon as possible, preferably before making any statement, no matter how simple, defensive, self-serving or innocuous you may think it to be.

Think of this as an intelligence test. Are you smart enough to follow this guidance and avoid this type of mistake?

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced with Investigations of Dentists.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm provide legal representation to dentists in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) investigations, FBI investigations, Medicare investigations, Medicaid investigations and other types of investigations of health professionals and providers.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

 

How to Relocate Your Practice

By Thu Pham, O.D., Law Clerk, The Health Law Firm

Relocating your practice can be stressful. There are many things that you need to do such as physically moving all of your equipment, moving your utility services, and notifying your insurance companies, notifying the Department of Health (DOH), notifying Medicare and Medicaid, and, most important, notifying your patients. Optometrists sometimes forget that they should also notify their patients of the move.

Florida Administrative Code.

Rule 64B13-3.002(2), Florida Administrative Code, requires that an optometrist give notice to patients when he or she relocates or withdraws services so that the patient may make arrangements for follow-up eye care and knows where to obtain a copy of the prior treatment record. The notice should identify the optometrist’s new location or the location for which the patient may obtain his records. The notice must be in compliance with Rule 64B13-3.003(7), Florida Administrative Code. This section requires that the notice be published in the newspaper of greatest general circulation in each county for which the optometrist practiced indicating that the records are available from a specified eye care at a certain location. So for example, if you live in the Orlando area, you would want to publish the notice in the Orlando Sentinel. Make sure that you obtain and keep a copy of your notice from the newspaper just in case the board audits you or someone files a complaint.

Click here for a link to obtain a complete copy of Optometry statutes and regulations.

Failure to Comply with Rules Could Result in an Investigation.

Moving can be a stressful time. It is important for an optometrist to remember to notify his patients of the move in the manner required by the Board of Optometry rules. Failure to do so could result in a complaint being filed and an investigation initiated against you.

If You Are Contacted By an Investigator, Seek the Advice of an Experienced Health Law Attorney.

When you receive any notice, by telephone, by mail, by hand delivery or by information passed along by your employer, that an investigation has been opened against your professional license, immediately contact an attorney experienced in such matters. Do not talk to the investigator. Do not talk to the prosecuting attorney. Do not call the state agency and ask for advice on what you should do. Do not send a written statement explaining your side of the story.

You have important constitutional rights that protect you. But you have to exercise the common sense required to use these rights. Part of this is by obtaining competent legal counsel who can advise you and protect your rights. Again, we remind you that unless an attorney routinely handles this type of case, he or she may be unfamiliar with what your rights are in such a situation or how to handle it.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sound Off?

How did you handle a previous move? Did you find the time to be stressful for you, your staff and your patients? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

About the Author: Dr. Thu Pham, OD, is a law clerk with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.

Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Phony Plastic Surgeon Pleaded Guilty to Performing Surgeries on Patients Without a Medical License

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

A fake New York plastic surgeon was convicted on September 7, 2012, for performing cosmetic surgeries between April 2011 and December 2011, without a medical license. He’s also accused of completing the surgeries without general anesthesia and permanently disfiguring his patients. This is all according to the New York Attorney General’s (AG) Office.

To see the entire press release on this arrest, click here.

Phony Plastic Surgeon Will Spend Time in Prison.

According to New York AG, Eric Schneiderman,  the fake plastic surgeon allegedly admitted to soliciting patients from a full-service spa, holding himself out as a licensed physician, and performing liposuction and other invasive procedures on patients without a medical license.

An article on Stamford Daily Voice stated the man pleaded guilty to unlicensed practice of a profession. He will spend six months in prison followed by five years of probation. He will also be responsible for paying $8,700 in restitution.

 

A teenager in Florida was recently found guilty of impersonating a Physician’s Assistant (PA). I also blogged about this case. To read that blog, click here.

The license status of most health care professionals can be checked online. In Florida, license verification for all health care professionals can be checked on the Florida Department of Health (DOH) website.

Two Others Co-Defendants in This Case.

The Stamford Daily Voice names two other men that are accused of working with the fake plastic surgeon. One, who is also allegedly not a licensed doctor, is still at large. The other is a licensed physician and has charges pending against him.

With our luck, they are probably here in Florida somewhere, most likely practicing medicine. South Beach and Miami seem to attract their unfair share of fake plastic surgeons and phony doctors, although the rest of the state seems to get plenty, too.

Click here to read the Stamford Daily Voice article.

More stories on Fake Physicians and Other Health Professionals to Come.

In the near future on this blog, we will include additional articles on fake doctors and health professionals, some old, some new.

Have you heard any stories of fake doctors? Tell us what you think of this blog.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced with Investigations of Health Professionals and Providers.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm provide legal representation to physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, CRNAs, dentists, pharmacists, psychologists and other health providers in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) investigations, FBI investigations, Medicare investigations, Medicaid investigations and other types of investigations of health professionals and providers.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources:

Buzzeo, Anthony. “Man Pleads Guilty to Posting as a Doctor in Stamford.” Stamford Daily Voice. (September 7, 2012). From: http://stamford.dailyvoice.com/police-fire/man-guilty-posing-doctor-stamford

Attorney General’s Office. “A. G. Schneiderman Announces Conviction Of Fake Plastic Surgeon Who Disfigured Patients.” Attorney General New York. (September 7, 2012). From: http://www.ag.ny.gov/press-release/g-schneiderman-announces-conviction-fake-plastic-surgeon-who-disfigured-patients

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Phony Florida Physician Uses Silicone and Krazy Glue – Arrested Twice for Practicing Medicine Without a License

6 Indest-2008-3By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

A South Florida man was arrested on February 6, 2013, for allegedly injecting people with silicone in a West Palm Beach motel room. He has been charged with practicing medicine without a license. According to the Sun Sentinel, this was the man’s second arrest within two months for the same crime.

Click here to read the entire article from the Sun Sentinel.

This “Krazy” Tale.

Police say this fake physician injected his customers with buttocks-enhancing silicone injections. He would then allegedly seal up the skin wounds with Krazy Glue. Victims said he would not wear gloves or protective clothing during the procedures. Each victim was charged $200 for each visit. This phony health professional was also arrested in January 2013, when two victims told investigators similar stories about his illegal injections.

In each case, the side effects in patients included severe infections, and the damage is thought to be permanent.

South Florida and Phony Health Professionals.

This is by no means the first report we’ve heard of phony health professionals in South Florida injecting people with toxic chemicals. Back in 2012, a number of people became sick and deformed after a Broward County, Florida, woman allegedly injected victims’ buttocks, hips and breasts with a combination of Fix-A-Flat tire sealant, cement, mineral oil and Super Glue. One of the victims died as a result of the procedure, according to the Daily Mail Reporter. The victims claimed the woman administering the injections presented herself as a medical professional and wore a nurse’s uniform.

To read more on this story from the Daily Mail Reporter, click here.

Practicing Without a License Is a Crime.


Practicing medicine without a license is a crime. Additionally, so is helping someone practice medicine without a license. As a practitioner, you may be asked to supervise or join a practice. Remember that your license may be at stake with any wrongdoing by your subordinates. Before you join a practice or agree to supervise others, check first with the Department of Health (DOH) that the other providers are legitimate. You can verify a license for free on the DOH’s website.

Also, remember that a license to practice medicine in Venezuela, Cuba, or anywhere else, is just that: a license to practice in that country. It does not allow a person to practice medicine in the United States. A specific license from the State of Florida is required to practice in Florida, except for certain military and federal physicians. Always check the physician’s license.

More Stories on Fake Physicians and Other Phony and Fraudulent Professionals to Come.


In the near future on this blog we will include additional articles on fake doctors and health professionals, some old, some new.

To see a blog on a fake dentist in Miami, click here. You can also read the story of a fake plastic surgeon in New York by clicking here.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced with Investigations of Health Professionals and Providers.


The attorneys of The Health Law Firm provide legal representation to physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, CRNAs, dentists, pharmacists, psychologists and other health providers in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) investigations, FBI investigations, Medicare investigations, Medicaid investigations and other types of investigations of health professionals and providers.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.
Comments?

What do you think of all of these news stories of phony health care professionals? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Komedna, Ed. “‘Motel Surgeon’ Arrested Again for Silicone Injections, Deputies Say.” Sun Sentinel. (February 6, 2013). From: http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/palm-beach/fl-butler-surgery-arrest-20130206,0,2237567.story

United Press International Inc. “Man Arrested Again for Buttocks Injections.” United Press International Inc. (February 6, 2013). From: http://www.upi.com/Top_News/US/2013/02/07/Arrest-for-illegal-silicone-injections/UPI-97251360271074/?spt=hs&or=tn

Daily Mail Reporter. “Toxic tush transgender nurse charged with manslaughter after patient DIES following ‘injection with rubber cement and tire sealant in backroom cosmetic surgery’.” (July 26, 2012). From: www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2179631/Toxic-tush-nurse-Oneal-Morris-charged-manslaughter-patient-DIES.html#axzz2KKi2pPmh

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Contracting 101: Tips for Physicians and Health Professionals – Part 1

By Christopher E. Brown, J.D., and George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

This blog is the first in a series intended to provide an introductory review of the basics of contracting for physicians and health professionals, primarily by discussing employment agreements. We will highlight many of the common provisions found in employment contracts, along with many of the mistakes and pitfalls that we see in our day-to-day practice.

By the end of the series it is our hope that physicians and other health professionals will understand the common language and terms found in employment contracts for professionals so they can recognize mistakes commonly made by physicians and health professionals when negotiating them. We hope to help make both employers and employees more knowledgeable about employment contracts so they can avoid potential problem areas and legal entanglements.

Our comments here are meant to provide general rules we have learned from our experience. However, please remember, every situation is different and there are exceptions to every rule.

Tip 1 – There is No Such Thing as a “Standard” or “Routine” Physician Employment Agreement.

No two employment agreements are identical. Each must be reviewed on its own terms. It is important to consult with a healthcare lawyer experienced in negotiating employment contracts and evaluating health care business transactions.

Tip 2 – Everything is Negotiable.

Even though an employer may have what appears to be a “standard” employment contract for all physician employees, this can have changes, amendments, schedules, exhibits or terms that are varied from physician to physician or professional to professional. Generally, large employers are less likely to change their form to accommodate the physician than small organizations, but they can and often will. Small employers are often willing to make more changes to their written agreements.

If there are any changes, additions or clarifications you need to make to the contract, then put them in writing, sign them, incorporate them into the contract and attach them to the contract.

Tip 3 – Be Sure the Wording of the Contract Represents Exactly the Agreements you Made Orally.

If it is different or not specified, the language in the contract will govern in any future dispute.

Future Blogs on Employment Contracting.

In our future blogs, we will continue to provide tips on various issues to watch for in health care employment contracts.

Contact a Health Care Attorney Experienced in Negotiating and Evaluating Physician and Health Professional’s Business Transactions.

At the Health Law Firm we provide legal services for all health care providers and professionals. This includes physicians, nurses, dentists, psychologists, psychiatrists, mental health counselors, durable medical equipment suppliers (DME), medical students and interns, hospitals, ambulatory surgical centers, pain management clinics, nursing homes, and any other health care provider.

The services we provide include reviewing and negotiating contracts, preparing contracts, helping employers and employees enforce contracts, advice on setting aside or voiding contracts, litigation of contracts (in start or federal court), business transactions, professional license defense, opinion letters, representation in investigations, fair hearing defense, representation in peer review and clinical privileges hearings, litigation of restrictive covenant (covenants not to compete), Medicare and Medicaid audits, commercial litigation, and administrative hearings.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Authors: Christopher E. Brown, J.D., is an attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

 

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.

Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Chiropractors Not Allowed to Work for Clinics Owned by Non-Chiropractors in Florida, with Limited Exceptions

00011_RT8By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Apparently there are many chiropractic physicians and other medical business owners who are unaware of the prohibition provided in Florida law against a chiropractor providing services for a business owned by non-chiropractors. By non-chiropractor, this means anyone who does not have a current, active Florida chiropractic physician’s license.

The prohibition for chiropractors was passed into law in Florida originally in 2007. The law was amended in 2012. There had previously been similar prohibitions that applied to dentists and optometrists. To read the article I wrote on these issues, click here.

What’s the Purpose of This Law?

Found in Section 460.4167, Florida Statutes, the law states that a person (which includes a corporation or limited liability company), may not engage the services of a chiropractor as either an employee or an independent contractor to provide chiropractic services, except under a limited set of circumstances. To see the complete text of Section 460.4167, Florida Statutes, click here.

The purpose of the Florida Legislature in passing this law is set forth within the law itself. Subsection 4 of the law states:

The purpose of this section is to prevent a person other than the licensed chiropractic physician from influencing or otherwise interfering with the exercise of the chiropractic physician’s independent professional judgment. In addition to the acts specified [elsewhere in the statute], . . . a person or entity other than [the ones excepted] . . . may not employ or engage a chiropractic physician licensed under this chapter.

Exceptions to the Law.

There are, of course, exceptions stated in this law for organizations that are allowed to employ or contract with chiropractors. These include:

1. Business entities owned solely by chiropractors (licensed in Florida) and their immediate family members.

2. Business entities owned by medical, osteopathic or podiatric physicians licensed in Florida.

3. Business entities owned by hospitals.

4. A clinic that trains chiropractic students that is affiliated with an accredited chiropractic college.

5. A public or private college or university.

6. A business entity that is owned by a corporation that is tax exempt under certain Internal Revenue Service regulations (not-for-profit corporation).

7. A publicly traded corporation.

8. An insurance company licensed in Florida.

9. An HMO or prepaid health clinic (as set forth in chapter 641, Florida Statutes).

10. A clinic licensed as a Health Care Clinic under Florida Statutes, which provides chiropractic services by a licensed Florida chiropractor and also provides other health care services by medical doctors or osteopathic physicians, the medical director of which is licensed under chapter 458 (medical doctors) or chapter 459 (osteopathic physicians), Florida Statutes.

Special Exception for Clinics Licensed Under Florida’s Health Care Clinic Licensure Act.

This last exception, one for clinics licensed under Florida’s Health Care Clinic Licensure Act (Section 400.990, Florida Statutes), provides perhaps the broadest exception. A clinic that is properly licensed by the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA), and meets the other requirements of the law, can be legally owned by non-chiropractors or non-physicians, and chiropractors may legally contract with or be employed by them. The safeguard is that the licensing requirements in Section 400.990 must be met, and physician services other than just chiropractic services must be performed at the clinic.

However, even under the exception provided by the Health Care Clinic Act, any agreement or other arrangement with the chiropractic physician whereby the other person (or an entity) provides the chiropractor with chiropractic equipment or chiropractic materials must contain a provision whereby the chiropractic physician expressly maintains complete care, custody and control of the equipment or practice.

To see the complete text of the Florida Health Care Clinic Act, click here.

Violating the Law Puts Your Professional License in Jeopardy.

If the business entity, clinic or group does not fall squarely within one of the exceptions listed above, the chiropractor may not legally be employed by or provide chiropractic services for it. The penalties for violating this law include:

1. Prosecution for a felony in the third degree.

2. Any contracts associated with the services are void.

3. Disciplinary action against health care licensees pursuant to chapter 456 or chapter 460, Florida Statutes.

4. By implication, since any contracts in violation are void, then any fees or bills for services in violation of the act are also void.

Don’t jeopardize your professional license, your reputation, your assets or your liberty by risking a violation of this act. Consult with an experienced health lawyer on any such business venture or proposal.

Contact a Health Care Attorney Experienced in Negotiating and Evaluating Physician and Health Professional’s Business Transactions.

At the Health Law Firm we provide legal services for all health care providers and professionals. This includes physicians, nurses, dentists, chiropractors, psychologists, psychiatrists, mental health counselors, durable medical equipment suppliers (DME), medical students and interns, hospitals, ambulatory surgical centers, pain management clinics, nursing homes, and any other health care provider.

The services we provide include reviewing and negotiating contracts, preparing contracts, helping employers and employees enforce contracts, advice on setting aside or voiding contracts, litigation of contracts (in start or federal court), business transactions, professional license defense, opinion letters, representation in investigations, fair hearing defense, representation in peer review and clinical privileges hearings, litigation of restrictive covenant (covenants not to compete), Medicare and Medicaid audits, commercial litigation, and administrative hearings.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

Were you aware of this law and its exceptions? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

 

The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved. 

The Collateral Effects of Voluntary Relinquishment with Investigation Pending or other Discipline on Your Massage Therapy License

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Many massage therapists are unaware of the drastic long-term effects that discipline on their massage therapist license could have. This includes submitting a voluntary relinquishment of the massage therapist’s license while there is an investigation pending or while there are charges pending. Although this particular article is being prepared specifically for massage therapists, similar principles apply to physicians, nurses, pharmacists, psychologists, dentists, mental health counselors and other licensed health professionals.

A voluntary relinquishment of the license after notice of the opening of an investigation or while a charge is pending is treated the same as a disciplinary revocation of the license. It is reported out the same and is treated the same. In some cases it may even be worse, if the agreement to voluntarily relinquish also includes an agreement to never apply for another license again.

Even discipline on the massage therapy license such as a suspension, probation, restrictions, etc., can have far-lasting adverse repercussions. Most people do not understand what else can happen as a result of a discipline, revocation or even voluntary relinquishment (under these circumstances).

Reports to National Organizations on the Discipline.

First and foremost, the discipline (including voluntary relinquishment) will be a public record. It will also be reported out to national reporting agencies, including the National Practitioner Data Bank (NPDB) and the National Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork (NCBTMB).

As a result of the report to the NPDB, the Office of the Inspector General (OIG) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) will probably start action to exclude the disciplined therapist from the Medicare Program and place him or her on the OIG’s List of Excluded Individual’s and Entities (LEIE). This will bar you from the Medicare Program or working for or contracting with anyone else who does (including insurer’s medical clinics and most health care providers). This by itself will also have many negative consequences. For example, if you are excluded from the Medicare Program you are automatically placed on the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) “debarred” list. You are automatically excluded from working for or contracting with, in any capacity, any organization, individual or agency that has any government contracts or accepts any federal funding. This act can bar you from working for a public school, working as a real estate agent, or many other jobs.

The NCBTMB will also take action to revoke your national certification given by the NCBTMB. This will exclude you from being licensed in any other state.

Summary of Adverse Consequences of Revocation or Other Discipline.

To summarize, the most important adverse problems that may be caused as a result of discipline on your license, may include the following:

1. May cause discipline to be commenced against any other health professional license you have, such as a nurse, acupuncture physician, chiropractic assistant, nurse’s aide, home health assistant, etc.

2. Will prevent you from obtaining any health professional license in the future.

3. May cause discipline to be commenced against any massage therapy establishment license for a massage therapy establishment you own in whole or in part.

4. Any other states or jurisdictions in which you have a license will also initiate action against him or her in that jurisdiction.

5. The National Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork (NCBTMB) will also take action to revoke your national certification given by the NCBTMB. This will exclude you from being licensed in any other state and will cause any other state in which you are licensed to take action against you.

6. Mandatory report to the National Practitioner Data Base (NPDB)), which remains there for 50 years. (Note: Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank or HIPDB recently folded into NPDB.)

7. The OIG of HHS will take action to exclude the provider from the Medicare Program. If this occurs, (and most of these offenses require mandatory exclusion) the provider will be placed on the List of Excluded Individuals and Entities (LEIE) maintained by the OIG HHS.

8. If the above occurs, the provider is also automatically “debarred” or prohibited from participating in any capacity in any federal contracting and is placed on the U.S. General Services Administration’s (GSA’s) debarment list.

9. Third party payors (health insurance companies, HMOs, etc.) will terminate the professional’s contract or panel membership with that organization.

10. Regardless of any of the above, any facility licensed by AHCA (hospitals, skilled nursing facilities (SNFs), public health clinics, group homes for the developmentally disabled, etc.) that are required to perform background screenings on their employees will result in AHCA notifying the facility and the professional that he or she is disqualified from employment.

What Can be Done?

If you have submitted a voluntary relinquishment without understanding the consequences, and the Board of Massage Therapy (“Board”) has not acted to accept it, you may withdraw it. What we do is submit a letter to the Executive Director of the Board stating it was submitted by mistake without fully understanding the consequences, and the massage therapist desires to withdraw the voluntary relinquishment. We submit this immediately (keeping a copy, of course) and by certified mail, return receipt requested, so we have proof of sending and proof of receipt.

However, you must also ask for a formal hearing to dispute the facts in your case, as well. We usually do this at the same time and by the same method. If you fail to request a formal hearing, then you are waiving your rights to challenge your guilt or innocence.

If you have requested an informal hearing, you have made a big mistake. For an informal hearing, you admit that everything stated in the complaint against you is true. You have admitted that all of the charges against you are correct, so you are pleading guilty to the charges. You are then giving up the right to have a hearing to determine whether you are really guilty or innocent. All you are going to be arguing about is the punishment you will receive. You will not be allowed to testify on or introduce any evidence on your guilt or innocence.

If you have submitted a request for an informal hearing, not realizing this, then what we usually do is to submit an immediate request to have the hearing changed over to a formal administrative hearing where you are allowed to dispute the facts against you and prove your innocence. In such a case, it is necessary to submit a Petition for a Formal Administrative Hearing and to specify which facts are contested or disputed and why.

The case is then sent to a neutral administrative law judge (ALJ) to hold a hearing on the case. The state Department of Health (DOH) (the parent agency over the Board of Massage Therapy) is then required to prove the facts against you by clear and convincing evidence. In fact, you do not even have to introduce any evidence or testimony, the burden of proof is on the DOH to prove the case against you.

Emergency Suspension Orders (ESOs), Appeals and Election of Rights (EOR) Forms.

In Florida, if you have an Emergency Suspension Order (ESO), you can appeal it to a court of appeal. The problem with this is that it is very technical to do so and is very costly. Call an attorney who specializes in appeals or appellate law and ask. Additionally, the court of appeal only rules on the law and not the facts. The appeal court will be required to accept everything that is stated in the ESO as true. There is no fact hearing, there are only legal arguments. Your basic case will be delayed while this takes place, and you will probably lose on appeal. This may not be the correct choice for you.

However, if there is an ESO, you also have the right to an expedited fact hearing on it. This may be the best course of action if you have documents and facts to show you are not guilty of the charges.

Furthermore, there will also be an additional document served on you, an administrative complaint (AC). When you receive the AC, it will probably say just about the same thing as the ESO. You will be given your hearing rights when this occurs (called an “Election of Rights” form or “EOR”). As we indicated above, you will almost always want to select a formal administrative hearing in which you dispute (challenge or contest) the allegations (charges) made against you. This is the only way you will have the right to have a full and fair hearing on your innocence of the charges. Make sure it is submitted in plenty of time to be received within the 21 days given. Seek legal advice in completing it. Do not admit to anything; you don’t have to as the state DOH has the burden of proof.

The Need for an Experienced Health Law Attorney.

It is very difficult to take the actions necessary yourself if you do not have any legal training. Nonlawyers make many stupid mistakes in these proceedings, including submitting written statements that can be used against them when they do not have to do so, talking to the DOH investigator or Board personnel, talking to the DOH prosecuting attorney, making admissions which can be used against them, and waiving their rights when they do not have to do so.

Most attorneys are not familiar with these types of procedures if they do not practice health law. They do not realize that the same rights which apply in criminal cases also apply to professional licensure cases. You need to find and hire an attorney experienced in this type of case. That would be a health law attorney, and preferably one who is Board Certified by the Florida Bar in Health Law.

What You Should Do.

So the bottom line is that if you are innocent and want to dispute any charges against you, you should:

1. If you have professional insurance coverage, such as HPSO Insurance, see if your insurance will cover your legal defense expenses in this type of case. Many will. We know HPSO will.

2. Act right away to request all of your rights in any matter. Make sure that anything you submit is actually received (not mailed, received) before the deadline given.

3. Do not call, write or speak to the DOH investigator, Board personnel, DOH personnel or the DOH attorney.

4. Do not make a statement, written or oral, to the DOH investigator, Board personnel, DOH personnel or the DOH attorney.

5. Contest (dispute or fight) every action that might be stated against you, including one by the NCBTMB or OIG.

6. Do not admit to anything you don’t have to as the state DOH has the burden of proof.

7. Keep copies of all forms or letters submitted, along with proof of mailing and proof of receipt (send via certified mail, return receipt requested).

8. Retain the services of a health lawyer who has experience in Board of Massage Therapy/Department of Health (DOH) cases (ask him or her how many he or she has actually done). DO THIS FIRST, NOT LAST!

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced with Department of Health (DOH) Investigations of Massage Therapists.
The attorneys of The Health Law Firm provide legal representation to massage therapists in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, licensing matters and other types of investigations of health professionals and providers.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Why You Should Not Voluntarily Relinquish Your Medical License or DEA Registration Number

8 Indest-2008-5By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

I am often contacted by clients who are health professionals or own businesses in the health care industry who have been approached by government agents or investigators regarding possible complaints or charges. In many cases, the individuals involved do not think to consult with an attorney until many months later, and this may be too late to save the business or professional practice involved. This holds for physicians, dentists, nurses, pharmacists, pharmacies, pain management clinics, physician assistants, group homes, assisted living facilities (ALFs) and home health agencies, among others.

“Voluntary” Relinquishment Treated the Same as a Revoked License.

We have seen a trend recently, especially here in Florida, of investigators immediately offering the person being investigated the option to voluntarily relinquish his or her professional license. This is offered as an option to being investigated, even in the event of very minor or frivolous complaints. The problem is that once an investigation has been opened, then a voluntary relinquishment of a license is treated the same as if it were revoked for disciplinary reasons. It will be very difficult, if not impossible, to ever get a new license under the circumstances.

Furthermore, if the professional has other licenses or similar licenses in other states, then this will be reported to the other states and disciplinary action will probably be initiated against those other licenses.

We have heard horror stories of investigators, accompanied by police or sheriff’s deputies or Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) agents, making all sorts of threats against a health professional in order to intimidate him or her into giving up a DEA registration number or professional license, including medical licenses, nursing licenses and pharmacy licenses.

In the case of such an incident occurring in Florida, the “voluntary” relinquishment must still be presented to the applicable professional Board and voted on at a scheduled meeting, since it is considered to be disciplinary. It may be possible to withdraw the “voluntary” relinquishment before it is voted on, so all may not be lost.

Think Long and Hard About Relinquishing DEA Registration Number.

However, in the case of the DEA, a DEA registration number is considered gone as soon as the “voluntary” relinquishment paper is signed. This is one of the reasons it is crucial to talk with a knowledgeable health law attorney before making such a decision. The ones putting pressure on you to do this will do everything they can to persuade you not to talk to an attorney. But it is your right to do so. Don’t be rushed or intimidated into making a foolish decision you will regret.

We have represented clients attempting to obtain a new DEA registration number or a new professional license many years after they did a voluntary relinquishment. In most cases, it is an extreme uphill battle and is often not successful.

Additional Consequences of Voluntary Relinquishment of a Professional License or DEA Registration Number.

The following are some of the additional consequences of voluntary relinquishment of professional license or DEA number after notice of an investigation:

1. Disciplinary action will be commenced against any other professional licenses in the state.

2. Disciplinary action will be commenced against any similar licenses in other states.

3. The matter will be reported to any national certification boards of which you are a member and they will most likely commence action against you to revoke your national certification.

4. You will be placed on the Office of the Inspector General’s (OIG) List of Excluded Entities and Individuals (LEIE) and excluded from the federal Medicare Program.

5. You will be terminated from the state’s Medicaid Program, if you are a Medicaid provider.

6. You will be terminated from the panels of any health insurers or managed care plans of which you are a provider member.

There are many other possible repercussions to such actions, so it is extremely important to be prepared if such an event occurs. To prepare you can:

1. Purchase professional licensing defense insurance coverage through Lloyd’s of London, Healthcare Provider’s Service Organization (HPSO), Nurses Service Organization (NSO) or one of the other reputable insurance companies that provide such coverage.

2. Have the names, telephone numbers and other information on good, reputable criminal defense and health law attorneys at hand at all times. Make sure your practice manager has this information as well.

3. Call as soon as an investigator walks in. Don’t wait.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced with Investigations of Health Professionals and Providers.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm provide legal representation to physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, CRNAs, dentists, pharmacists, psychologists and other health providers in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) investigations, FBI investigations, Medicare investigations, Medicaid investigations and other types of investigations of health professionals and providers.


To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

Have you ever been approached by government agents or investigators about possible complaints or changes? What was the experience like? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

 

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Phony Dentist Gets Busted for Child Abuse After Injuring Teen During Illegal Dental Procedures

George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

A Miami man, his wife and their daughter have been charged with child abuse following two alleged dental procedures that left a 14-year-old girl permanently disfigured. According to a number of sources, the three were arrested on September 12, 2012, at their home-operated dental office.

Click here to see the man’s arrest affidavit from the Miami Police Department.

14-Year-Old Left in Pain and Disfigured After Procedures.

According to the Miami Herald, when the 14-year-old girl broke a front tooth, she and her mother went to the man, who claimed to be a dentist when he lived in Cuba. He offered to perform the dental work in the back room of his home office for $500. Instead of fixing the tooth, the article states the man filed all four of the girl’s front teeth down to the gums. He then allegedly fit her with a permanent bridge, which the mother described as an “iron bridge painted white with the form of teeth.”

The victim was allegedly left with swollen and blackened gums, according to the Miami Herald. She is now under the care of a licensed dentist at the University of Miami.

To read the entire article from the Miami Herald, click here.

Fake Dentist and Family Face Child Abuse and Performing Dental Services Without a License.

The fake dentist and his wife, who apparently witnessed the procedures, face charges of child abuse, child negligence and performing dental services without a license. The couple’s daughter faces a charge of child negligence.

The license status of almost all health care professionals can easily be checked online. In Florida, license verification for all health care professionals can be checked on the Florida Department of Health (DOH) website. Hint: If they don’t have a license, they ain’t a legitimate health professional.

This case was investigated by the Miami Police Department, the DOH and a Miami-Dade County team that fights pharmaceutical crime. Detectives suspect more victims will soon come forward.

Is Miami a Hotbed for Phony Physicians?

We have seen many reports on phony doctors, dentists, nurse practitioners and others practicing in the Miami area over the past decade. Many of these operate surreptitiously and prey on immigrants and foreign nationals. Others operate blatantly and publicly advertise.

Plastic surgery and cosmetic procedures appear to be the most likely area to be “practiced” by the imposters. We have seen or heard reports of physicians performing surgery in hotel rooms. We have read reports of walk-in plastic surgery offices where animal sedatives were used to sedate the patient and plastic knee replacements were used as breast implants.

More Stories on Fake Physicians and Other Health Professionals to Come.

In the near future on this blog, we will include additional articles on fake doctors and health professionals, some old, some new.

To see a recent blog on a Florida teen impersonating a physician’s assistant (PA), click here. You can also read the story of a fake plastic surgeon in New York by clicking here.

Sound Off.

Have you heard of any stories about fake health care professionals? What do you think if this story? Leave your comments below.


Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Health Care Providers in DOH Cases.

The Health Law Firm represents dentists, pharmacists, pharmacies, physicians, nurses, and other health providers in investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, inspections and audits involving the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), Department of Health (DOH), and other law enforcement agencies.

If you are aware of an investigation of you or your practice, or if you have been contacted by the DEA or DOH, contact an experienced health law attorney immediately.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources:

Sanchez, Melissa. “Little Havana Man Accused of Injuring Girl with Illegal Dental Work.” Miami Herald. (September 12, 2012). From: http://www.miamiherald.com/2012/09/12/2999610/little-havana-man-accused-of-injuring.html

CBS Miami. “Girl Leaves Dental Dungeon With Mangled Teeth; 3 Charged With Child Abuse.” CBS Miami. (September 12, 2012). From: http://miami.cbslocal.com/2012/09/12/girl-leaves-dental-clinic-with-disfigured-teeth-3-charged-with-child-abuse/

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.

Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Colorado Surgeon Accused of Botching Multiple Robotic Arm Surgeries

CCS Blog LabelBy Carole C. Schriefer, R.N., J.D., The Health Law Firm and George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

A Colorado surgeon allegedly faces 14 counts of unprofessional conduct associated with the use a robotic arm used during surgeries, according to the formal administrative complaint. The Colorado Medical Board filed the complaint on April 2, 2013, alleging that from 2008 until 2010, the surgeon cut and tore blood vessels, left sponges and other instruments inside of patients, injured patients through padding and positioning, subjected some patients to overly long surgeries and had to abort kidney donation procedures because of mistakes. The surgeon is also accused of not documenting the mistakes in patient charts.

According to the Colorado Board of Medicine’s administrative complaint, the surgeon was using the da Vinci robot, manufactured by Intuitive Surgical, Inc., for surgeries.

Click here to read the formal complaint from the Colorado Medical Board.

This complaint was filed around the same time as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) launched a review of the robotic procedures.

A Number of Patients Speak Out On Surgeries.

The complaint lists 11 patient cases allegedly mishandled by the surgeon.

In one case, a 22-year-old woman wanted to donate a kidney to her brother. She was informed by the surgeon that the robot was the “gold standard” for kidney removals and transplants. During the surgery, the surgeon allegedly injured the patient’s aorta. To stop the bleeding, the surgeon allegedly converted to an open surgery, then aborted the kidney removal. After the attempted surgery, the patient allegedly went into post-operative distress and an X-ray showed a sponge that had been left inside the patient. The patient also alleges she was left with nerve damage after being improperly padded.

In another case, the surgeon allegedly used the robot on an 86-year-old man with metastatic cancer. The surgeon allegedly injured the patient’s aorta, and the robot arm moved when it should not have, causing another tear. The patient suffered kidney failure after the operation, and the family withdrew the patient’s life support.

Surgeon Suspended for Performing Robotic Surgeries.

In the complaint, the Colorado Medical Board is asking an administrative law judge to discipline the surgeon’s license to practice medicine. An article in The Denver Post states that the surgeon had his robotic-surgery privileges suspended for three months in 2010. The hospital would not say whether or not the surgeon received new training before allowing him to use the robotic arm after his suspension.

To read the entire article from The Denver Post, click here.

FDA and Other Medical Societies Leery of Robotic Procedures.

In March 2013, the FDA began interviewing surgeons about issues with the robotic surgery units, according to Fierce Health IT. The agency is allegedly trying to figure out why there has been an uptick in adverse event reports, including damaged organs and device failures, and whether these are a result of error or design problems.

For a list of other sources discussing possible adverse outcomes from robotic surgery, please see “references” below.

The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the Massachusetts Quality and Patient Safety Division are also warning health care professionals about the risks associated with robotic surgeries, according to Fierce Health IT. The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists said that these types of surgeries should not be the first or second choice for women undergoing routine hysterectomies. The Massachusetts Quality and Patient Safety Division sent a letter advising doctors of the safety concerns regarding robotic surgery.

Click here to read the entire article from Fierce Health IT.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced with Investigations of Health Professionals and Providers.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm provide legal representation to physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, CRNAs, pain management doctors, dentists, pharmacists, psychologists and other health providers in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) investigations, FBI investigations, Medicare investigations, Medicaid investigations and other types of investigations of health professionals and providers.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

As a health care professional, does your facility use robotic arm surgeries? Do you believe they are the safer option? Do you think the FDA should take a closer look at these machines? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Booth, Michael. “Colorado Charges Doctor in Problem-Plagued Robo-Surgeries at Porter.” The Denver Post. (April 10, 2013). From: http://www.denverpost.com/breakingnews/ci_22998041/colorado-charges-doctor-botched-robo-surgeries-at-porter

Hall, Susan. “Robo-Surgery Mistakes Land Physician in Hot Water.” Fierce Health IT. (April 15, 2013). From: http://www.fiercehealthit.com/story/robo-surgery-mistakes-land-physician-hot-water/2013-04-15

Colorado Medical Board v. Warren J. Kortz, M.D. Case Number ME 2013. Formal Complaint (April 2, 2013). From:http://www.thehealthlawfirm.com/uploads/Colo%20v.%20Warren%20Kortz%20MD.pdf

Gold, Ashley. “Health Officials Warn Complications Robotic Surgeries.” Fierce Health IT. (March 26, 2013). From: http://www.fiercehealthit.com/story/health-officials-warn-complications-robotic-surgeries/2013-03-26

Hall, Susan. “OBGYN Group: Robotic Surgeries Not Best Choice for Routine Hysterectomies.” (March 15, 2013). From: http://www.fiercehealthit.com/story/obgyn-group-robotic-surgery-not-best-choice-routine-hysterectomies/2013-03-15

Garde, Damian. “FDA Echoes Questions Over Intuitives’s Surgical Robot.” Fierce Medical Devices. (March 1, 2013). From: http://www.fiercemedicaldevices.com/story/fda-echoes-questions-over-intuitives-surgical-robot/2013-03-01

Bird, Julie. Much of Robo-Surgery Marketing ‘Unsubstantiated.’” Fierce Health IT. (July, 24, 2012). From”
http://www.fiercehealthit.com/story/much-robotic-surgery-marketing-unsubstantiated/2012-07-24

About the Authors: Carole C. Schriefer is an attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Avenue, Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

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